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GENEALOGY COL-LECTION 



t% kibmi tie Mouutains. 



A HISTORY 



THE LUTHERAN CONGREGATIONS 



Perry County, Pennsylvania. 



By rev. D. H. FQCHT, A.M., 

Pastor of Christ's Lutheran Church, New Bloomfleld, Perrj Couaty, Penna 



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BALTIMORE: 

T. NEWTON KURTZ, 

151 WEST PRATT STREET. 

1862. 



PEEFACE. 



In May, 1859^ the Historical Society of the Lutheran 
Church in the United States passed the following resolu- 
tion : 

" Resolved, That the ministers of our Church be request- 
ed, each to prepare a brief statement from church-records 
in his charge, of the date of the formation of each church, 
the successive pastors in charge, the present number of 
communicants, the language or languages employed in 
public worship, together with any important events in its 
history, and sketches of the life of the pastors, and for- 
ward the same in a letter by mail to our Curator, at Get- 
tysburg, Pennsylvania." 

Previous to the passage of this resolution, the writer 
of these pages had prepared historical sketches of the 
churches of his own charge, and afterwards at the request 
of others he extended his researches to all the Lutheran 
congregations in Perry County. The result of his labors 
is now before the reader. 

Until a late date no church-records were kept by most 
of the older congregations, and as the aged who had some 
knowledge of their early history were passing rapidly 
away, it was thought that something should be done, and 
done soon, to rescue from oblivion the history of those 
congregations ; it was thought, also, that such a history 
would be interesting and instructive to the present and 
future generations. 



Vi PREFACE. 

At first it was supposed that the task thus assumed 
would be an easy and pleasant one ; and if nothing more 
than a general statement of facts had been required, this 
supposition would have been correct. But vague gene- 
ralities would have been unsatisfactory in a local history, 
and not in accordance with the wish of those for whose 
benefit it was specially designed. The only course left 
. for the writer was to enter into a detail of particulars. 
Here, however, the difiiculties he encountered were great, 
often almost "insurmountable, owing to the want of data. 
In such cases, collateral aids were called into requisition. 

The author availed himself of every source of informa- 
tion within his reach. He consulted scores of aged per- 
sons, overhauled the minutes of the different Synods, 
sought out old documents in the hands of individuals, in 
the archives of the different churches and of the court- 
house of the county, turned over the leaves of the Church 
periodicals, especially of the Lutheran Observer, and of the 
different secular papers published in the county, and cor- 
'- responded with all those of whom it was supposed infor- 
mation could be obtained. Sometimes he was successful, 
but as often disappointed, in eliciting the information he 
wanted. He flatters himself, however, with the conviction, 
that not a fact of essential importance escaped his notice. 

Great care was taken to verify all the data, to arrange 
the facts and material in chronological order, and to allow 
the facts so arranged to tell their own story, and fre- 
quently in their own language. The history of each 
church is brought down to June, 1862. As the circum- 
stances of the different congregations were often so simi- 
lar, repetition was sometimes unavoidable. Each congre- 



gation has a history of its own, and it was deemed proper 
to give that history without regard to the many or few 
points in which it coincided with the history of otlier con- 
gregations. The style is adapted, as much as possible, to 
the nature of the subjects treated. Our indebtedness for 
aid from different persons and sources is noticed at the 
proper place. 

After the completion of the work, it was the author's 
design to " forward the same by mail to the Curator, at 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania." This design was, however, 
overruled by the wish of the Synod of Central Pennsyl- 
vania, and the protestation of the members of the churches 
in Perry County, all of whom expressed a strong desire 
that it might be given them in a permanent form. This 
request the writer could not set aside, especially when he 
remembered that from local histories, in which facts are 
minutely detailed, a general history of the Church must 
be constructed, and that in this respect these humble 
pages might contribute their mite. And though these 
sketches contain many facts and incidents of recent date 
and still fresh in the memory of many, the writer was re- 
minded that time, in its onward march, will invest them 
with interest increasing in proportion as they fade from 
the recollection of men and sink away into the past. It 
was aTgued, also, that by this means there would be 
placed in the hands of those who cherish veneration for 
departed ancestry, love for the Church, or long associa- 
tion, or present residence, a record of religious history of 
peculiar interest, — a record which parents would wish to 
hand down to their children ; that there are many, who 
still worship God where their fathers sung the praises of 



the Most High and their orisons x^aid, and who often medi- 
tate with deep solemnity over their silent graves ; and 
that there are not a few, now dwelling in the far "West, 
where they are surrounded by new scenes, hut still bound 
to old ones by ties that can not be broken, — to all these it 
was supposed no service more acceptable could be ren- 
dered than by giving them, in a permanent form, a re- 
membrancer of the old, middle-aged, and new churches 
with which are associated their earliest and latest recol- 
lections, and of the old and new graveyards in which re- 
pose the ashes of their dearest and nearest friends. 

These sketches were prepared amid the constant inter- 
ruptions and many hindrances incident to the duties a 
pastor owes a large charge. They are not what we could 
wish them to be, yet they are all we could make them in 
three years' hard labor, — labor snatched from hours we 
should have had for rest. Only he who has made the ex- 
periment can fully appreciate works of this kind, and 
fully comprehend the difficulties connected with their pre- 
paration. We send this volume out into the world, as- 
sured that those who can form any conception of the labor 
required in its preparation, growing out of the want of 
documents, of lost and faded records, of deciphering bad 
German manuscripts, of the sameness of material to be 
presented, and of the vagueness of traditions to hh con- 
sulted, will with readiness appreciate any merit it may 
possess, and with mildness censure the defects from which 
it does not claim to be free. 

D. H. F. 

New Bloomfield, Pa., 
Sept. 24th, 1862. 



RECOMMENDATION 

FROM THE SYNOD OF CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA. 



The document placed in the hands of committee, No. 17, is a history of all 
the Lutheran congregations in Perry County, Pa., by the Rev. D. H. Focht 
of New Bloomfield. Said history traces the rise and progress of the congre- 
gations from their earliest inception to the present time. The document bears 
evidence of great care and patient investigation in its preparation. It con- 
tains much of importance to the Lutheran Church, and will contribute,— if 
published, as we trust it will be,— to Lutheran literature. We congratulate 
Rev. Focht for his success in collecting so many valuable statistics in this 
document, and hope that he will have it published as soon as possible. As 
an expression of the opinion of your committee, we would beg leave to offer 
the following : 

Resolved, That this Synod recommend the publication of said history. 

Resolved, That in the opinion of this Synod, this history contains matter 
that should be particularly interesting to the members of the Lutheran 
Church in Perry County, and that a copy should be purchased by every 
family. 

Resolved, That this Synod use its influence in introducing this work among 
Lutherans generally within its bounds. 

Respectfully submitted, 

P. WiLLARD, 
W. H. DiVEN, 

G. M. Settlemoyer, 

Samuel Comp. 
Belleville, Pa., May 4th, 1861. 

On motion, this report was accepted and adopted. See Minnies of Synod 
pp. 26, 27. 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Intkoduction, ....... 13 

CHAPTER I. 

The Lotsville Charge, . . . .21 

Section I. Lebanon Church at Loysville, . . .21 

11. Mount Zion Church in Spring Township, . 65 

III. Lndolph's (Germany) Church, in Spring Township, 82 

CHAPTER II. 
The Bloomfield Charge, ...... 91 

Section I. Christ's Church, at New Bloomfield, . . 91 

II. St. Andrew's (Shuman's) Church, in Saville Town- 
ship, ...... 134 

III. St John's (Bealor's) Church, near Markelville, in 

Juniata Township, . . . . 146 

IV. The Congregation and Church at Newport, . 157 
V. The Congregation at Mansville, in Centre Town- 
ship, ...... 169 

Remarks respecting the Bloomfield Charge, . 180 

CHAPTER III. 
The Blain Charge, . . . . . .183 

Section I. Zion Congregation, at Blain, in Jackson Township, 184 
II. St. Paul's Lutheran Church, in Madison Township, 199 

III. Emanuel Church, near Ickesburg, in Saville Town- 

ship, ...... 203 

IV. Lutheran Congregation in Henry's Valley, Jackson 

Township, . . . . .211 

V. Preaching Stations connected with the Blain Charge, 213 

CHAPTER IV. 
The Petersburg Charge, ..... 215 

Section I. Christ's (Lutheran) Church at Petersburg, . . 216 



Xll CONTENTS. 

Section II. Mount Zion Church, in Fishing Creek Valley, Rye 

Township, ..... -^30 

III. Mount Pisgah Evangelical Lutheran Church, in Car- 

roll Township, . . . . . 246 

IV. St. David's (Billow's) Church, in Wheatfield Town- 

ship, ...... -257 

V. Church near New Buffalo, on the Susquehanna, in 

Watts Township, .... 261 

VI. Preaching Station in connection with the Petersburg 

Charge, ..... 268 

CHAPTER V. 
The Liverpool Chakge, ...... 270 

Section I. The Congregation at Liverpool, . . 270 

II. Christ's Church in Wild Cat Valley, Liverpool Town- 

ship, ...... 282 

III. St. Michael's Church in Pfoutz's Valley, Greenwood 

Township, ..... 286 

IV. St. James's Church in Turkey Valley, Greenwood 

Township, Juniata County, . . . 311 

V. Zion Lutheran Church at McKee's Half-Falls, in 

Snyder County, .... 313 

CHAPTER VL 
The Millerstown Charge, . . . .315 

Section I. St. Samuel's Church at Millerstown, . . 315 

II. Centre Evangelical Lutheran Church, in Buffalo 

Township, . . . . .320 

III. Tuscarora Evangelical Lutheran Congregation in 

Raccoon Valley, Tuscarora Township, . 338 

IV. Preaching Stations connected with the Millerstown 

Charge, 340 

CHAPTER VII. 
A Sketch of the Life of the Rev. John William Heim, . 342 

CHAPTER VII L 
Genius of the Lutheran Church in Perry County, . . 362 

Conclusion, . . . . . • • 369 



INTRODUCTION. 



The lands west of the Kittochtinny Hills, otherwise called the 
Endless or Blue Mountains, were not purchased of the Indians of 
the Six Nations till July, 1754. As early, however, as 1740 or 
1741, "one Frederick Star, a German, with two or three of his 
countrymen, made some small settlements on Big Juniata, situate 
about twenty-five miles from the mouth thereof, and about ten 
miles north from the Blue Hills, a place much esteemed by the 
Indians for some of their best hunting-ground."* These small 
settlements were located on a flat, on the west bank of the Juni- 
ata, and a short distance northwest of Newport; and these Ger- 
mans were the first white settlers, of" whom we have any account, 
northwest of the Blue or North Mountains and west of the Sus- 
quehanna. At the urgent request of the Indians, the Provincial 
Government removed these Germans in 1742, and forbade others, 
'<at their highest peril," from settling on those lands. But not- 
withstanding the earnest protestation of the Indians and the strict 
prohibition of the Government, the example of Star was soon fol- 
lowed by many others, of Scotch-Irish and German origin, and 
settlements were commenced on Juniata River and in Sherman's 
Valley. In 1750, when Cumberland County was organized, the 
Government took decisive measures for the removal of all who had 
settled on lands not bought of the Indians. They were all driven 
to the east of the North Mountains, their cabins were burnt, and 
the settlements destroyed. Not long after, many of them re- 
turned to their former places of improvement in the wilderness. 



* Col. Records, Vol. V, pp. 441-445. 

2 



14 INTRODUCTION. 

The Provincial Government was strong enough to drive these 
squatters out of Sherman's Valley, but by far too weak to keep 
them out. The Indians became enraged, and threatened sum- 
mary vengeance. Hence, to satisfy all parties and obviate all 
difficulties, the purchase of a large tract of land from the Indians 
was strongly recommended by Governor Hamilton. In accord- 
ance with this recommendation, all the lands west of the Blue or 
North Mountains and east of the Alleghany Mountains were 
bought of the Indians, at Albany, in July, 1754, for the conside- 
ration of four hundred pounds. 

On the 3d of February, 1755, the Land Office was opened for 
the unrestricted sale of land in Sherman's Valley and on Juniata 
River. During 1755, the applications and grants for land were 
many, and the influx of settlers from the eastern counties was 
great. These pioneer settlers were Scotch-Irish, Germans, and a 
few English. The new settlements prospered. In the mean- 
time, most of the Indians west of the Alleghany Mountains, and 
along the lakes, were brought under the influence of the French, 
and both did their utmost to prevent the westward extension of 
settlements by the English. 

In July, 1755, General Braddock was defeated by the French 
and Indians at Fort Duquesne (now Pittsburg), and in a few 
months after that tragic battle, the Indians fell upon the defence- 
less frontier settlers, cruelly and mercilessly killing, scalping, and 
abducting them, burning their houses and cabins, and destroying 
and wasting everything. Consternation and dismay filled every 
heart along the frontier in Pennsylvania. Those who escaped the 
stroke of the tomahawk and the keen edge of the scalping-knife, 
fled to Cumberland Valley, and other places of safety east of the 
North Mountain. All the settlements in Sherman's Valley, and 
on the Juniata, were deserted, and were for some time to the 
white man, '•' the region and shadow of death." 

Though peace had been partially made with the Indians in 
1758, they still appeared in marauding parties along the frontier, 
committing depredations and murder. Hence, from the fall of 
1755 to the latter part of 1761, but little land was entered at the 



INTRODUCTION. 15 

Land Office. To the surprise of tlie pioneers, the Indians then 
retired, and the number of settlers increased rapidly, and much 
laud was located in 1762, and the earlier part of 1763. The In- 
dians having, however, in the meantime, secretly confederated to 
cut olf all the frontier settlements at one fell stroke, invaded them 
in 1763, during harvest, and committed the most savage cruel- 
ties and wanton destruction. Such of the people as did not 
escape were murdered, scalped, or abducted as prisoners. Sher- 
man's Valley was again deserted. No land was located in 1764, 
and the terror of the frontier settlers subsided but little till Colo- 
nel Boquet conquered the Indians in November, 1764, and com- 
pelled them to sue for peace. 

After the cessation of the Indian wars, the best lands in Sher- 
man's Valley and along the Juniata were soon all located and 
settled, though, as is usual on frontiers, the population was for 
some time unstable, fluctuating, and erratic. 

So far as we have been able to find, the first references to 
churches within the precincts of Perry County, are the following 
two. The Jirsf, in a warrant granted Thomas Ross, and others, 
it is said: "Surveyed, April 17th, 1767. Order dated Septem- 
ber 9th, 1766. Thomas Ross, and others, in trust for the con- 
gregation in Tyrone." The old church was, however, not erected 
on this parcel of ground in Tyrone Township till 1793, and is 
now known as the " Centre Presbyterian Church." The second, 
in a warrant granted Nicholas Robison in 1766, it is stated that 
this land "lies northwest of the church." The tract of land on 
which this church stood, lies in Miller Township, about four 
miles east of Bloomfield, and is at present owned by Mr. Abra- 
ham Fleurie. With regard to this church, we are indebted to 
Colonel John Hartzell, of Newport, for the following information. 

" Dear Sir : 

"I had a conversation with Mr. George C. Lees, of Ohio, in 
regard to the old church at Dick's Gap. He said that he resided 
in that neighborhood fifty-two years ago, and that the church 
was at that time already nearly rotted down, only a few of the 



16 INTRODUCTION. 

logs were remaining, and a white oak tree, about fifteen inches 
across the butt, stood in the inside of the northwest corner of the 
building. Mr. Lees said that he understood, from what Mr. 
Enoch Lewis told him (Mr. Lewis was then an old man), that 
the church had gone into decay more than one hundred years 
ago. Mr. Lees thinks it was a Roman Catholic church, built by 
the French." 

The above statement we give as we got it. We do not think 
it was a Roman Catholic church ; the French never held sway 
on the east of the Alleghany Mountains. But by whom or for 
whom it was built, it is now impossible to say. It was there 
already in 1766. The foundation-marks of the building may 
still be seen, about twenty by eighteen feet in size. The grave- 
yard is quite large, and literally in the woods, being overgrown 
by underbrush and some large trees. We noticed some trees 
standing apparently in the centre of graves, which we suppose 
cannot be less than one hundred years old. We were told that 
an old Indian path led through Dick's Gap, and close by this 
place, and that at an early day, white traders among the Indians 
were the first buried here, and that probably some are Indian 
graves. This statement seems to be corroborated by the fact, 
that some apparently old graves are covered by large heaps of 
large stones, a thing not practised after the land was settled by 
the whites. This is an interesting spot, and the church and 
graveyard are a mystery. Besides these two instances, we have 
not found a single reference to churches in Perry County till 
1790. Nor need we be surprised at this. The Indian wars had 
just closed, and order was about being restored, when we have 
at least two churches alluded to; but then soon after this, the 
revolutionary agitations commenced, and though the population 
had considerably increased, many were mustered for the defence 
of the western frontiers, and some were enrolled in the Con- 
tinental army. Many, also, doubtless, cared little or nothing about 
churches, and the few who felt the want of a preached Gospel were 
scattered, and generally poor. 



INTRODUCTION. 17 

A large proportion of tlie early settlers of the territory now 
embraced in Perry County were of German origin. The follow- 
ing are a few of those who located tracts of land, by order from 
the Land Office : In 1755, John Fautz, in Fautz's Valley, Green- 
wood Township; Baltzer Schellhorn, Michael Brocard, Christian 
Ewig, John Garner; in 1763, Frederick Weiser, Peter Grove, 
Matthias Karr; in 1765, Stophel Muntz; in 1767, John Big- 
ger, John Conrad, James Verderer, Christopher Mann, John 
Cirecus ; in 1768, Everhart Liedig, Leonard Fautz; in 1772, 
Frederick Kiihl, Henry Altsbach, George Albrecht (Albright), 
Martin Wain, John Licht (Light), Jacob Bock (Buck); in 1773, 
George Bader, Christopher Heyne, Jacob Liickenbihl, Abraham 
Letcha, Augustus Milligsack, John Miller, Morris Berbeck, 
Adam Reichart; in 1774, Ludwig Granau, Frederick Hummell, 
Valentine Hoffman, Nicholas Littig, Michael Wild, Jacob Wild, 
Samuel Starr, Joseph Jobson, John Ord; in 1775, Matthias 
Blocker, John Kepler, Samuel Lenhart (Leonard); in 1778, 
Philip Christian ; in 1781, Matthias Hart, David Bapp, Adam 
Stock, Christian Weirman, John Weirman ; in 1785, John 
Bauer (Bower), Michael Kapp (Capp), John Capp, Adam Eck- 
ert, George Grotz, Peter Hoofnagel, Frederick Harter, John 
Long, Christian Leonard (Lenhard), Jacob Nieraan, Peter 
Sehreyer, Zach. Spangel, Jacob Wagner, Michael Winter; in 
1786, Henry Banker, George Albright, John Trostel, John 
Fred. Langenberg, James Radnian, Samuel Utly, John Flach ; 
in 1787, Daniel Diehl, Samuel Diehl, Jacob Lupfer, James Mot- 
zer, Christopher Schneider; in 1788, William Delzell; in 1789, 
John Kepner, Henry Zimmerman. All these, and many others 
whose names cannot now be ascertained, entered lands at the 
Land Office. The vast majority of Germans, however, bought 
lands, and generally the best too, at second-hand from the pioneer 
Scotch-Irish, most of whom moved further westward. At first, 
the Germans settled chiefly in clusters or neighborhoods, being 
no doubt drawn together by a strong national predilection, and 
the use of a common language. Thus they formed neighbor- 
hoods in Fautz's Valley, on Fishing Creek, at Loysville, at Blain, 
2* 



18 INTRODUCTION. 

at New Germantowu, and some other localities. Between them 
and the Scotch-Irish, feuds were not uncommon in those early days. 
Afterwards, the Germans, possessing themselves of some of the 
best lands, spread gradually over the whole of Sherman's Valley, 
and along the Juniata, and mingled freely with their Scotch-Irish 
neighbors, so that at this time their descendants constitute by far 
the larger part of the population of Perry County, and have, with 
few exceptions, relinquished the use of the German language for 
that of the English. The Scotch-Irish yielded up his land, and 
the German his language. 

The majority of these early German settlers were members of 
the Lutheran Church, the first Protestant church, now numbering 
in the world from forty to forty-five millions of members. In 
common with their fellow-pioneers, they suffered all the hard- 
ships and misfortunes incident to border life. Like others, many 
of them were driven from their homes, fell bleeding and dead 
under the murderous tomahawk, were scalped or abducted as 
prisoners, and subjected to all the horrors of savage cruelty; 
some heroically defended with their lives, the frontiers against 
the incursions of the merciless Indian, and others, in the revolu- 
tionary struggle for freedom, sacrificed their lives on the altar of 
their country, and with their blood consecrated the soil to liberty. 
In their youth, these Germans had been instructed in the doc- 
trines of the Christian religion, as set forth in the Catechism of 
their church. Their earliest, most hallowed, and enduring recol- 
lections were associated with the house and worship of God. 
They could not forget Jerusalem, her prayers and hymns of praise. 
Trained as they had been in their youth and former homes, they 
could not but long for a house of worship, and the ordinances of 
religion, and to them cling wherever they were, and respect them 
as long as they lived ; for the German is characteristically reli- 
gious. And now, living in a new and wild border settlement, 
destitute of the means of grace, they deeply felt their loss. Their 
prayer was, " Help us, God of our salvation, for the glory of 
thy name ;" and the answer was : " The people which are left of 
the sword, have found grace in the wilderness." 



INTRODUCTION. 19 

Tradition informs ns that these pioneer Lutherans were occa- 
sionally visited by ministers of their own church as early as 1764, 
and from authentic records, we learn that in 1774, they secured 
the stated ministry of a pastor residing in their midst. In the 
results of these early and feeble eiforts on the part of the mem- 
bers, and of the labors of the pioneer ministers, we have in Perry 
County the rise and progress of the Lutheran congregations, 
whose history is traced in the following pages. 



HISTORY. 



CHAPTER I. 

LOYSVILLE CHARGE. 

Some of the very earliest settlers of the territory now included 
within the limits of Perry County were Lutherans. Their num- 
ber was considerable before the Revolutionary war, and greatly 
increased, by constant accessions, for a number of years after its 
close. That they were occasionally visited by ministers of their 
own church before 1774 we learn from tradition, but are unable 
to give names and dates. Afterwards they enjoyed the frequent 
visits of the Rev. John G. Butler, who was pastor of the Lutheran 
congregation at Carlisle from 1780 to 1788, and performed what 
may be called home missionary labor on the frontier. As Sher- 
man's Valley then formed part of Cumberland County, and the 
number of members in the Valley was so great, they could not 
have escaped the notice of that zealous and indefatigable pioneer 
minister of the Gospel. From those small beginnings, the Church 
in Perry County grew up to her present number of members and 
congregations. 

SECTION I. 

LEBANON CHURCH AT LOYSVILLE.* 

At an early date a number of Lutheran families settled in Ty- 
rone Township, in a district of country in the centre of which 

* For much and important information relative to this church, we are in- 
debted to Jacob Crist, Esq., of Loysville. 



22 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

Loysville was afterwards located. Here the Zimmermans, Loys, 
Hammers, Hollenbachs, Bernheisels, Fleishers, Bowers, and many 
others made their homes. They were joined by others from time 
to time. As above stated, these members of the church enjoyed 
the visits of Rev. Butler, and perhaps some other ministers, be- 
fore they had a stated pastor. Rev. Butler left Cumberland 
County in 1788, and shortly after that, the 

Rev. John Timothy Kiihl, 

of Franklin County, Pa., commenced to visit the members of the 
church in Sherman's Valley, and in 1790 he moved among them 
and became their first regular pastor. In an old document be- 
longing to the congregation at Loysville, it is said : "In the year 
of our Lord 1790, the Germans in Sherman's Valley secured the 
Evangelical Lutheran minister, the Rev. John Timotheus Ktihl, 
as their pastor." The late Mr. George Fleisher, of Saville Town- 
ship, who died in 1855, aged eighty-four years, when nineteen 
years old with a team moved Rev. Kiihl's family and effects from 
Franklin County to this Valley. Rev. Kiihl resided near where 
Loysville is now located. From the above documentary notice, 
we infer that he visited and preached to the members scattered at 
various places in the whole A'^alley. Before the erection of Leba- 
non Church at Loysville, he preached in barns and private dwell- 
ings at diflferent places in that neighborhood. Encouraged by a 
minister living in their midst, and united in their desires and 
efforts, the members proceeded, in 1794, to build a house of wor- 
ship, which they denominated, — 

LEBANON CHURCH. 

This church edifice was erected on a piece of ground containing 
two acres and forty-two perches, donated for church and school 
purposes by Martin Bcrnheisel and Michael Loy, both of whom 
were members of the Lutheran Church. Subscriptions by the 
members towards the erecting of the edifice were generally paid 
in lumber, labor, &c. The building was of large and choice pine 



CHAPTER I. 23 

logs, Tvhich were all hauled together on a set day by those mem- 
bers who had teams. Mr. Zachariah Eice (grandfather of Henry 
Kice, Esq., of Bloomfield, and others of that name) arrived early 
in the morning with a fine pine log, which he had cut at what 
was called " The Barrens," above Mr. J. Bixler's mill in Madison 
Township. Mr. Rice intended to have the first log on the ground, 
as this was in those days esteemed a great feat ; but to his sur- 
prise, when he arrived, he found that he was anticipated by Mr. 
Abraham Bower, who had brought a log part of the way on the 
previous evening. This was, however, considered unfair on the 
part of the latter. As near as can be ascertained, the church was 
forty feet long by tMrti/ feet wide. Messrs. Michael Loy, George 
Hammer, and Peter Scheively, were the Building Committee, and 
John Calhoun did the carpenter work. The building stood for 
some years in an unfinished state, during which time the congre- 
gation managed to worship in it occasionally. The gallery was 
then erected on three sides, the roof was ceiled inside with boards, 
the walls were plastered inside, and a small, cup-shaped pulpit 
was put up against the wall on a post about five feet high. The 
pulpit was painted white, and ascended by a high flight of steps. 
The church was, in 1808, weather-boarded and painted white. 
Hence it was afterwards generally called " The White Church." 
"This church was built by some thirty Lutheran famiHes, and 
tioo or three German Reformed. The Lutherans were, however, 
so generous as to give their Reformed brethren an equal right to 
it." In 1850, this old church edifice was sold (the pews ex- 
cepted) to Mr. J. B. Zimmerman for eiyhty-three dollars. 

A short time after the church had been built, a large school- 
house was erected on the same lot of ground and near the church. 
A partition divided the school-house inside, and a large chimney 
occupied the centre. One end of the house was occupied by the 
teacher and his family, and the other by the school. For many 
years a sort of congregational school was kept here. Schools of 
this kind were common in those days, and it is to be regretted 
that each congregation has not such a school in our days. 

Two or three persons were buried on this lot of church-ground 



24 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE M<)UNTAINS. 

before old Lebanon Church was built. After the erection of the 
church, a portion of ground was appropriated for a graveyard, 
where the gray fathers and founders of the church, their children, 
and children's children, and many others, now rest in hope. 
Since then the graveyard has been enlarged several times. 

Rev. Kiihl served this congregation and some other preaching 
places in the Valley till about 1796. Beside the erecting of the 
church, we are, for want of information, unable to say what suc- 
cess attended his ministry, or where he labored after he left 
Sherman's Valley. In 1797, the congregation was supplied with 
preaching by the 

Rev. John Herhst, 

pastor of the Lutheran Church at Carlisle, who preached here 
once every four weeks, and also occasionally at a number of other 
places in the Valley. He is said to have been a good man, though 
not an able preacher. In 1798, the following persons were con- 
firmed by him at Loysville or Lebanon Church : 

John Arnold, William Cooney, Margaret Steidel, 

Solomon Bower, Benjamin Rice, Magdalene Steidel, 

Jacob Bower, William Brickley, Sarah Borrel, 

Charles Smith, Jacob Millei-, Susan Miller, 

John Cooney, John Miller, Liibkey, 

Daniel Cooney, George Gottschall, Liibkey. 

Henry Cooney, Benjamin Moses, 

The above names Mr. Jacob Arnold gave from memory, and 
he thinks that Mr. Solomon Bower and himself are the only sur- 
vivors of those who were then admitted to full communion in the 
church. In 1801, Rev. Herbst resigned at Carlisle, and was suc- 
ceeded there, in 1802, by 

Rev. Frederick Sanno, 

who preached at Loysville once every four weeks, and occasion- 
ally at some other points in Sherman's Valley. He was highly 
esteemed by the members, and very successful in his labors. As 
this was the only congregation that had at that time a church and 



CHAPTER I. 



25 



enjoyed regular preaching, the members all around for many miles 
came to Lebanon Church to worship. To give an idea of the 
strength of the congregation, and to show who the members were 
at that time, we will subjoin the names of the catechumens and 
communicants. This list of the names of members may be in- 
teresting to those now living. It is to be regretted that no other 
entry of admissions by confirmation or of communicants was made 
till 1850. On the 25th of March, 1804, the Rev. Sanno con- 
firmed the following fifty-one persons : 



Adam Scheder, 
Charles Liibkey, 
Jacob Miller, 
Daniel Schaefi"er, 
Daniel Motzer, 
Philip Stambach, 
George Klein, 
John Schwieger, 
John Fenichel, 
Solomon Gottschall, 
Jacob Albert, 
Susan SchaeiFer, 
Magdalene Bower, 
Catharine Motzer, 
Esther Bower, 
Catharine Gottschall, 
Magdalene Gottschall, 
Samuel SchaeiFer, 
John Breiner, 
Jacob Weary, 
John Zimmerman, 
Daniel Spohn, 
Barbara Arnold, 
Sarah Steidel, 
Maria Breiner, 
Maria Arnold, 



Elizabeth Hartman, 
Christiana Olinger, 
Maria Fusselman, 
Elizabeth Fusselman, 
Elizabeth Billman, 
Catharine Arnold, 
Barbara Spohn, 
Susan Zimmerman, 
George Ernst, 
Michael Ketncr, 
Valentine Borrel, 
Adam Lob (now Lyons), 
Daniel Stambach, 
Maria Hammer, 
Elizabeth Steidel, 
Christiana Stambach, 
Magdalene Liibkey, 
Anna Maria Ernst, 
Maria Ketner, 
Catharine Hammer, 
Maria Weary, 
Christiana Long, 
Margaret Weary, 
Justina Fenichel, 
Susan Gottschall. 



26 



CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 



With the above persons, admitted by confirmation, the follow- 
ing ninety members communed on the 26th, it being Sunday : 



Adam Bernheisel, 
Barbara Bernheisel, 
Christopher Bower, 
Solomon Bower, 
Nicholas Loy, 
Jacob Ketner, 
Catharine Ketner, 
Frederick Breiner, 
Maria Breiner, 
George Fleisher, 
Margaret Fleisher, 
Jacob Steidel, 
Margaret Steidel, 
Magdalene Steidel, 
Henry Zimmerman, 
Margaret Zimmerman, 
Peter Moses, 
Agues Long, 
Adam Smith, 
Barbara Smith, 
George Miller, 
Peter Reisdorif, 
John Fusselraan, 
Barbara Fusselman, 
Henry Bernheisel, 
Eve Bernheisel, 
Henry Moses, 
Elizabeth Scheibly, 
Susanna lleinsmith, 
George Wolf, 
Daniel Smith, 
Charles Smith, 
Regina Smith, 
Jacob Miller, 



Daniel Fusselman, 

Conrad Ernst, 

John Lob {English, Lyons), 

Jacob Haman, 

George Kremer, 

John Loy, 

Michael Loy, 

Barbara Haller, 

John SchaefFer, 

Barbara SchaefFer, 

Christiana ReisdorflF, 

Anna Hollenbach, ^ 

Susanna Gamber, 

Margaret Liibkey, 

Magdalene Keiner, 

Maria Kremer, 

Jacob Klinger, 

Jacob Smith, 

John Ketner, 

William Brickley, 

Peter Breiner, 

Henry Frey, 

George Fleisher, 

Sarah Fleisher, 

Magdalene Fusselman, 

Jacob Stambach, 

George Breiner, 

Jacob Schauer, 

Philip Stambach, 

Catharine Stambach, 

John Stambach, 

George Hammer, 

Anna Maria Hammer, 

Jacob Breiner, 



CHAPTER I. 



27 



Catharine Weary, 
John Swartz, 
William Kced, 
Abi-aham Kistler, 
Maria Kistler, 
Susanna Kistler, 
Conrad Hallman, 
Sarah Hallman, 
Peter Schauer, 
John Billman, 
Christiana Billman, 



Magdalene Breiner, 
Magdalene Kessler, 
Maria Eliz. Hollenbach, 
Justina Miller, 
Christiana Sauder, 
Elizabeth Webb, 
Michael Loy, 
Margaret Loy, 
Maria Lupfer, 
Susanna Ickes, 
Maria Bloom. 



The whole number of communicants was, at this time, one 
linndred and forty-one. Making due allowance for many who 
could not attend, as is usual on such occasions, and considering 
the sparseness of the population, we perceive at once, that the 
Lutheran portion of the population was large at that early day. 
With few exceptions, all the above-named persons have gone to 
the eternal world, though the descendants of most of them are 
still members of Lebanon Church, or some other Lutheran con- 
gregation in the county. Rev. Sanno met another class of cate- 
chumens, for instruction in the doctrines of the Christian religion, 
and on Sunday, the 2d of November, 1806, the following Jifty- 
tliree persons were admitted to full communion, by the rite of con- 
firmation : 



Jacob Miller, 
Jacob Sweger, 
Daniel Smith, 
Henry Smith, 
Samuel Cooney, 
Adam Kessler, 
Solomon Gutshall, 
George Fiin frock, 
John Moses, 
Martin Motzer, 



Simon Wingart, 
Daniel Bitter, 
Sarah Fleisher, 
Catharine Burrell, 
Sarah Billman, 
Elizabeth Billman, 
Catharine Ernst, 
Catharine Tressler, 
Margaret Loy, 
Susan Loy, 



Mary Kessler, 
Barbara Kessler, 
Christiana Guttshall, 
Catharine Shoemaker, 
Catharine Swarner, 
Ann Smith, 
Elizabeth Fiinfrock, 
Mary Reed, 
Elizabeth Reed, 
Elizabeth Briekley, 



CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 



Daniel Ernst, 
Joseph Briner, 
George Finicle, 
David Wolf, 
Adam Wolf, 
Henry Swarner, 
Christiana Smith, 
Mary Smith, 



Sarah Cooney, 
Elizabeth Cooney, 
Salome Cooney, 
Elizabeth Cooney, 
Mary Ritter, 
Sarah Lutman, 
Margaret Deck, 
Barbara Deck, 



Mary Biegelman, 
Rebecca Biegelman, 
Rebecca Bower, 
Lydia Bower, 
Hannah Motzer, 
Elizabeth Briner, 
Elizabeth Finicle.* 



Only a few of the above persons are yet with us, lingering on 
the verge of eternity ; all the rest have crossed the narrow stream, 
and now reap the reward of their doings whilst in the flesh. 

In the spring of 180S, another large class of catechumens was 
admitted to full communion by confirmation. Their names can 
not be remembered. This was the last class confirmed here by 
Rev. Sanno, who ceased his ministry in Sherman's Valley in 1809. 

Whilst Rev. Sanno was pastor at Loysville, the congregation 
flourished, and may be said to have enjoyed a glorious revival of 
religion. About one hundred and fifty new members were added 
to the church by him. He lectured on the Catechism diligently, 
and with great unction from on high. For weeks he met the 
catechumens daily, instructing and exhorting them, and singing 
and praying with them. Often they were all bathed in tears, 
some asking what they must do to be saved, whilst others re- 
joiced in a sense of pardoned sin, and acceptance with God by 
faith through Jesus Christ. Those were precious seasons of re- 
freshing from the Lord, and those who participated in them speak 
of them at this day with rapture and holy delight. We have met 
with aged persons, who were then catechumens, and who can now 
scarcely find language to describe the interesting scene, and deep 
feeling, on days of confirmation, when all the catechumens were 
publicly examined on the doctrines of our holy Christianity as 
set forth in our Catechism, and when the pastor and congrega- 

* These names were furnished us from memory by Mrs. Sarah Burrell, 
then Miss Sarah Fleisher, and one of the catechumens, but now an aged and 
pious mother in the Church. 



CHAPTER I. 29 

tion, on bended knees, united in fervently imploring Almighty 
God to bless them, and keep them unto eternal life, — when, in a 
standing posture, all united in singing with full heart and voice : 
Komm, Ohomm, du Geist des lebens, ivahrer Gott von eioigheit! 
and when the young men first, two by two, proceeded to the altar, 
paid their vows, and, on bended knees, covenanted with God, and 
received the benediction of the pastor; and then, also two by two, 
the young females, all dressed in white, came forward, and before 
men and angels witnessed a good profession, and received the right 
hand of Christian fellowship. Whilst the catechumens were con- 
firmed, a verse was sung, or a prayer off"ered at intervals, so that 
the interest of the occasion was sustained for hours, and tears of 
sorrow for sin, and of joy in the Holy Ghost, bedewed every face. 

" 'Twas the same pleasure fills 
The breast of worlds abore ; 
■Where joy, like morning dew, distils. 
And all the air is love." 

Rev. John Frederick Osterloli 

Succeeded Rev. Sanno in 1809. Whilst pastor of the Lutheran 
congregations in Sherman's Valley, Rev. Osterloh resided on a 
small tract of land of his own, in Saville Township, now belonging 
to Mr. Henry Fleisher. He preached regularly once every four 
weeks at Loysville, Bloomfield, St. Peter's in Spring Township, 
in Fishing Creek Valley at private dwellings, and, it may be, at 
some other places in the Valley occasionally. At that time all 
the territory in Perry County, west of the Juniata, was included 
in his charge. He confined himself only to a part of this terri- 
tory, whilst the other part was supplied by men who stood in no 
connection with Synod. Though Rev. Osterloh confirmed, at 
different times, large classes of catechumens at Loysville, for want 
of a church-record their names cannot now be given. This is to 
be regretted. 

In June, 1811, Mr. C. Geiger, of Fishing Creek, as lay dele- 
gate of the charge, accompanied Rev. Osterloh to Synod, held at 
Philadelphia, Pa. At this convention of Synod, Rev. Osterloh 
3* 



30 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

reported 65 infant baptisms, 137 communicants, 45 confirmations, 
6 deaths, and 2 schools. 

In May, 1812, Synod convened at Carlisle, Pa. Mr. Peter 
Moses, of the congregation at Loysville, took his seat in Synod 
as delegate from the charge. This time Kev. Osterloh reported 
C2 infant baptisms, 80 confirmations, 115 communicants, 11 fu- 
nerals, and 4 schools. In the proceedings of this session of Synod, 
wc find the following action : " As to the petition of the congre- 
gation at the school-house near Carlisle (Sulphur Spring ?), asking 
Synod to permit Rev. Sanno to serve them as pastor. This con- 
gregation was advised to secure the ministerial service of Rev. 
Osterloh ; and, at the same time, the petition of the congregation 
at LongsdorfF's (near Mechanicsburg), and of that on the Cono- 
doguinett, praying that Rev. Osterloh may serve them as pastor, 
was granted." From this it appears that Rev. Osterloh did not 
confine himself to Sherman's Valley. The members in this 
Valley became dissatisfied with him. They alleged, and justly, 
too, that he neglected them. 

At the meeting of Synod, held at Reading, Pa., in June, 1813, 
Rev. Osterloh reported 89 infant baptisms, 61 confirmations, 264 
communicants, 7 deaths, and 4 schools. This report included 
the two or three congregations he served in Cumberland Valley. 

In the minutes of Synod, held at Easton, in June, 1814, it is 
said : " In regard to the petition from the members of Zion's 
Church, in Mifflin Township, Cumberland County, praying Synod 
to allow Rev. Osterloh to serve them in connection with his other 
congregations, it was Resolved, That this petition be cheerfully 
granted." Thus, instead of devoting all his time and energies to 
the building up of the congregations in Sherman's Valley, Rev. 
Osterloh neglected them very much. Hence, most of the mem- 
bers were dissatisfied with him, and he accomplished little or no 
good among them. In this state of alienation, early in the spring 
of 1815, some of the members belonging to the Loysville con- 
gregation invited Rev. Heim to preach for them. Rev. Heim 
had received license at Easton, Pa., on the 8th of June, 1814, 
and was now residing near Miffli-ntown, Juniata County. It seems 



CHAPTER I. 31 

that he yielded to the request of the people at Loysville, and that 
they were all highly pleased with him and his preaching. Against 
all this, Rev. Osterloh protested as unwarranted interference. 
Thus, in the minutes of Synod, held at Frederick, Md., in May, 
1815, it is stated : " No. 7 is a letter from Eev. Osterloh, in which 
he complains of the interference of Rev. Heim with one of his 
congregations ; also a letter from the members of that congrega- 
tion, praying that Rev. Heim may be permitted to serve them as 
pastor." The committee appointed to adjust this difl&culty, re- 
ported as follows : " Respecting the congregation in Sherman's 
Valley, your committee is of the opinion that it would be best were 
Rev. Heim to accept a call from it and serve it as pastor. On 
motion. Synod authorized Rev. Heim to take charge of said con- 
gregation." 

In the summer of 1815, Rev. Osterloh moved to Mechanics- 
burg, Cumberland County, and according to resolution of Synod, 
the 

Rev. Jolin William Heim, 

then residing near MifBintown, Juniata County, became the re- 
gular pastor of the congregation at Loysville, in May, 1815. In 
his journal of ministerial acts, Rev. Heim says : '' On the 18th 
of June, 1815, I preached the first time at Lchanon Church, from 
Matt. 9 : 13, and baptized an infant." He preached here regu- 
larly once every four weeks, and visited occasionally other con- 
gregations in Sherman's Valley. At St. Michael's Church, in 
Foutz's Valley, at Liverpool, and at the church near New Buffalo, 
all in Perry County, he commenced preaching in June, 1814 ; at 
Loysville in May, 1815; and in June, 1816, other congregations 
were added to these. Thus, in the minutes of Synod, held in 
Philadelphia, Pa., in June, 1816, it is said : "No. 1 is a letter 
from Sherman's Valley, in which the members of the congrega- 
tion in Toboyne Township (at Blain) request that they, besides 
other congregations, may be served by the Rev. Candidate Heim. 
On motion. Resolved, That Rev. Heim have permission to accept 
a call from these congregations." Rev. Heim was thus, by Synod, 



32 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

constituted the regular pastor of the congregation at Blain, Bloom- 
field, and St. Peter's, in Spring Township, in June, 181G; in 
short, he was now pastor of all the Lutheran congregations in 
Perry County, except the congregation in Fishing Creek Valley, 
in relation to which, in the minutes of the same session of Synod, 
we find the following action : '' No. 11 is a petition of the con- 
gregation in Sherman's Valley, Rye Township, in which the pe- 
titioners pray Synod to send them a minister. Resolved, That 
the pastor residing at Carlisle take charge of this congregation." 
The Rev. Benjamin Keller, of Carlisle, soon after united this 
congregation with his charge, and served it for a number of years 
successfully. 

The charge of Rev. Heim, from this time till 1828, embraced 
Mifflin County, Juniata County, and nearly the whole of Perry 
County ; and he must have preached for twelve or more regularly 
organized congregations, and visited occasionally some six or more 
preaching stations. To all these congregations he preached about 
once every four weeks in the German language, often on week 
days, and sometimes in the evening. He was never idle, and al- 
most always from home, following up his appointments from day 
to day. In 1816, he reported at Synod 170 infant baptisms, 107 
confirmations, 578 communicants, 14 funerals, and 3 schools. 
This report included the congregations he served in Mifflin and 
Juniata Counties. 

Under the pastoral supervision of Rev. Heira, the congregation 
at Loysville prospered exceedingly, especially up to about 1840. 
It is a matter of sincere regret that no church-records were kept 
here during his long and successful ministry. It is said that he 
made an entry of baptisms, confirmations, &c., for his own private 
use ; but unfortunately, after his death, nearly all his manuscript 
papers were scattered, torn to pieces, used for wrapping paper, 
and otherwise destroyed. His sermons in manuscript, of which 
there was a large number, went to ruin in the same way.* Hence, 

* So far as we know anything to the contrary, the only manuscript papers, 
from the hand of Kev. Haim, that were saved, were furnished us by his brother, 
Mr. J. George Heim, and consist of fifty-two skeletons of sermons, a journal 



CHAPTER I. 



33 



we are wholly dependent for dates-, names, and all other informa- 
tion, on the frail memories of the aged. Rev. Heim usually cate- 
chized once every three or four years, and then the young people 
came together from great distances all around, and the classes of 
catechumens were very large. The names of not one-third of 
those he confirmed at this place can now be remembered, nor is 
the time of their confirmation in all cases certain. 

Rev. Heim says : " On the 16th of October, 1815, 1 catechized 
the young people at Lebanon Church." And afterwards he 
says : " On the 9th of December, 1815, at Lebanon Church, I 
held the preparatory exercises with the catechumens and mem- 
bers." The following persons are a few of those who were con- 
firmed this time : 



Daniel Hall, 
Jacob Bender, 
Abraham Kistler, 
David Tressler, 
Henry Stambaugh, 
Jacob Wormley, 
George Wormley, 
George Titzel, 
John Titzel, 
John Loy, 
Elizabeth Titzel, 



Catharine Titzel, 
Henry Swarner, 

Mrs. Hall, 

Salome Tressler, 
Mary Billman, 
Sarah Ebert, 
Susanna Garling, 
Esther Bower, 
Rebecca Bower, 
Sarah Kremer, 
Elizabeth Kremer, 



Miss Stidel, 

'' Stidel, 

" Stidel, 

Elizabeth Loy, 
Catharine Bernheisel, 
Mary Bernheisel, 
Christiana Bernheisel, 
Lydia Minich, 
Rebecca Tressler, 
Barbara Shissel. 



In his journal, Rev. Heim says : " On the 12th of February, 
1817, I baptized two infants at Lebanon Church, and commenced 
catechizing a class of catechumens." Afterwards he adds : " On 
Sunday, the 6th of April, 1817, at Lebanon Church, I confirmed 
the catechumens, administered the Lord's Supper, and baptized 
four infants." This was the second class of catechumens he con- 



of his ministerial acts from June, 1814, to May, 1817, a part of a system on 
doctrinal theology, and a catalogue of the funerals he attended from 1814 to 
September, 1826. These papers are now in our hands, and the Journal, es- 
pecially, has furnished us with many important data. 



34 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

firmed here, consisting of about sixty persons, some of whom were 
the following : 

John Tressler, Margaretta Rice, 

John Beaver, Magdalene Ickes, 

John Kistler, Christiana Stambaugh, 

Jacob Bernheisel, Sarah Tressler, 

John Weary, Rebecca Tressler, 

Joseph Tressler, Elizabeth Shoemaker, 

Barbara Smith, Mrs. Frey. 

At the meeting of Synod in June, 1819, at Baltimore, Md., 
Rev. Heim was permanently ordained as a minister of the Gospel. 
At this time he reported 8 congregations, 246 infant baptisms, 
83 confirmations, 507 communicants, 17 funerals, and 8 schools. 
This report included the congregations he served in Juniata and 
Mifflin Counties, though not the preaching stations, of which he 
visited as many, perhaps more, than he had regularly organized 
congregations. 

In the spring of 1821 (?), Rev. Heim confirmed at Loysville 
a class of sevenfi/-one catechumens. The following persons are 
some of them : 

William Rice, William Snyder, 

Samuel Shoemaker, Michael Loy, 

George Billman, Michael Ickes, 

Jacob Shoemaker, Mr. Stoever, 

John Shoemaker, Mrs. Hench, 

Jacob C. Smith, '•' ReisdorflP, 

John Smith, Miss Tressler, 

Daniel Preissler, *' Sarah Rice, 

John Preissler, " Elizabeth Rice, 

Daniel Minich, " Catharine Briner, 

George Minich, , " Elizabeth Hartman, 

Conrad Comp, " Mary Shoemaker, 

Samuel Hench, " Sarah Smith, 

Daniel Hallman, " Catharine Fusselman, 

Samuel Kistler, '' Sarah Fox, 



CHAPTER I, 



35 



Moses Hall, 
Henry Long, 
George Bernheiselj 
Jacob Bender, 
George Orris, 

In 1822, Michael Loy 



Miss Mary Fox, 
" Mary Bower, 
" Hannah Bower, 

" Orris, 

« Orris. 



to "the Trustees of the German 
Lutheran and Presbyterian congregation of Lebanon Church, in 
Tyrone Township," eighty perches for one dollar. Vide, Deed 
Booh A, p. 418. This land was bought to enlarge the graveyard. 
At this time the congregation was evidently in a highly pros- 
perous state. In April, 182-1 (?), between sixty-five and seventy 
persons were admitted to full communion by the rite of confirma- 
tion. The followinsr were some of them : 



Conrad Rice, 
Jonathan Minich, 
Jacob Loy, -4 -4 QQl 
Samuel Loy, -^-^^^'^ 
Martin Stambaugh, 
William Stmabaugh, 

Mr. Kincr, 

Mr. Gutshall, 

John Hohenshilt, 
John Ickes, 
William Trostel, 
Samuel Shull, 
William Kistler, 
John Long, 
Henry Orris, 
Jonas Rumpel, 
George Rumpel, 
Benjamin Fusselman, 
Peter Schaeffer, 
William Bitner, 
John Shoemaker, 
Benjamin Rice, 



71 



Miss Susan Ickes, 
" Elizabeth Loy, 
Sarah Shull, 
Catharine Shull, 
Elizabeth Hench, 
Hannah Kremer, 
Margaret Kremer, 
Sarah Titzel, 
Elizabeth Rubrecht, 
Elizabeth Kistler, 
Susan Bender, 
Catharine Bitner, 
Catharine Stambaugh, 
Mary Shuman, 
Margaret Kochenderfer, 
Hetta Dunkelberger, 
Elizabeth Tressler, 
Mary Fusselman, 
Sarah Wolf, 
Elizabeth Briner, 
Mary Smith, 
Mary Kleffman, 



36 OnURCIIES BETAVEEN TEE MOUNTAINS. 

Mrs. Shoemaker, Miss Mary Crist, 

*' Elizabeth Bender, " Sarah Crist, 

Miss Mary Minich, " Mary Shoemaker. 
" Elizabeth Ebert, 

At the meeting of the Pennsylvania Synod, held at Reading, 
in May, 1825, Rev. Heim reported 8 congregations, 235 infiint 
baptisms, 47 confirmations, 609 communicants, 43 deaths, and 8 
schools. In September, 1825, Mr. Solomon Bower, of Blain, as 
lay delegate of the charge, accompanied Rev. Heim to the firt^t 
convention of the West Pennsylvania Synod, held at Chambers- 
burg, Pa. After the organization of this Synod, all the Lutheran 
congregations in Pennsylvania, west of the Susquehanna, were 
attached to it. Hence, when we hereafter refer to Synod, wc 
mean the West Pennsylvania Synod. 

In the spring of 1826, being Easter, at Loysville, Rev. Heim 
confirmed a class of catechumens, consisting of about forty per- 
sons. The following are some who belonged to this class : 

Solomon Bernheisel, Miss Elizabeth Flickinger, 
Samuel Shuman, " Hetta Ickes, 

Daniel Long, " Elizabeth Ritter, 

Mr. Hollenbach, " Mary Fusselman, 

" Gutshall, " Mary Rice, 

George Hohenshilt, Abraham Trostel, 

Mr. Kich, John Shoemaker, 

Nicholas Bitner, John Baltozer, 

John Arnold, Miss Elizabeth Loy, . 
George Ernst, " Mary Reisinger, 

David Flickinger, " Frances Bernheisel, 

John Briner, '' Margaret Kochenderfer, 

Jonathan Briner, '' Esther Arnold, 

David Miller, " Margaret Clouser. 

Samuel Reisdorfi", 

In 1827, the congregations in Perry County, belonging to the 
Loysville charge, united in buying of George Loy fifteen acres of 
land, adjoining the church land, as a glebe. A house was erected 



CHAPTER I. 37 

on this parcel of land, which has since served as a parsonage; 
afterwards a barn was also built on this ground. Some five or 
six years ago the congregation sold a few acres of this land. 

The old Con.stitution of the church being lost, Rev. Heini 
wrote the following one in the German language : 

CONSTITUTION. 

In the name of the Father, of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. 
Amen. God is a God of order, and therefore everything that is 
to meet with His approbation and redound to His glory, must be 
done in the spirit of order, of love and peace. Whereas, the 
Constitution of the hereinafter named church and congregation is 
lost, we do hereby declare said first Constitution null and void in 
case it should ever be found ; and We, the church-council and 
church-members, solemnly covenant, on this the 8th of September, 
1827, strictly and conscientiously to observe the following Consti- 
tution : 

CHAPTER I. 

OF THE CHURCH, THE GRAVEYARD, AND THE SCHOOL-HODSE. 

Our Church, called Lebanon, built on ground given for the 
purpose by Martin Bernheisel and Michael Loy, containing two 
acres and forty-two perches, situate in Tyrone Township, Perry 
County, and State of Pennsylvania, is, and shall always remain, 
a Union Church, and shall so be used by the two religious deno- 
minations, namely, the Evangelical Lutheran and Evangelical 
Reformed, until, by mutual agreement, the one denomination 
purchase the right or interest of the other. In this church it 
shall never be permitted that any other doctrine be preached or 
set forth, than our Evangelical Lutheran and German Reformed, 
as contained in the Bible, the Augsburg Confession, and the Hei- 
delberg Catechism, in our German vernacular language. One 
denomination shall not interfere in the Divine worship of the 
other, but one shall worship on one Sunday and the other on the 
Sunday next following, except when there is a funeral, and then 
4 



38 CHURCnES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

that denomination to which the funeral belongs shall have the use 
of the church. 

The land on which the church and school-house are erected, 
together with the graveyard, is the perpetual and inalienable 
property of the above named congregations, deeded and assigned 
to their use, where to bury their dead in an orderly and Christian 
manner. No stranger, nor any one else, not paying to one of the 
above-named congregations, shall be allowed to bury his dead 
here, without first asking permission of the Trustees of the con- 
gregations, and paying for the ground what said Trustees may 
deem just and right; and the money so obtained shall be appro- 
priated to the use of the congregations. The documents, deeds, 
&c., of the land on which are erected the above church and school- 
house, shall be delivered to the Trustees for safe-keeping as soon 
as this Constitution is adopted and recorded in the Church-book. 

CHAPTER II. 

OF THE PASTORS. 

The pastors who preach in the above church must have entered 
the ministry in a regular way, as James says, chap. 3:1," Be 
not many teachers," and as also our Augsburg Confession teaches 
in Article 14. Further, they must stand in connection with one 
of our Lutheran or Reformed Synods, must preach the word in 
purity and sincerity, and adorn their profession with a godly life. 
Their election, or call, shall always be determined by the majority 
of votes cast, and the same shall be done in case they are to be 
dismissed. If complaint be made against the pastor, the words 
of Paul must be heeded, 1 Tim. 5 : 19, " Against an elder receive 
no accusation;" if, however, the cause of complaint be of a more 
serious nature, then the different degrees of Christian admonition, 
as specified in Matt. 18 : 15-17, must be observed : " If thy 
brother shall trespass against thee, go and tell him his fault 
between thee and him alone." 

Elections for pastors shall be conducted as follows : Each con- 



CHAPTER I. 39 

gregation shall elect its own pastor, and when necessary dismiss 
liim, without the interference of the other congregation ; the same 
shall also be observed in regard to his support. In case the con- 
gregations have, however, only one pastor, then both congregations 
shall unite in supporting him. And we feel ourselves under 
solemn obligation to give our pastors their salary annually, freely 
and cheerfully, according to the word of St. Paul, Heb. 13 : 16- 
17, " Tp do good, and to communicate, forget not," so that we 
may by their ministry and the grace of God be edified in all that 
is good and confirmed to eternal life. 



C II A P T E R I I I, 

OF THE CHURCH-COUNCIL. 

The Church-Council of the above congregations shall consist of 
the following officers : 

One Treasurer and one Secretary, each of whom shall serve 
fhree years. 

Two Trustees, one of each congregation, who shall serve three 
years. 

Two Elders, one of each congregation, who shall serve three 
years. 

Two Deacons, one of each congregation, who shall serve three 
years. 

Every year a new officer shall be elected, so that one of the old 
officers may remain in office. The old Church-Council may be 
re-elected. The duties of the officers are the following : 

1, The Triistees shall — a. Endeavor with the help of God, to 
set their own household and the whole congregation a worthy ex- 
ample by their Christian deportment, h. Take care that the deeds 
and other important documents of the church are preserved, 
c. That the property of the church be not injured or destroyed, 
and that the house of worship and other buildings belonging to 
the church, be kept in good repair, d. That Evangelical doctrine 



40 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

and Chi'istian discipline be maintained and perpetuated in the 
cliurch. 

2. The Elders shall — a. Set the church a truly Christian ex- 
ample, h. See to it that the debts of the church be paid, and 
her best interests promoted, c. Advance the interests of the 
schools by visiting them as often as possible, d. Settle discords 
and controversies in the church, and thus promote peace, e. If 
the pastor desire it, they shall accompany him in his visits to the 
sick. /. They shall keep an account of all moneys received and 
paid out, and in every proper way seek to promote the best in- 
terests of the church. 

3. The Deacons are — a. To aiford the congregation an example 
of a truly Christian life. h. To render all necessary aid in the 
services of the sanctuary and the administration of the sacraments. 
c. To collect the alms, keep a correct account of the money col- 
lected, and pay the same into the hands of the Treasurer, as often 
as he may deem it necessary for the good of the church, d. To 
see that according to God's command the minister is properly 
supported, and that during divine service all things be done 
decently and in order. 

Elections for officers, and all other congregational elections, 
shall be openly announced in the church, so that all who are en- 
titled to a vote, may have an opportunity to vote; and those 
persons who are elected by a majority of votes, shall, at the next 
meeting for divine worship, be installed by the pastor into their 
respective ofl&ces. Should any member of the Church-Council 
conduct himself unworthily (which may God forbid !), and so as 
to make his removal from office necessary, it shall in such case be 
the duty of the Church-Council to investigate the matter of com- 
plaint, and then to lay their action in the case before the whole 
congregation, whose duty it shall then be to decide in the matter. 

The congregational settlement shall be made annually, on Easter 
Monday, by the Church-Council, and an entry thereof shall be 
recorded in the Church-book. 



CHAPTER I. 



41 



CHAPTER IV. 



OF THE CHURCH-MEMBERS. 



Every one who would be a member of this church, must of 
necessity possess the following qualifications, and perform the 
duties here prescribed. He must, 

1. Have been admitted by confirmation to the Lord's Supper. 

2. Lead a truly Christian life, and set his household a good 
example. 

3. Promptly and cheerfully help to bear the expenses of the 
church, according to his ability. 

4. Willingly receive admonition from the Church-Council, or 
Pastor, when found in the wrong. 

5. In case a member commits a moral offence (which may God 
in mercy prevent !), so that the congregation consider him un- 
worthy of membership, or of participating in the celebration of 
the Lord's Supper, the Church-Council, together with the Pastor, 
shall then regularly investigate the chai'ges preferred, and if said 
charges are found well sustained, they shall then decide by vote 
whether such offender shall be debarred from the Lord's table — 
the Pastor has no vote unless there be a tie, and then he has the 
casting vote — and if the majority of votes are cast against such an 
offending member, he shall then be denied the privilege of coming 
to the table of the Lord, until he gives satisflictory evidence of 
true repentance for his sins, by a genuine reformation of his life, 
according to the order and requirements of the New Testament. 

To the above Constitution, We, the Church-Council and church- 
members, herewith subscribe our names : 



Henry Titzel, 
George Loy, 
Henry Shoemaker, 
Frederick Dumm, 
David Tressler, 
Henry Klein, 
John Loy, 



John Ritter, 
John Kretzing, 
Jacob Maul, 
Jacob Bernheisel, 
Henry Trostel, 
John Wormly, 



Michael Loy, 
Jacob Hartman, 
Joseph Tressler, 
Henry Kell, 
Adam Swarner, 
John Shatto. 



42 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

• The above Constitution has long since become obsolete, and on 
the basis of it, a few years ago, a new one was adopted, with the 
provision, that each congregation manage its own affairs, accord- 
ing to the government and discipline of the General Synod of 
each denomination. 

In April, 1828, Rev. Heim moved from near Mifflintown, 
Juniata County, to Loysville, Perry County, and took possession 
there of the parsonage bought the previous year; about this time, 
also, he ceased to preach at Lewistown, and in Decatur Township 
northeast of Lewistown, and, instead of those congregations, he 
soon after added to his charge the congregation in Fishing Creek 
Valley, and St. Andrew's (Shuman's) near Ickesburg, both in 
Perry County. Thus his pastoral labors in Mifflin County ceased. 
In 1830, Hev. George Yeager took charge of the congregation at 
Lewistown, and the churches therewith associated. 

In May, 1828, a class of about forty catechumens were at 
Loysville admitted to full communion by the rite of confirmation, 
of whom the' following were a few : 

Frederick Hartman, Miss Mary Stambaugh, 

John Trostel, " Susan Bernhcisel, 

Charles Dunkelberger, " Mary Zeigler, 

AVilliam Loy, '' Julian Kremer, 

Miss Phebe Shull, " Catharine Kremer, 

Miss Elizabeth Notestein, " Catharine Hallman, 

" Rebecca Rice, '' Mary Klein. 

" Hannah Dunkelberger, 

In October, 1828, Rev. Heim reported at Synod, convened at 
York, Pa., 8 congregations, 260 infant baptisms, 81 confirmations, 
606 communicants, 35 deaths, 6 schools, and §25 collected for 
the Synodieal Treasury. 

Mr. Casper Wolf, of the congregation at Loysville, as lay 
delegate of the charge, attended Synod in October, 1829, at Bed- 
ford, Pa. At this Convention of Synod, Rev. Heim reported 8 
congregations, 264 infant baptisms, 98 confirmations, 746 com- 



CHAPTER I. 43 

inunicants, 39 deaths, and 822 collected for the Treasury of 
Synod. At this time Synod organized an Education and Mis- 
sionary Society, of whose Executive Committee Mr. George Loy 
of Loysville was elected a member. Synod elected Rev. Heim 
to represent it, as delegate in the General Synod, whose sessions 
he also attended at Hagerstown, Md. He was a great friend and 
advocate of the General Synod. 

Though two classes of catechumens were confirmed at Loysville 
between 1828 and 1833, we have not been able to ascertain the 
number of each class, nor the names of those who were confirmed. 

In October, 1830, Mr. Nicholas Ickes, as delegate of the charge, 
accompanied Rev. Heim to Synod, held at Greencastle, Pa. At 
this time Rev. Heim reported 8 congregations, 267 infant bap- 
tisms, 65 confirmations, 684 communicants, 31 funerals, 8 week- 
day-schools, 4 Sunday-schools, and 825 14 for the Syuodical 
Treasury. He exerted himself very much to have a Sunday-school 
established in connection with each of his congregations, and 
gradually succeeded in his efforts. At this Convention of Synod 
he also heartily advocated the passage of the following resolution, 
which he religiously observed at home : ^'■Resolved, That we will 
observe the 21st of November, of this year, as a day of prayer for 
the extension of the kingdom of God, and the outpouring of the 
Holy Spirit upon the congregations in our charge." At this 
Convention of Synod he was elected a director of the Theological 
Seminary at Gettysburg, Pa., for the term of five years. As long 
as he lived, he took a deep interest in the prosperity of the insti- 
tutions of learning at Gettysburg. 

Synod convened in October, 1831, at Indiana, Indiana County, 
Pa., when Rev. Heim reported 8 congregations, 237 infant and 
40 adult baptisms, 38 confirmations, 648 communicants, 50 fune- 
rals, 8 week-day schools,. 4 Sunday-schools, and 825 20 collected 
for the Synodical Treasury. He also reported the following regular 
congregations as constituting his charge at this time, namely, 
Mifflin town, Tuscarora (near Perry ville, and both in Juniata 
County), Lebanon, Bloomfield, Zion (at Blain), St. Peter's, Liver- 
pool, and St. Michael's in Foutz's Valley. Besides these, he 



44 CHURCHES betaveen the mountains, 

also preached rea;ularly at Zion's Church in Fishing Creek Valley, 
and at St. Andrew's (Shunian's) near Ickesburg. Reiber's 
Church or school-house, in Perry County, was reported as vacant.* 

Synod convened at Hanover, York County, Pa., in October, 
1832. Mr. Philip Fusselman of the Loysville congregation took 
his seat in this convention as lay delegate of the charge. Rev. 
Heim was elected Treasurer of Synod. He reported this time 8 
congregations, 228 infant and 20 adult baptisms, 125 confirma- 
tions, 800 communicants, 33 funerals, 8 week-day schools, 6 Sun- 
day-schools, $20 for the Synodical Treasury, and $37 33 for mis- 
sionary and educational purposes. At this meeting of Synod, a 
committee reported as follows: "No. 7 is a petition of the con- 
gregation at Lewistown, praying Synod to enlarge that pastoral 
charge, and thus enable it to support a pastor. Your committee 
would recommend that this petition be read before Synod." The 
petition was read, and then Synod " Resolved, That Rev. Heim, 
at the expiration of his current pastoral year, cede the Mifflintowa 
and Tuscarora congregations to the Lewistown charge." With 
this resolution Rev. Heim complied at the close of .his current 
pastoral year, which was in May, 1833, and ceased also, at the 
same time, to preach at St. Michael's in Foutz's Valley and at 
Liverpool, so that, till the next meeting of Synod, his pastoral 
labors were wholly confined to that part of Perry County lying 
southwest of the Juniata. 

In 1832, Rev. Heim was chosen one of the first Trustees of 
Pennsylvania College, at Gettysburg, Pa. 

In the spring of 1833, a large class of catechumens was con- 
firmed at Loysville. Of this class the following are the only 
names that could be remembered : 

* Reiber's (German, Raiiber's) Church, or rather school-house, was built 
more than fifty years ago for church and school purposes, and the Lutherans 
had preaching here occasionally, and perhaps at times regularly, till about 
1830. It is located in Spring Township, an old-looking building, with an 
old and large graveyard adjoining it. Not Lutherans, but others still preach 
occasionally here. "When the Pisgah Church was built, about two miles east 
of Reiber's, the members generally united with the former, and abandoned 
the latter as worth very little. 



CHAPTER I. 45 

F. W. Heini, Miss Mary Wolf, 

Levi Hollenbach, " Julian Sliaeffer, 

William Bernheisel, " Frances Ebert, 

Joseph Duukelbergei', " Mary A. Billman, 

John Stump, " Margaret Burrell, 

Henry Titzel, " Mary A. Ickes, 

Miss Catharine Heim, " Maria Wormley. 
" Elizabeth Briner, 

After the confirmation of this class, we have not been able to 
ascertain the names and numbers of the four or five large classes 
of catechumens who were admitted to communion in the interval 
between 1833 and 1843. 

In October, 1833, Synod met at Mifflinburg, Union County, 
Pa. Mr. Henry Shoemaker, as lay delegate, represented the 
charge. Bev. Heim reported 4 congregations,* 257 infant and 
11 adult baptisms, 41 confirmations, 783 communicants, 27 fu- 
nerals, 4 week-day schools, 4 Sunday-schools, 624 93 collected 
for the Treasury of Synod, and 829 10 J for missionary and bene- 
ficiary educational purposes. In the minutes of this convention 
of Synod, we find the following action on two petitions from Ju- 
niata County : 

" Two petitions from the congregations at Mifflintown and Tus- 
carora were presented. The first, subscribed by forty members 
of said congregations, prays Synod to annul the resolution on their 
minutes of last year, according to which. Rev. Mr. Heimwas no 
longer to serve those congregations, and to grant them the privi- 
lege of retaining him as their pastor. The second petition, also 
subscribed by thirty-nine members of the same congregations, 
praying for the service of Rev. Mr. Weyl, of Lewistown. Dele- 
gates from these congregations being present, and after hearing 

* "Why he did not, at this time, report six congregations, we cannot tell. 
He certainly preached regularly to the following organized congregations, 
viz. : Zion at Blain, Loysville, St. Peter's, St. Andrew's, Bloomfield, and 
Mount Zion on Fishing Creek. It may be he considered two of these con- 
gregations as only preaching stations. 



4G CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

the grounds of their petitions, and duly considering all the cir- 
cumstances, on motion, it was 

'' Resolved, That Rev. Mr. Heim continue to preach for these 
congregations in the Gemnan language, and that Rev. Mr. Weyl 
serve them in the English language." 

According to this action of Synod, Rev. Heim preached once 
more, but only during the ensuing year, in Juniata County. 

Synod met in October, 1834, at Somerset, Pa. Mr. Samuel 
Ickes attended as delegate from the Loysville charge. Rev. 
Heim reported 6 congregations, 153 infant and 2 adult bap- 
tisms, 94 confirmations, 666 communicants, 23 funerals, 5 week- 
day schools, 4 Sunday-schools, Sll for the Synodical Treasury, 
and 834 for missionary and educational purposes. The Seminary 
at Gettysburg being then somewhat embarrassed with debt, on 
the circulation of a subscription among the members of Synod, 
Rev. Heim put down his name for one hundred dollars towards 
meeting the wants of that theological institution. At this session 
of Synod, two petitions were also handed in, and disposed of as 
follows : 

"1. A petition from the Miflflintown and Tuscarora congrega- 
tions, with forty-six names appended, praying Synod to grant them 
permission to call a minister who can preach in both languages. 
2. A petition from the same congregations, subscribed by forty- 
six communing members, praying for permission to continue the 
Rev. Mr. Heim as their pastor. After much consultation on the 
contents of these letters and the petitions of the congregations, 
during which the brethren fully expressed their views, on motion 
it was 

^^ Resolved, That Synod recommend to both brethren, Rev. J. 
W. Heim and Rev. C Weyl, to give up said congregations at the 
end of the year, so that, in connection with other congregations, 
a new pastorate may be formed ; provided, however, that Brother 
Weyl continue to visit the congregations until the end of Brother 
Ileim's year." 

In accordance with this recommendation of Synod, Rev. Heim 
ceased to preach in Juniata County, and to the time of his death 



CHAPTER T. 47 

he confined his pastoral labors exclusively to Perry County, serv- 
ing the following congregations, viz., Zion's, at Blain; Lebanon, 
atLoysville; St. Peter's, in Spring Township; Christ's, at Bloom- 
field ; St. Andrew's, near Ickesburg ; Mount Zion, in Fishing 
Creek Valley ; to which he added St. John's, near Markelville, in 
1840, and Ludolph's (Germany), near EUiottsburg, in 1842. 
Besides these congregations, he preached also occasionally at 
preaching stations. It is inconceivable how he could do justice to 
himself and so many and remote congregations. 

Mr. John Wormley, of the Loysville congregation, as delegate, 
attended Synod in October, 1835, at Mechanicsburg, Cumberland 
County, Pa. Rev. Heim reported at this convention 4 congrega- 
tions, 193 infant and 4 adult baptisms, 39 confirmations, 729 com- 
municants, 23 deaths, 3 Sunday-schools, $9 20 for the Synodical 
Treasury, and $23 65 for the missionary and educational causes. 

In October, 1836, Mr. Henry Shoemaker, of the Loysville con- 
gregation, attended Synod as delegate at Lewistown, Pa. Rev. 
Heim now reported 6 congregations, 147 infant and 3 adult bap- 
tisms, 21 confirmations, 530 communicants, 36 funerals, 3 Sun- 
day-schools, $13 032- collected for the Treasury of Synod, and 
824 for the cause of missions. 

Mr. David Tressler, of the congregation at Bloomfield, attended 
Synod as delegate in September, 1837, at Blairsville, Indiana 
County, Pa. At this convention of Synod, Rev. Heim reported 
6 congregations, 200 infant and 3 ad.ult baptisms, 31 confirma- 
tions, 611 communicants, 38 funerals, 5 Sunday-schools, $13 37i 
collected for the Synodical Treasury, $5 for missions, and $18 81 
for educational purposes. From the minutes of this session of 
Synod, we learn that some persons at Loysville preferred charges 
against Father Heim. The nature of the charges does not ap- 
pear. A committee was appointed by Synod to meet at Loysville 
on the 14th of November, 1837. This committee consisted of 
Rev. J. G. Schmucker, D.D., Rev. B. Keller, Rev. N. Stroh, and 
Rev. D. Gottwalt, and Messrs. Sener, of Carlisle, and Hoff'man, 
of Mechanicsburg. These gentlemen met at the time and place 
designated, and after having carefully investigated the matter of 



48 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

complaint, they pronounced Father Heini clear of all blame, and 
censured his accusers. The action of the committee was after- 
wards approved and confirmed by Synod. 

In October, 1838, as delegate, Mr. Henry Shoemaker attended 
Synod at New Berlin, Union County. As the manuscript pro- 
ceedings of this session of Synod were lost, and only a sketch of 
them was reproduced from memory. Rev. Heini's report does not 
appear. 

Synod convened in October, 1839, at York, Pa. Mr. Henry 
Grubb attended as delegate from the charge of Father Heim, who 
reported 6 congregations, 183 infant and 3 adult baptisms, 41 
confirmations, 633 communicants, 25 funerals, 3 Sunday-schools, 
S18 12^ for the Treasury of Synod, and 828 for the cause of be- 
neficiary education. 

Synod met in Pittsburg, Pa., in October, 1840. Father Heim 
did not attend this convention, nor send a report of his ministerial 
acts during the year. This was the only instance, during his long 
ministry, that he failed to take his seat in the annual Synodical 
convention. But the distance this time was great, and age was 
also beginning to make its mai-k on his robust body. Hence he 
stayed at home, and was for so doing cheerfully excused by his 
brethren in the ministry. 

Mr. D. Minich, of Loysville, as delegate, attended Synod at 
Boalsburg, Centre County, in October, 1841, when Father Heim 
reported 6 congregations, 188 infant and 3 adult baptisms, 53 
confirmations, 679 communicants, 25 funerals, 3 Sunday-schools, 
S26 25 collected for beneficiary education, 818 for missionary pur- 
poses, and $18 38 for the Synodical Treasury. 

In September, 1842, Synod held its sessions at Bloomfield, 
Perry County, in Rev. Heim's charge. Mr. David Tressler, as 
delegate, represented the charge in Synod. Father Heim reported 
6 congregations, 139 infant and 3 adult baptisms, 15 confirma- 
tions, 568 communicants, 1 Sunday-school, 88 collected for the 
Treasury of Synod, 88 for missions, and 88 for beneficiary education. 

In the spring of 1843, a class of catechumens was confirmed 
at Loysville. The following were a few of this class : 



CHAPTER I. 49 

William Lutman, Miss Mary A. Tressler, 
John Swarner, " Eliza Tressler, 

John Tressler, " Sarah Tressler, 

David Evans, " Elizabeth Kistler, 

Mrs. Bausum, " Mary Snyder, 

Miss Caroline Tressler, " Eliza Bausum. 

Synod convened in October, 1843, at Aaronsburg, Centre 
County. Mr. Solomon Bernheisel, as delegate of the Loysville 
charge, took his seat as a member of this convention of Synod. 
Father Heim reported 6 congregations, 155 infant and 2 adult 
baptisms, 31 confirmations, 682 communicants, 16 funerals, 4 
Sunday-schools, $6 collected for the Synodical Treasury, $10 for 
beneficiary education, SIO for missions, and $5 for the Theological 
Seminary. 

Mr. Daniel Foulk, of the congregation at Bloomfield, as dele- 
gate, attended Synod at Hanover, York County, in October, 1844. 
As the proceedings of convention of Synod were not published in 
pamphlet form, we have not at hand Rev. Heim's parochial re- 
port. 

In September, 1845, Synod met at Carlisle, Pa. Mr. J. Zim- 
merman attended this convention as delegate of the charge. 
Father Heim reported 6 congregations, 125 infant and 3 adult 
baptisms, 39 confirmations, 816 communicants, 29 funerals, 5 
Sunday-schools, $9 35 for Treasury of Synod, $15 12^ for educa- 
tion, $15 17 for home missions, $7 83 for foreign missions, and 
$5 for the Professors' Fund of the Seminary at Gettysburg. 

As delegate of the charge, Mr. George Beistlein attended 
Synod at Chambersburg, Pa., in September, 1846. This time 
Father Heim reported 6 congregations, 108 infant and 3 adult 
baptisms, 61 confirmations, 764 communicants, 18 funerals, 5 
Sunday-schools, $5 30 collected for Synod's Treasury, $25 for 
beneficiary education, $5 for home missions, and $5 for foreign 
missions. 

Synod convened in September, 1847, at Mifl3inburg, Union 
County. Mr. J. Dunkelberger, as delegate, took his seat in this 



50 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

convention. Rev. Heim reported 6 congregations, 124 infant 
and 1 adult baptisms, 32 confirmations, 747 communicants, 22 
funerals, 6 Sunday-schools, $10 collected for the Treasury of 
Synod, $32 81 for education, $18 70 for home missions, and 
$12 73 for foreign missions. 

In May, 1848, Rev. Heim confirmed at Loysville a class of 
catechumens (the last class he confirmed here), consisting of the 
following sixteen persons : 

Samuel Culler, Miss Frances Minich, 

Rudolphus J. Heim, " Sarah Brincr, 

Samuel Kistler, " Margaret Briner, 

John Gr. Loy, " Mary Briner, 

Samuel Tressler, " Ann Loy, 

Mr. Comp, " Caroline Swab, 

Mr. Comp, " Lydia Kunkel, 

Miss Sarah Tressler, " Yohn. 

Synod met at East Berlin, Adams County, in September, 1848, 
when Mr. Wm. Messinger, as delegate, represented the Loysville 
charge, and Father Heim reported 6 congregations, 129 infant 
and 1 adult baptisms, 79 confirmations, 843 communicants, 34 
funerals, 6 Sunday-schools, $10 for Synod's Treasury, $33 83 for 
education, $15 44 for home missions, and $7 33 for foreign mis- 
sions. 

In September, 1849, Synod convened at York, Pa., Mr. Henry 
Shoemaker, as delegate, represented the Loysville charge. At 
this convention of Synod Rev. Heim reported 6 congregations, 
100 infant baptisms, 10 confirmations, 712 communicants, 23 
funerals, 9 Sunday-schools, $5 12 J collected for the Synodical 
Treasury, $38 87J for beneficiary education, $13 for home mis- 
sions, and $10 for foreign missions. This was the last time the 
Lord granted Father Heim the delightful privilege of meeting his 
ministerial brethren in Synodical convention. 

As no church-records were kept by any of the congregations 
whilst Rev. Heim was pastor of them, we supposed it would be 
most satisfactory to the reader to have before him the annual 



/ 



CHAPTER I. 51 

parochial reports made at Synod by Father Heini. An idea of 
his labors and success, and of the condition and growth of the 
congregations, can thus be formed far better than from vague and 
general statements. These reports, are, moreover, an important 
item in the history of the Loysville charge, as it then was, and 
they tell their story flir better and more truthfully than can be 
done by any attempt on our part. From them, each one can draw 
his own inferences. For our part, we say, "Well done, thou 
good and faithful servant." 

Father Heim prosecuted his labors with unabated zeal to the 
end of his sojourn on earth. According to a resolution of the 
last session of Synod, the last sermon he preached to his congre- 
gations was on the sanctification of the Sabbath, a subject well 
suited for one who was himself soon to exchange labor on earth 
for eternal rest in heaven. We have often heard this discourse 
spoken of as one of his ablest and most successful pulpit efforts. 
His labors were soon to end, and for him the day of rest was near 
at hand. 

Some time in the fall of 1849, the subject of building a new 
church at Loysville was agitated by the members. At times, 
especially during communion seasons, the old church was too 
small, in winter it was uncomfortable, and in general it had be- 
come dilapidated. A general congregational meeting was called, 
and the subject of building a new church was discussed. A 
diversity of opinion prevailed : some thought the old church was 
good enough ; others were for repairing it; but the majority were 
in favor of building a new one. Father Heim was present. 
During the discussions a messenger came for him to attend a 
funeral. Before leaving, he arose and feelingly addressed the 
meeting, in substance, as follows : 

" Brethren : The object for which you have met is a good and 
important one. The enemy of the church of Jesus Christ wants 
no more new houses erected for the true worship of the true Grod, 
and he is without doubt present to defeat the glorious enterprise 
in which you are about to engage. I exhort you not to give heed 
to his wicked suggestions, but to go forward hand in hand, trust- 



52 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

ing in God, and seeking his glory in the erection of a new house 
to His name and for His worship." 

This short, but appropriate address from their aged pastor had 
the desired effect. Before the meeting adjourned, all were agreed 
to build a new church. Father Heim saw the subscriptions for 
the new church taken, and put his own name down for fifty dol- 
lars, which were paid out of his estate after his death. 

The time for Father Heim's departure had now fully come. 
After languishing on a bed of sickness for a few days, he fell 
asleep in Jesus and in peace, on Thursday evening, the 27th of 
December, -1849, aged 67 years, 4 months, and 19 days, having 
served the congregation at Loysville, as pastor, thirty-four years 
and ahout four months. 

" Sweet is the scene where Christians die, 
Where holy souls retire to. rest ; 
How mildly beams the closing eye! 

How gently heaves th' expiring breast ! 

" So fades a summer cloud away ; 

So sinks the gale when storms are o'er; 
So gently shuts the eye of day; 
So dies a wave along the shore. 

" Triumphant smiles the victor's brow, 

Fann'd by some guardian angel's wing. 
grave ! where is thy victory now ? 

And where, death I is now thy sting?" 

As the life, character and death of Father Heim are fully 
detailed in another chapter of this work, we will proceed with our 
narrative. 

In February, 1850, a convention of delegates from the congre- 
gations Father Heim had served, and those under the pastoral 
care of Rev. J. Martin, was called to meet in Bloomfield. The 
congregations composing the Liverpool charge, were at this time 
served by Rev. William Weaver, and were not embraced in this 
call. The following are the proceedings of this convention. 

" According to notice previously given, the congregations (by 
their representatives), composing the charge of the late Rev. J. 



CHAPTER I. 53 

W. Heira, and those at present under the care of Rev. J. Martin, 
met in convention in the Borough of Bloomfield, Perry County, 
Pa., on Friday the 18th of February, 1850, in the morning, at 
11 o'clock, for the purpose of taking into consideration the pro- 
priety of arranging said congregations into three diiferent pastor- 
ates. A hymn having been sung, and prayer offered by Mr. E,. 
Adams, the Convention was temporarily organized by calling Mr. 
Samuel Shuman to the Chair, and appointing Col. John Tressler, 
Secretary. 

'' The credentials of the delegates were then called for, and it 
was found that twenty-eight delegates were in attendance, repre- 
senting fourteen congregations. After a short time had been 
spent in consultation, prayer was again offered, and the Conven- 
tion adjourned to meet in the afternoon at half-past one o'clock. 

''The Convention met according to adjournment, and was opened 
with prayer. On motion, the Convention was permanently organ- 
ized by continuing Mr. Samuel Shuman, as Chairman, and Col. 
J. Tressler, as Secretary. 

"A motion was now made and seconded, that the congregations 
represented in this Convention, be so arranged as to make three 
different charges. After a lengthy discussion, the vote was taken, 
and the motion was decided in the affirmative. The question 
then arose. How shall these congregations be divided, so that their 
arrangement may be as judicious as possible ? A plan of division 
was then submitted, which, after some discussion, was finally 
adopted, viz. : 

" The upper, or Loysville charge, to be composed of the following 
congregations : Zion, Lebanon, St. Peter's, and Germany (Lu- 
dolph's) churches. 

"The middle, or Bloomfield charge, to be composed of Ickesburg 
(stone church), Shuman's, Bealor's, Bloomfield, and Newport. 

"The lower, or Petersburg charge, to be composed of Pisgah, 
Fishing Creek, Billow's, Petersburg, and New Buffalo Churches. 
On motion, 

^^ Resolved, That the proceedings be signed by the officers, and 
5* 



54 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

that the Secretary cause an abstract of the same to be published 
iu the Lutheran Observer aud Kirchenhote. 

"Samuel Shuman, 

" Chairman. 

" Jno. Tressler, 

" Secretary."* 

The LoysviUe Charge, as reorganized hy the above Convention. 

After the death of Father Heim, the Loysville charge was 
vacant about ten months, and as reorganized, consisted now of 
four congregations. Hitherto the Loysville congregation, as well 
as all the other congregations of the charge, had preaching ex- 
clusively in the German language. Father Heim was unfriendly 
to the introduction of the English language in divine worship in 
his congregations. On this point he made a sad mistake, though 
he no doubt thought his course in the matter was right. In Oc- 
tober, 1850, the 

Rev. Frederick Rulhranff, 

of Milton, Pa., having accepted a call from the charge, entered 
on the discharge of his pastoral duties. Without delay, he intro- 
duced the use of the English language in worship in all the con- 
gregations of his charge. This was a measure much needed, and 
for want of it the growth of the congregations had been for a long 
time greatly retarded. 

THE NEW CHURCH. 

This church was commenced in the spring of 1850. The corner- 
stone was laid on the 23d of June, the same year, by Rev. S. S. 
Schmucker, D.D., of the Theological Seminary at Gettysburg, who 
preached on the occasion an appropriate sermon in a grove a 
short distance north of the site of the church, and deposited in 
the corner-stone a copy of the Bible in German and English, 
German and English hymn-books and catechisms of both congre- 

* See Lutheran Observer, Feb. 22, 1850. 



CHAPTER I. 55 

gations, a copy of the Lutheran Observer and of the German 
Reformed Messenger, a copy of each of the Perry County news- 
papers, a list of the names of subscribers, and a copy of the con- 
gregational constitution of 1827. The ministers present on this 
occasion were Rev. Dr. Schmucker and Rev. J. Martin, Lu- 
theran, and Rev. C. H. Leinbach, and Rev. A. H. Kremer, 
German Reformed, and perhaps others. Messrs. John Tressler, 
Solomon Bernheisel, George Billman, Lutherans, and Jacob Bern- 
heisel, Daniel Ritter, Jacob Shearer, German Reformed, were 
the building-committee. Messrs. George ShaefFer and George 
Wetzel did the carpenter work; Messrs. David Shearer and John 
Shearer did the stone and brick work; Mr. Israel Messimer did 
the plastering, and Mr. John Newcomer the painting. The 
church is 6-5 feet long and 48 feet wide. On Sunday, the 2d of 
March, 1851, the church was consecrated. The ministers present 
on this occasion were Rev. F. Ruthrauff, pastor. Rev. B. Kurtz, 
D.D., Rev. J. Martin, Rev. M. J. Alleman, Lutheran, and Rev. 
C. H. Leinbach, pastor, Rev. J. F. Mesick, Rev. N. Gehr, Ger- 
man Reformed. Though the church is large, on this occasion 
all assembled could not be accommodated. Some withdrew to 
the school-house close by, where Rev. Alleman preached for them, 
whilst Rev. Dr. Kurtz preached the dedicatory sermon in the 
church. On the morning of the day of consecration, a debt of 
nearly one thousand dollars still rested on the church. An appeal 
was made to the audience, and in the forenoon about $760 were 
obtained in subscriptions and otherwise, and in the evening about 
$300 more. The church has an end gallery, and will seat some 
sis or seven hundred persons. The basement is divided into 
several apartments, for Sunday-schools and pastor's study. The 
edifice is surmounted by a steeple, containing a bell weighing 955 
pounds. The church, fixtures, and bell, cost about $6000, the 
whole of which, we believe, is now paid. The church is con- 
venient internally, and has an imposing appearance externally. 
It is a Union church, that is, it is owned jointly by the Lutherans 
and German Reformed. 

At the time this church was dedicated, and in regard to Union 



56 CHURCHES between the mountains. 

churches, the editor of the Lutheran Observer made the follow- 
ing judicious remarks, which we cannot refrain from introducing 
here. " We regret," says the editor, " to find that they (the 
congregations at Loysville) have built a Union church, because it 
is so very difi&cult, when pastors and people of different denomi- 
nations are thus circumstanced, to 'keep the unity of the spirit in 
the bond of peace.' This evil has long been felt, and hence the 
Synods of both churches have passed resolutions, disapproving of 
and dissuading from the erection of houses of worship of this kind. 
If even harmony should prevail while the two use the same build- 
ing in common, the period will ultimately arrive, when the wants 
of the two will demand separate houses of worship; then the 
trouble, and perhaps even litigation, will arise in dividing the 
property. We have heard of so many melancholy instances of 
this kind, that we are surprised that both German Reformed and 
Lutherans have not profited sufficiently to guard against all such 
causes of inconvenience and contention. One object aimed at in 
erecting Union churches, is to save expenses; but it is a saving 
which tends to strife and spiritual poverty, and ought not to be 
encouraged." Would that all heeded these words of admonition ! 
This was the last Union church, or more correctly, disunion 
church, the Lutherans helped to erect in Perry County, and our 
fervent prayer is, that it may continue the last ! 

When Rev. Ruthrauff took charge of the Loysville pastorate, 
he induced each congregation to make regular entries in the 
church records. Discipline was also introduced, and in general, 
the aifairs of the congregations were conducted in a way far better 
than had hitherto been customary. He was an able minister of 
the Gospel, and infused into his people that proper respect for 
their own church, which they very much lacked before, and some 
do yet. He catechized the young almost constantly, was faithful 
and useful. Though now dead, he started influences for good 
that will never die. 

On the 3d of May, 1851, at Loysville, the following persons 
were admitted to full communion by the solemn rite of confirma- 
tion : 



CHAPTER I. 57 

John B. Zimmerman, Julian Bausum, 

John Arnold, Elvina M. Bernheisel, 

Samuel Rinehart, Caroline C. Bernheisel, 

John Swab, Catharine E. Kepner, 

John G. Kiner, Sarah A. Billman, 

David Metz, Eliza Minich, 

Israel Messimer, Diana Minich, 

Jeremiah "W. Kiner, Catharine Hopple, 

George Peek, Matilda Shock, 

John Hollenbach, Margaret Shock, 

Jacob Bausum, Margaret Metz, 

Elizabeth Zimmerman, Susanna Metz. 

On the 20th of September, 1851, John Kistler and Mrs. Louisa 
Loy (baptized) were admitted to full communion by confirmation, 
and Joseph Abrams and Mrs. Amanda Abrams were received by 
certificate from the Lutheran church of Rev. D. H. Focht in 
Franklin County. 

On the 30th of May, 1852, Victor George Tressler and John 
Minich were admitted to full communion by the rite of confirma- 
tion. 

In September, 1852, Col. John Tressler, as delegate, repre- 
sented the Loysville charge in Synod, convened at Mechanicsburg, 
Cumberland County. He was elected by Synod as one of its lay 
delegates to the General Synod, to be held at Winchester, Va., in 
May, 1853. He attended this convention of the General Synod. 

The above, as to the number of accessions to the congregation, 
is the result of Rev. Ruthrauff's labors here ; but it is by no 
means the whole of the good those labors produced in the congre- 
gation. Eternity alone can fully disclose the happy effects his 
influence had on many souls. Having served the Loysville charge 
about two years, he resigned in November, 1852, and accepted a 
call from Centre County.* The charge waa then vacant about 
four months. 

* Por a satisfactory sketch of the life and labors of Rev. F. Euthrauff, see 
" The Evangelical Review," vol. xiii, pp. 570-581. 



58 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

Rev. Reuben Weiser 

of Chambersbui'g, Pa., then accepted a call from the charge and 
commenced his pastoral labors on the 1st of April, 1853. At 
this time about one-half of the preaching was required in the 
German language, and one-half in the English. Rev. Weiser 
preached both with success. 

In September, 1853, Col. John Tressler, as delegate, attended 
Synod at Lewistown, Pa, 

On the 16th of May, 1854, Rev. Weiser admitted the follow- 
ing persons to full communion by confirmation : 

James R. Lackey, Miss Margaret Stuber, 

Henry T. Swarner, " Mary M. Swab, 

Mrs. Sarah Bausum, John R. Delancy, | received by 

Miss Sarah M. Weiser, Benj. Wormley, j certificate. 
" Elizabeth Ewing, 

In September, 1854, Mr. Solomon Bower of Blain, as delegate, 
represented the charge in Synod, held at Shrewsbury, York 
County, Pa. 

The Synod of Central Pennsylvania \^diii organized in February, 
1855, at Aaronsburg, Centre County. As Perry County was em- 
braced within the bounds of this Synod, of course the congrega- 
tions in the county became connected with this Synod. Mr. John 
B. Zimmerman, as delegate, attended the convention called for 
the organization of the Synod of Central Pennsylvania. 

Early in the spring of 1855, George llempfer. Miss Catharine 
V. Weiser, and it may be some others, were admitted to com- 
munion by confirmation. The names of this class of catechumens 
were not recorded in the Church-book. 

In May, 1855, i\i(i first annual convention of Synod of Central 
Pennsylvania was held at Mifilintown, Juniata County. As dele-- 
gate of the Loysville charge, Mr. Solomon Bower attended this 
convention of Synod. 

Having served the charge about two years and a half. Rev. 
Weiser preached his farewell sermon at Loysville, on the 16th of 



CHAPTER I. 59 

September, 1855, from Acts 20 : 22. He accepted the Presi- 
dency of Central College of Iowa. The charge was now vacant 
about six months. During this time St. Paul's Lutheran Church 
in Madison Township, consecrated in December, 1855, was added 
to the charge. On the 25th of May, 1856, the 

Rev. Philip Willard 

of Danville, Montour County, Pa., having accepted a call from the 
charge, entered on the discharge of his pastoral labors here. He 
had five congregations to serve, and the charge was now large and 
required hard labor. Rev. Willard applied himself to his task 
with energy, being " instant in season and out of season," and 
the Lord owned and crowned his labors with abundant success. 
Immediately he commenced instructing a class of catechumens at 
Loysville in the doctrines of our holy Christianity, and on the 21st 
of September, 1856, the following persons were admitted to full 
communion by the rite of confirmation : 

John M. Rice, Miss Oath. A. Heim, 

Andrew T. Kistler, " Sarah Shatto, 

William H. Rice, " Mary Sosseman, 

William Minich, " Nancy Sosseman, 

Emanuel Freeman, " Catharine Wolf, 

Absalom Swarner, " Elizabeth Wolf, 

Jacob' Wolf, " Rebecca Stuber, 

George W. Kepner, " Mary J. Stidel, 

David L. Rice, " Mary E. Kepner, 

Miss Rebecca Kistler, " Catharine Weaver, 

" Catharine Rice, " Matilda J. Loy (baptized). 

" Elvina Heim, 

Rev. Willard labored with untiring zeal, and the Lord gave 
him favor with the people. The word had free course, run, and 
was glorified. All the congregations of the charge were revived 
and sinners were converted to God. In the Lutheran Observer, 
Nov. 2\st, 1856, we read, ^'■Revival: We learn that a work of 



bU cnuRcnES between the mountains. 

grace is in progress in the church at Andesville (Loysville), I 
under the care of Brother Willard. Many have ah-eady been 
added to the church, and many others are preparing to join.' 
Again, in the same paper, March 27th, 1857, it is said: "Rev 
P. Willard, of Andesville (Loysville), has been in a constant re 
vival since early last fall. Hundreds have been hopefully con 
verted. By the expiration of his first year in his present charge 
he will have added upwards of two hundred souls to his member 
ship by confirmation, independently of an equal number of dead 
and delinquent members who have been revived.'' 

Rev. Willard, " as his manner was," visited from house to 
house, "reasoning with them out of the Scriptures," and cate- 
chizing and preaching almost incessantly, and everywhere sinners 
were awakened and the hearts of Christians made glad. On the 
5th of April, 1857, the following persons were at Loysville ad- 
mitted to full communion by confirmation : 

David L. Tressler, Miss Eliz. E. Hollenbach, 

Josiah E. Tressler, " Sarah Schwab, 

John Wolf, " Susan Baughraan, 

Andrew Comp, " Isabella Billman, 

Jacob Rempfer, " Mary E. Shope, 

David Bower, " Sarah A. Comp, 

William Hassinger, " Phebe H. Kepner, 

Josiah Bower, • " Elizabeth Shoemaker, 

George Comp, " Magdalene E. Sosseman, 

William Hollenbach, " Sarah E. Kleckner, 

Samuel Hollenbach, " Susan Kleckner, 

Jacob Kleckner, " Matilda Shope, 

Miss Catharine Comp, " Jemima C. Dromgold, 

" Mary E. Tressler, " Elizabeth Schoch. 

" Mary J. Dromgold, 

In May, 1857, 3Ir. Solomon Bower of Blain, as delegate, 
attended Synod at Perryville, Juniata County. During this 
summer Rev. Willard faithfully instructed a class of catechumens 



CHAPTER. I. 61 

in tte Catechism, and on the 26th of December, 1857, the follow- 
ing were received at Loysville to full communion by confirmation: 

Jacob Arnold, Mary E. Kepner, 

"W. Cornelius Hutchinson, Mary A. Yohn, 

Catharine Hull, Mary E. Heim, 

Mary A. Hull, Mary J. Wormley, 

Sarah Wolf, Sarah E. Kepner, 

Catharine A. Loyj Levi Adams, ") received by 

Susan M. V. Willard, Mary E. Adams, j certificate. 

During the fall of 1857 and the beginning of '58, Rev. Willard 
and the people of his charge made a noble effort to secure the 
location of the Lutheran Missionary Institute at Loysville, and for 
this purpose from eight to ten thousand dollars were subscribed 
by them ; but for various reasons, not necessary to state here, the 
Institute was located at Selinsgrove, Snyder County, Pa. 

Mr. John Kistler, as delegate, in May, 1858, attended Synod 
at Bloomfield, Perry County. 

On the 14th of November, 1858, the following persons were 
confirmed at Loysville : 

George Baltozer, Absalom Weaver, Catharine Rempfer. 

Having served the charge faithfully for two years and a half, 
Rev. Willard resigned in November, 1858, and accepted a call 
from the Mifilintown pastorate. The whole number of members 
admitted to full communion at Loysville, whilst he was pastor, 
was sixty-nine; he also baptized at this place thirty-seven infants. 
The congregation was, perhaps, never before in a more prosperous 
condition than during his ministry. Here, as in all the congre- 
gations of the charge, he kept up almost continual instruction to 
the young in the Catechism. At Loysville he preached once 
every two weeks, alternately in the German and English languages. 
The following is a synopsis of his labors in the loliole charge, 
during the two years and a half he was pastor of it. He says, "I 
preached 600 times; received by confirmation, baptism, and certi- 
ficate, 313 into full communion in the church ; baptized 40 adults 
6 



OZ CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

and 170 infants; preached 50 funeral sermons; solemnized 31 
weddings ; lectured on the Catechism 600 times, and also fre- 
quently at prayer meetings." 

As the membership had greatly increased, and the charge was 
so large and laborious, and as Rev. Willard's health and strength 
began to fail, he desired the charge to be divided, or an assistant 
to be employed. As no assistant was employed. Rev. Willard 
deemed it his duty to resign, and the charge was divided. The 
Blain and St. Paul's congregations, considering themselves able to 
support a pastor, united in forming the Blain cliarge. By this 
secession the Loysville charge was somewhat weakened, and there- 
fore application was made to the Bloomfield charge for Emanuel 
congregation near Ickesburg. The Bloomfield charge, not wish- 
ing to express any opinion on the subject, allowed said congrega- 
tion, on certain conditions, to unite with the Loysville charge if 
it chose to do so. The congregation did so unite on the 1st of 
June, 1859. 

We may here remark, that many of those persons who were 
added to the churches of the Loysville charge by Rev. Messrs. 
Ruthrauff, Weiser, and Willard, would have been lost to the 
Lutheran Church, had it not been for the timely introduction of 
the vise of the English language in divine worship. A deeper 
tone of piety, also, began to prevail ; prayer meetings were 
established in all the congregations; church government was 
recognized and discipline was enforced; catechization, instead of 
being a formality, was made an instrument of great good to many 
souls ; and the Gospel was preached with power and unction from 
on high, the necessity of repentance, faith, and a change of heart 
wrought by the Holy Gho»t, were clearly set forth and earnestly 
enforced, all of which, with God's blessing, resulted in extensive 
awakenings and revivals of religion. The congregations most 
evidently passed over into a new life, and now occupy a position 
far higher and very much better than they did before ; they dis- 
play more energy, exhibit more piety, and manifest more respect 
for themselves as Lutherans. They have learned to appreciate 
their own Church, her soundness of doctrine, her excellency of 



CHAPTER I. 63 

government, her invaluable system of catechization, and her scrip- 
tural simplicity and correctness in practice. Some there may be, 
who see in every one else, something that pleases them better 
than their own; but this is surely not the case with the intel- 
ligent, the pious, the leading men of the congregations. 

After the resignation of Rev. Willard, the charge was vacant 
about six months, and consisted now of the following congrega- 
tions, viz., Loysville, Mount Zion (formerly St. Peter's), Ludolph's 
(Germany, near Elliottsburg), and Emanuel Church near Ickes- 
burg. 

Rev. G. M. Settlemoyer, 

of Wittenberg College, Ohio, having accepted a call from the 
charge, entered on his pastoral labors in April, 1859. He preached 
regularly once every two weeks to each congregation. Having 
for a length of time instructed a class of catechumens at Loysville, 
on the 10th of March, 1860, he confirmed the following persons : 

Joseph Stuber, John Loy, 

Jacob Culler, Miss Mary E. Loy, 
Samuel Comp, " Caroline Minich, 

Josiah Comp, " Hannah Stuber, 

William W. Witmer, " Sarah E. Low, 

Alexander Chesnut, " Sarah Copenhaver. 

At the same time, or shortly before, the following were received 
by certificate, viz., George Snyder, Henry Kiner, and Miss Sarah 
A. Murphy. 

In May, 1859, as delegate of the charge, Jacob Crist, Esq., 
attended Synod at Mifilinburg, Union County, Pa., and in May, 
1860, Mr. Benj. Rice at Petersburg, Perry County. 

After having instructed another class for more than six months 
in the Catechism, on the 2d of March, 1861, the following persons 
were admitted to full communion by confirmation : 

Benjamin Weaver, Henry Sosseman, 

Henry Weaver, Miss Sophia Rempfer, 



64 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

At the same time, Michael Null and Mrs. Rebecca Weibly 
were received by certificate. 

Having served the charge two years, Rev. Settlemoyer resigned 
it in April, 1861, and immediately after this, the Emanuel Church, 
near Ickesburg, seceded from the Loysville charge, and united 
with the Blain charge. The Loysville charge consists, therefore, 
at this time of only three congregations, viz., Loysville, Mount 
Zion, and Ludolph's. Having been vacant about four months, the 

Rev. Peter Salim, 

of Somerset County, accepted a call, and commenced his pastoral 
labors in the charge on about the 1st of September, 1861, and has 
since labored in it with great acceptance and success. On the 
15th of September, be preached his introductory sermon here, in 
the German language, in the forenoon, from 2 Cor. 5 : 20, and in 
the afternoon of the same day in the English language from 
Heb. 13 : 17. 

In October, 1861, Mrs. Kepner and Miss Priscilla Kepner 
were received by certificate as members of this congregation. 

Having been for several months carefully instructed in the 
fundamental doctrines of our holy religion, and being found pos- 
sessed of the requisite qualifications, on the 15th of March, 1862, 
the following twenty-five persons were admitted to membership 
by the solemn rite of confirmation : 

John H. Arnold, Mary Shoemaker, 

Henry Rice, Sophia Bear, 

Martin Luther Tressler, Rebecca Wagner, 

Henry Sahm, Matilda Ann Minich, 

George W. Heim, Matilda E. Tressler, 

Martin Bernheisel, Mary Ann Sunday, 

Luther Bernheisel, Josephine M. Kepner, 

Jacob Schwab, Mary A. Rice, 

Daniel Zug, Isabella Rice, 

William Rhodes, Leah Schaeffer, 



CHAPTER I. 65 

David Kleckner, Louisa Kiner, 

Emanuel Wagner, Rebecca Grow. 

Leah Ellen Rhodes, 

" Salvation, the joyful sound ! 

"Tis music to our ears ; 
" A sov'reign balm for ev'ry wound, 
A cordial for our fears. 

" Buried in sorrow and in sin, 
At hell's dark door we lay ; 
But we arise by grace divine, 
To see a heav'nly day. 

" Salvation I let the echo fly 
The spacious earth around ; 
While all the armies of the sky 
Consi^ire to raise the sound." 

In May, 1862, Mr. S. Dunkelberger represented the charge in 
Synod at Selinsgrove, Snyder County, Pa. 

SECTION II. 
ST. Peter's, now mount zion Lutheran church, in spring township. 

This church is located about five miles east of Loysville, in 
Spring Township, and the old Union church was commonly known 
as St. Peter's, but the new Lutheran church, about a mile north 
of St. Peter's, received the distinctive name 3Iount Zion. 

The early history of St. Peter's Church is involved in much 
obscurity, as there are no authentic documents at hand from 
which information might be gathered. As early as 1790, and 
probably a few years before that, the congregation at Loysville 
was already organized, and it is very likely that the other congre- 
gations in the Valley were at that time only preaching stations, 
whilst on occasions of communion all the members went to Loys- 
ville. We are led to this conclusion by the fact, that among the 
names of catechumens and communicants of Loysville, in 1798 
and 1804, we discover those of persons from the vicinity of St. 
Peter's and of Blain. No doubt Rev. Kiihl preached here occa- 



66 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

sionally in school -houses, private dwellings, and barns. After 
him. Rev. Messrs. Herbst and Sanno preached frequently in this 
neighborhood, as it lay on their direct way between Carlisle and 
Loysville. In the year 1809, 

Rev. John Frederick Oaterloli 

took charge of the Lutheran congregations in Sherman's Valley, 
and there is no doubt but that when he came into the Valley the 
St. Peter's congregation was first regularly organized, though we 
have nothing to show the particular time. 



THE OLD UXION ST. PETER S CHURCH. 

The following Constitution shows that at the time it was drawn 
up, the Lutheran and German Reformed congregations were 
regularly organized, and that they had hitherto worshipped in a 
school-house, located on the site afterwards occupied by St. Peter's 
Union Church. 

CHURCH-CONSTITUTION. 

Constitution of St. Peter's Chui-ch, drawn up December 23d, 
A.D., 1815, between the Evangelical Lutheran and German Re- 
formed congregations, [then] in Tyrone Township, Cumberland 
County [now in Spring Township, Perry County], Pa. 

Whereas, in our vicinity the Germans are increasing in number, 
both by emigration from other sections of our country and by the 
natural growth of our families, and Wliereas, from these causes 
our congregations and membership are growing in number, and 
we have reason to believe that our increase in future will still be 
greater, and Whereas, the school-house, in which we have hitherto 
been worshipping, has already become too small, — Therefore, we, 
the undersigned, after mature deliberation, have concluded to 
build a new church edifice, for the public worship of Almighty 
God, on the following conditions : 

1, The church edifice shall be erected on land "iven as a dona- 



CHAPTER I. 67 

tion to the joint congregations, viz., the Lutheran and Reformed, 
by John Gamber, on which land the school-house now stands. 

2. It shall be a Union church for the use of the German Re- 
formed and Evangelical Lutheran congregations, and in it these 
congregations shall have equal rights and privileges. 

3. No other religious denomination shall be permitted to wor- 
ship in this church edifice ; nor shall a minister, who is not in 
regular connection with the Synod or Classis of one of the above- 
named congregations, be allowed to preach in this church without 
the consent of the united Councils of said congregations. 

4. The communion and baptismal service, the altar-cloth and 
church-key, shall be the joint property of these two congrega- 
tions at all times and on all occasions, both on Sundays and week- 
days. 

5. This church shall be the undisturbed property of our children 
and children's children ; should circumstances, however, make it 
necessary for the congregations to separate, then one congrega- 
tion may become the sole owner of the church by paying to the 
other, upon amicable agreement, a just equivalent for the right 
which the latter transfers. 

As testimony that these articles have been adopted and sanc- 
tioned as our future bond of union and government, we hereunto 
subscribe our names as the united council and building committee 
of the above-named congregations : 

Lutherans. German Reformed. 

Henry Swarner, ) ^, , Chris. Heckendorn, ■) j^, , 

John Miller, | ^''''''' Conrad Carl, \ ''^'^'''' 

Jona. Dunkelberger, ") ^ Henry Kell, ) r> 

° ' I Deacons. ^ , -^^ , I Deacons. 
, j John Snyder, ) 

John Miller, ") t, vj- n 

' )■ Buddinq tommittee. 
Henry Kell, j ^ 

The corner-stone of this church was laid on the 15th of April, 
1816. The ministers who were present, and took part in the 
exercises of the occasion, were Rev. Messrs. Jonathan and Albert 



68 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

Helffenstein of the Keformed Church, and Rev. Messrs. Osterloh 
and Heim of the Lutheran Church. In the spring of 1817, the 
church was dedicated to the service of God, and was called *S'/. 
Peter^s Cliurch. The ministers present at the dedication were 
Rev. Heim, pastor, and Rev. Benjamin Keller, Lutherans, and 
Rev. Jonathan and Albert Helffenstein, German Reformed. 

It was a log church edifice, about thirty-five by forty feet in size. 
Inside there was a gallery on three sides ; the pulpit was cup- 
shaped and mounted on a high post ; the seats were high and 
unpainted. In many respects the internal arrangement was a 
bad one. The edifice stood till 1857, when it was torn down and 
a brick church edifice was erected in its stead. 

Rev. Osterloh ceased to preach here in the spring of 1816, and 
according to a resolution of Synod, passed in June of the same 
year, 

Rev. John W. Heim 

took charge of the congregation, and served it as pastor about 
thirty-three years and a half, i. e., till he was called from earth to 
heaven in December, 1849. The congregation was then vacant 
about ten months. Who and how many were here admitted to 
full communion, whilst Rev. Heim was pastor, we have no moans 
of knowing, as no church-record has yet been found, and probably 
none was kept. 

Rev. Frederick Ruthranff 

commenced his pastoral labors here, in connection with the Loys- 
ville charge, in October, 1850. He at once introduced the use 
of the English language in divine worship, a measure much 
needed, and for want of which the congregation had been suffer- 
ing for some time. He labored here with great acceptance and 
success. A church-book was now bought, and records were here- 
after made. Soon after he became pastor of the congregation he 
commenced instructing a class of catechumens in the Catechism, 
and on the 24th of May, 1851, the following persons were ad- 
mitted to full communion by the rite of confirmation : 



CHAPTER I. W 

Abraham Bower, • Margaret Dunkelberger, 

Henry Kiner, Priscilla Nunemacher, 

John Minieh, Lydia Nunemacher, 

Elizabeth Low, Jane SchaefFer, 

Mary Ann Dunkelberger, Catharine Weingartner. 

Having preached a year, Rev. Ruthrauff commenced to in- 
struct another class of catechumens, and, on the 5th of June, 
1852, the following persons were confirmed : 

Christian Bohr, Barbara Weingartner, 

Martin Burkhart, Mary Jane Comp, 

Joseph Weingartner, Elizabeth Comp, 

Hannah J. Robison (baptized), Sarah Nunemacher, 

Priscilla Dunkelberger, Mary Magd. Rhodes. 

Rev. Ruthrauff served the congregation about two years, and 
resigned in November, 1852. The congregation was then vacant 
about five months. Having accepted a call from the Loysville 
charge, the 

Hev. Reuben Weiser, 

of Chambersburg, Pa., entered on the discharge of his pastoral 
duties here on the 1st of April, 1853. During the winter of '54, 
he catechized a small class, and on the 30th of April, 1854, the 
following persons were admitted to communion by confirmation : 

John Burkhart, Elizabeth Burkhart, Matilda Fleckenberger. 

Having served the congregation as pastor for about two years 
and a half, Rev. Weiser resigned in September, 1855, and ac- 
cepted the Presidency of Central College of Iowa. The congre- 
gation was then vacant about six months. A call was extended 
by the Loysville charge to the 

Rev. Philip Willard, 

which he accepted, and commenced his labors as pastor on the 
25th of May, 1856. He labored among the people of St Peter's 



70^ CHURCBES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

Church with great diligence and consequent success. At the 
close of the year '56 and the beginning of '57, in connection 
•with catechizing, it pleased the Lord to pour out his Spirit on the 
congregation, and whilst many were revived and refreshed as with 
the dew of heaven, a number were hopefully converted to God, 
and after being more fully instructed, on the 7th of February, 
1857, the following persons were admitted to full communion by 
confirmation : 

John Dunkelberger, Mrs. Mary Gibson, 

David Dunkelberger, Catharine Dunkelberger, 

Elias Dunkelberger, Mary A. Dunkelberger, 

Jacob Nunemacher, Mary McBride, 

Daniel Nunemacher, Sarah E. Bower, 

John McBride, Anna Bella Schaeffer, 

John B. Swarner, Sarah J. Shoemaker, 

"Wm. H. Shoemaker, Margaret Comp, 

William Duncan, Mary Angeline Ziegler, 

Samuel Duncan, Sarah Ellen Rhodes, 

Henry B. Swarner, Mary Jane Stambach, 
Robert C. Gibson (baptized), Elizabeth Bear. 

Under the efficient labors of Rev. Willard, the congregation 
was greatly encouraged and built up, prayer-meetings were esta- 
blished, the Sunday-school increased, and a new life and energy 
were manifested by the membership. The Lutheran congregation 
became fully conscious that they were a Lutheran congregation, 
and of this they gave full proof in the course they pursued in the 
erection of a new house of worship. 

MOUNT ZIOX EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH. 

The Lutheran congregation had for some time felt the want of 
a new and more convenient church. The old Union (St. Peter's) 
Church had not only become too small, but was also badly ar- 
ranged and very uncomfortable in cold weather. The first move 
towards building a new church was made in 1855. It was then 



CHAPTER I. .71 

contemplated to erect another so-called Union church. Subscrip- 
tions for this purpose were secured to the amount of sixteen hun- 
dred dollars, and a contract was made to have the brick furnished 
for this intended new Union {alias, disunion) church ; but, on 
account of sickness on the part of the contractor, the brick were 
not made according to the contract, and thus the putting up of 
the building was providentially deferred. After the enjoyment 
of an extensive revival of religion, and the accession of a number 
of new members on the part of the Lutheran congregation, the 
want of a new and more suitable house of worship was not only 
felt more deeply than ever before, but the necessity and advantage 
of each denomination having its own house of worship, and of 
managing its own aifairs, were also more clearly seen. Hence the 
subject of building a new Lutheran church was discussed, and 
after consultation it was mutually agreed by some of the leading 
men of both denominations to divide the brick, for which they 
had contracted, equally between the two denominations. 

A meeting was then called at the house of Mr. Jeremiah Dun- 
kelberger, on the 7th of January, 1857, when and where "it was 
unanimously resolved to erect a new church edifice for the use of 
the Evangelical Lutheran congregation." A parcel of ground, 
offered by Mr. Jeremiah Dunkelberger, was selected as the site of 
the new church and burial-ground. Messrs. George Schaeffer, 
Jeremiah Dunkelherger, and Joseph Dunkelberger were appointed 
the building committee. Subscriptions were now taken for an 
entirely Lutheran church. As to the old church property, the 
Lutheran congregation retained its right to all the property held 
jointly by the two denominations, except the old Union church 
edifice and a small lot of ground directly fronting said Union 
church, which, for the sake of convenience, they sold to the Ger- 
man Reformed congregation for one hundred dollars. As to the 
old Union graveyard, " it was resolved that the Lutherans reserve 
their right to all the remaining Union property and burial-ground 
for free burial, as heretofore, to any member of the Lutheran 
church who may prefer to bury in said ground to the end of 
time." At the same meeting it was " resolved to build of brick, 



72 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

forty feet wide by fifty-five feet long, with an end gallery; and 
that as the German Reformed retain the name of St. Peter's, the 
new edifice be called Mount Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church." 
Messrs. Benjamin Reiber, Daniel Dunkelberger, and Daniel 
Schaefi"er were appointed a committee to draft a constitution for 
the future government of the congregation. Though Rev. Wil- 
lard was not named as a member of the committee, we have per- 
sonal knowledge that he wrote this Constitution, which is in the 
main very good, and is at every point a fair exhibition of Rev. 
Willard's views on church government and discipline. Let credit 
be given to whom credit is due ! The draft of the Constitution 
was afterwards presented, duly considered and revised, and then 
unanimously adopted as the rule of government for the congrega- 
tion, and reads as follows : 

CONSTITUTION OF MOUNT ZION EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN 
CHURCH. 

As God is a God of order, and as it is indispensably necessary 
to have laws and regulations for the purpose of promoting order 
and harmony in society, enforce Christian discipline, extend the 
Redeemer's kingdom, and honor and glorify God; Therefore, we, 
the subscribers, hitherto members of the Evangelical Lutheran 
congregation at St. Peter's Church, Spring Township, Perry 
County, Pa., having made a profession of our faith according to 
the doctrines, government, and discipline of "the Evangelical 
Lutheran Synod of Central Pennsylvania," and of "the General 
Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in the United States" 
of America, do, this 7th day of February, A.D. 1857, adopt for 
our future government the following Constitution : 

ARTICLE I. 

NAME AND OBJECT OF THIS CHURCH. 

Section 1. This association shall be known by the name of 
Mount Zion Evangelical Lutheran ChurcJi, in Spring Township, 
Perry County, Pa. 



ciiArxER I. 73 

Sec. 2. The object of this association shall be to have the 
Word of God preached and the Sacraments administered in their 
purity, to promote vital piety, peace and concord among the 
members, and to extend the Redeemer's kingdom in general. 



ARTICLE II. 

OP THE CHURCH PEOPERTY. 

Sec. 1. The church edifice, graveyard, and all property belong- 
ing to the congregation, shall be under the exclusive control of 
Mount Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church. 

Sec. 2. The burial-ground shall be free for interment to all 
individuals and families, who annually contribute to the support 
of the pastor and the defrayment of the necessary expenses of 
the congregation. And the old graveyard and the property pur- 
chased and held by the two congi-egations conjointly, excepting 
what has been sold for the accommodation of the brethren of the 
Reformed Church, shall still, to the end of time, be free to any 
member or members of both congregations wishing to bury there. 

Sec. 3. Those who refuse to contribute to the objects specified 
in tlae preceding section, unless they are in indigent circumstances, 
shall pay $ — for a grown person, and for the privilege of burying 
here. 

Sec. 4. Ministers in good standing of other sister orthodox de- 
nominations may have permission to preach an occasional sermon 
in this church edifice when unoccupied by the Lutheran congre- 
gation, and by the concurrence of two-thirds of the existing 
Council. 

article III. 

OP THE PASTOR. 

Sec. 1. No minister shall be permitted to ofiiciate to this con- 
gregation in the capacity of a pastor, who is not a member in good 
standing of some Evangelical Lutheran Synod, and is unwilling 
7 



74 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

to teach the doctrines and conform strictly to the rules of govern- 
ment and discipline prescribed by the General Synod of the Lu- 
theran Church in the United States. 

Sec. 2. No minister, who is not considered orthodox by his 
own denomination, shall be permitted to ofl&ciate or minister in 
this church on any occasion. 

Sec. 3. The pastor shall not administer the sacrament of the 
Lord's Supper to any member or members of the congregation, 
who are known wilfully to live in open violation of the duties re- 
quired of them in the Scriptures. 

Seo. 4. As the Holy Scriptures enjoin upon those who are 
called to preach the Gospel that they shall live of the Gospel, 
therefore no minister shall ofl&ciate as pastor of this congregation, 
who at the same time follows any other secular employment for 
the alone sake of filthy lucre. 

Sec. 5. Should the pastor, officiating to this congregation, in 
any way disgrace his office by an unholy life, he shall be subject 
to the discipline of the Church as laid down in the Formula of 
the General Synod, Chap. 3, Sec. 5. 



ARTICLEIV. * 

OF THE OFFICERS OF THE CHURCH. 

Sec. 1. The officers of this congregation shall consist of two 
Trustees, two Elders, and two Deacons, one-half of whom shall 

be elected annually in turn on the , each of whom shall, after 

the first year, serve two years; and should a vacancy occur by 
death, removal, or any other cause, it shall as soon as convenient 
be filled by an especial election. 

Sec. 2. The duties of these officers shall be to manage the af- 
fairs of the church or congregation. They shall exert themselves 
that the kingdom of Christ, and peace and harmony, be promoted 
in the congregation, and they shall attend to the various duties 
enjoined upon the officers in the above-named Formula, Chap. 3, 
Sec. 6. 



CHAPTER I. 75 

Sec. 3. These officers, in connection with the Pastor, shall 
constitute the Church Council, of which the Pastor shall be ex 
officio chairman. See Formula, Chap. 4, Sec. 3. The duties of the 
Church Council are prescribed in the Formula, Chap. 4. 

Sec. 4. No one shall be elected a member of the Church 
Council who is not a regular communing member, exemplary in 
his conduct as a Christian, and does not attend regularly to the 
ordinances of God's house. 

Sec. 5. Should any member of the Council, whether he be a 
Trustee, Elder, or Deacon, act unworthy of his office or neglect 
his duty in any respect, the remaining members of the Council, 
or of the church, shall admonish him, and if admonition fail, they 
shall then proceed against him according to the rules laid down 
in the Formula of the Church, Chap. 4, Sec. 7. 

Sec. 6. It shall be the duty of the Council to elect a Secretary 
and Treasurer, either from their own number or from the members 
of the church, who shall attend to the duties usually devolving 
on such officers and make a report to the congregation when called 
for by the Council. 

Sec. 7. The Council shall meet at least once every three 
months, or oftener if necessary, to consult on the spiritual inte- 
rests of the congregation. 

Sec. 8. The Council shall examine the names of the commu- 
nicants given in on sacramental occasions, and if they discover 
the name of any member who would be an unworthy communi- 
cant, it shall be their duty to inform such a member privately, and 
to admonish him or her not to come to the table of the Lord until 
he or she has given satisfactory evidence of true repentance. 

Sec. 9. The Trustees shall always be the building committee 
when building is going on, and it shall be their duty to take charge 
of the church property and burial-ground, to keep them in repair, 
to solicit and collect money for the purposes here indicated, and 
to attend to such other duties as naturally devolve upon their office. 



76 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 



OP THE CHURCH MEMBERS. 

Sec. 1, No one shall be received as a regular member of this 
congregation unless by certificate, or as specified in Chap. 4, Sec. 
b, of the Formula. 

Sec. 2. It shall be obligatory on every member to attend faith- 
fully to the duties which the Bible enjoins, viz., to lead a holy 
and blameless life, attend church and the prayer-meeting regu- 
larly, to be often at the holy communion, and, in short, to per- 
form all the duties upon condition of which Christ offers life and 
salvation ; and should any member fail in the discharge of these 
duties, or disgrace his profession by an unholy walk and conver- 
sation, he shall first be privately admonished as the Word of God 
directs. Matt. 18 : ]5-17, 1 Cor. 5 : 1-3 ; and if this prove in- 
effectual, he shall then be cited to appear before the Church 
Council for trial, and be dealt with according to Chap. 4, Sec. 8, 
of^the Formula. 

Sec. 3. Should any member refuse to appear before the Coun- 
cil when properly cited, he shall, after other expedients fail, be 
publicly expelled, his name with the charges shall be read from 
the pulpit, and the whole congregation shall be summoned to kneel 
and pray that God may reclaim him from the error of his ways. 

Sec. 4. It shall be the duty of every communicant to attend 
the preparatory exercises on the day preceding the communion, and 
to give in his or her name ; should, however, unavoidable circum- 
stances prevent such attendance, then he or she shall give the 
reasons for absence on the day following before the hour of com- 
munion. A list of the names of communicants shall be recorded 
in the archives of the church. 

Sec. 5. Should differences arise between members of the 
church, they shall use every means to settle them, and make peace 
among themselves as soon as possible ; but if this cannot be done, 
the matter shall then be brought before the Council for adjust- 
ment at the proper time, and not be deferred to a communion sea- 



CHAPTER I. 77 

son; and when the matter is adjusted by the Council, each 
member shall be under the most solemn obligation to submit to 
their decision, unless the aggrieved party can show scriptural and 
satisfactory proof that their decision was wrong, or he intends to 
appeal from their decision to the Synod or Conference, in which 
latter case he shall give the notice specified and proceed in all 
things according to the Formula, Chap. 4, Sec. 12. 

Sec. 6. It shall be the duty of every member to contribute ac- 
cording to his or her ability to the support of the Gospel ; should 
any one be unable to contribute anything, the name of such an 
individual shall then be recorded, and he or she shall be entitled 
to all the privileges of a regular church member, provided his or 
her walk and conversation in all other respects comport with the 
Christian character. 

ARTICLE VI. 

OP ELECTIONS. 

Sec. 1. All regular elections for officers shall be held by ballot, 
and shall take place on the first Saturday of April, and the no- 
minations shall be made according to Chap. 6 of the Formula. 

Sec. 2. Special elections may be held at the option of those 
who hold them, either by ballot, or by rising, or by taking the 
yeas and nays, as shall be most convenient. 

Sec. 3. The election for a Pastor shall be held according to 
Chap. 6, Sec. 5, of the Formula. 

Sec. 4. In all elections the male- communicants who are in re- 
gular standing, and those females who are heads of families, shall 
have a vote, and they shall have the indiscriminate right of ex- 
pressing an opinion and of voting on all subjects brought before 
them for decision, 

article VII. 

OF MISCELLANEOUS MATTERS. 

Sec. 1. A regular record shall be made by the Secretary of all 
the members received by baptism, infant and adult, by coafirma- 

7'^ 



78 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

tion or certificate, together with a list of the communicants, deaths, 
removals, and marriages, an abstract of which shall be annually 
sent to Synod for inspection. 

Sec. 2. A regular record of the proceedings of the Council 
and congregation, together with the amount of collections and ex- 
penses, shall be kept by the Secretary, and shall be open for the 
inspection of every member. 

Sec. 3. On communion occasions, members of sister denomi- 
nations shall be invited to and made cordially welcome at the table 
of the Lord ; but those not in good standing shall have no privi- 
leges in this church which are denied them in their own church ; 
in other words, this congregation shall not interfere with or render 
void the discipline of sister denominations by granting their mem- 
bers privileges which are denied them by the denomination to 
which they belong. 

Sec. 4. This congregation shall have a Sabbath-school, of which 
the Council shall always be a committee to act in concert with the 
Superintendent and other ofl&cers in promoting its interests and 
extending its usefulness. 

Sec. 5. The prayer-meeting shall be kept up regularly, and be 
conducted according to Chap. 7 of the Formula. 

Sec. 6. This Constitution shall be binding on us and our suc- 
cessors ; it may, however, be altered or amended at any meeting 
regularly called, by a concurrence of two-thirds of the members 
present, provided such alteration or amendment be proposed to 
the members for consideration one month before its adoption. 

Signed by the Pastor and officers in behalf of the congregation 
on the 7th day of February, A.D. 1857. 

Kev. Philip Willard, Pastor. 
Jere. Dunkelberger, | rJl^.^^^^^^^^ Saml. Dunkelberger, j Elders. 
Abraham Bower, J Benjamin Reiber, j 

Daniel Schaeifer, ") r> 

' L Vearons. 
William Duncan, J 

Mr. Stephen Losh contracted for the erecting of the new church, 
and the work was prosecuted without delay. 



CHAPTER I. 79 

The corner-stone was laid on Saturday, the 19th of September, 
1857. The ministers present on this occasion were Rev. P. 
Willard, the Pastor, Rev. P. M. Rightmyer, Rev. D. H. Focht, 
Rev. I. J. Stine, and of the German Reformed Church, Rev. C. 
H. Leinbach. On Friday evening previous, Rev. Stine preached 
in the school-house near St. Peter's Church. As it rained hard 
on Saturday (the 19th), the exercises connected with the laying 
of the corner-stone were held in a barn near the site of the new 
church. At 10 o'clock, a.m., Rev. Focht preached a discourse 
in the German language from Isa. 28 : 16, and Rev. Rightmyer 
followed immediately with a sermon in the English language from 

. Rev. Willard attended then to the usual exercises on such 

occasions, and deposited in the corner-stone the following docu- 
ments : the Holy Bible, the Lutheran Hymn-book and Liturgy, 
a copy of the proceedings of the General Synod and of the Synod 
of Central Pennsylvania, one number of the Evangelical Review, 
one of the Lutheran Observer, one of Der Jugend Freund, one 
of Der Lutli. Kirchenhote, one of the Missionary, Luther's Smaller 
Catechism, a Catalogue of Pennsylvania College, a sketch of the 
history of the congregation and a copy of its Constitution, a list 
of the ministers present, a list of the names of subscribers and 
the amount each subscribed, a copy of each of the county papers, 
the names of the church officers, and of the contractors and 
architects, and some coins and relics ! 

Rev. Willard had for some time instructed a class of catechu- 
mens, and on Saturday the 29th of May, 1858, the day preceding 
the consecration of the new church, the following persons were 
admitted to full communion by the rite of confirmation : 

Jacob Shaeffer, Benjamin Ziegler, Sarah R. Reiber, 

Emanuel Heim, Margaret E. Moore, Elizabeth Sweger. 

George W. Heim, 

The new church was consecrated to the service of God on 
Sunday, the 30th of May, 1858. The Rev. Joshua Evans, of 
Newviile, who assisted Rev. Willard on this occasion, gives the 



80 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

following account of the exercises connected witli the consecration, 
in the Lutheran Observer, July 23, 1858 : 

^' Messrs. Editors : Your excellent paper being the chief 
medium of religious intelligence in our Church, I offer for its 
columns a brief notice of the consecration, on the 30th of May 
last, of a new Lutheran church in the Loysville pastorate, situate 
about five miles east of Loysville, Perry County, Pa. Religious 
exercises were commenced in a school-house near the church, on 
Thursday evening, May 27th, and conducted by the pastor. Rev. 
P. Willard, without assistance, until Saturday the 29th, when the 
church was opened, and a sermon was preached by Rev. Willard 
in the German language. On Saturday afternoon and evening, 
on Sabbath morning and evening, and on Monday morning, the 
writer (Rev. J. Evans) preached in the English language. On 
Sabbath morning after sermon, the pastor performing the liturgical 
service, the church was solemnly consecrated to the service of the 
Triune God. During the exercises on Saturday and Sunday, the 
Loysville choir conducted the singing and added much to the 
enjoyment of the congregation by their sweet and soul-stirring 
music. The congregation worshipping in this church, formerly 
worshipped in a Union church — Lutheran and German Reformed; 
but unwilling to spend more money in Union churches, and feeling 
the importance of having a house of worship of their own, they 
determined to build a Lutheran church, and they have completed 
the work in a manner which speaks well of their wisdom and 
liberality. The edifice stands on an elevated site, forty feet by 
fifty-five in size, built of brick and surmounted with a steeple and 
bell, and presents, externally, a very attractive and imposing ap- 
pearance for a country church. The interior is finished and 
furnished in a manner at once neat and convenient. It has an 
end gallery. A debt of several hundred dollars rested on it when 
it was otherwise ready for consecration ; but after the sermon on 
Sabbath morning an effort was made to free it from pecuniary 
embarrassment, and subscriptions and contributions were so libe- 
ral that no debt worth naming remained. On Monday, the 31st, 
the sacrament of the Lord's Supper was administered to an atten- 



CHAPTER I. 81 

tive and devout congregation. The people of that vicinity are 
now summoned Sabbath after Sabbath to their attractive and 
pleasant place of worship, and their faithful pastor is greatly 
cheered by seeing the work of the Lord prospering in his hands. 
Rev. Willard has been eminently successful during his two years' 
labors in the Loysville charge, having added already between two 
and three hundred members to the church." 

The entire cost of Mount Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church, 
was between twenty-three and tioenty-four hundred dollars. Rev. 
Willard had nine catechumens attending his lectures on the Cate- 
chism during the summer of '58, and it is to be regretted that 
they were not confirmed before he resigned. Finding the labor 
of the large charge he served too great for his strength, he re- 
signed in November, 1858. 

This congregation is under lasting obligation to Rev. Willard 
for the service he rendered it. Not only was a goodly number 
added to the church and many were revived and converted, but 
he saved the congregation from plunging into the whirlpool of 
Union churchism, and secured it a house of its own. After a 
vacancy of about five months, the 

Rev. G. 31. Settlemoyer, 

having accepted a call from the Loysville charge, commenced his 
pastoral labors in April, 1859. Soon after he had taken charge, 
Rev. Settlemoyer commenced instructing a number of persons in 
the Catechism, and on the 7th of April, 1860, the following were 
admitted to full communion by confirmation : 

John Bower, Miss Esther Bower, 

Lewis Sweger, " Mary Cath. Shaeffer. 

At the same time John Bill man was received by certificate. 
In the fall of '60, Absalom Hull and Mrs. Kripper, and after- 
wards two or three others, were received by certificate. 

Having served the congregation two years. Rev. Settlemoyer 
resigned in April, 186L About one-third of the preaching is at 



82 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

present needed in the German language. Soon the congregation 
will require German no more. 

The congregation was vacant about four months. On the 1st 
of September, 1861, the 

Rev. Peter SaJim, 

as Pastor of the Loysville charge, entered on the discharge of his 
ministerial labors in the charge, and, on the 22d of this month, 
he preached his introductory sermon here in German from Heb. 
13 : 17, and two weeks after in English from 2 Cor. 5 : 20. 

In November, 1861, Mi.ss Eliza Dewalt was received as a mem- 
ber of this congregation by certificate. 

Rev. Sahm preaches here once every two weeks, alternately in 
the German and English languages. 

"Oft in danger, oft in woe, 
Onward, Christians, onward go : 
Bear the toil, maintain the strife. 
Strengthened with the bread of lift. 

. " Let not sorrow dim your eye ; 
Soon shall ev'ry tear be dry ; 
Let not fear your course impede : 
Great your strength, if great your need. 

" Onward, then, to glory move ; 
More than conqu'rors ye shall prove ; 
Though oppos'd by many a foe. 
Christian soldiers, onward go !" 

SECTION III. 

LUDOLPH {alias Germany) chuech, ix spring township. 

A number of members in the vicinity of Elliottsburg, then 
Tyrone, now Spring Township, belonged to the church at Loys- 
ville, and some to St. Peter's. To either of these churches the 
distance was considerable. Hence, the members prevailed on the 

Rev. John W. Heim 

to preach for them occasionally at what was known as Carl's 
School-house, about one mile and a half east of Elliottsburg. Rev. 



CHAPTER I. 83 

Helm preached at first on week-days at this place, from 1837 to 
1840. This school-house stood on a tract of seventeen acres of 
land, which Henry Ludolph Spark, some fifty or sixty years ago, 
donated in his last will for school purposes. He was a German 
school-master, a member of the Lutheran Church, and sometimes 
preached and administered baptism in this community at the be- 
ginning of the present century. He had no family. From what 
we can learn he was a good man, and sought to do good. On 
these seventeen acres of land, Mr. Spark had a school-house 
erected, where for many years he taught the children in that 
neighborhood. He also died here, and lies buried in an old grave- 
yard, now overgrown with underbrush and small trees, about fifty 
rods northeast of the church and present graveyard. After Mr. 
Spark's death, a Mr. Carl taught school here for some twenty 
years. Hence, it used to go by the name of "Carl's School- 
house." As the land had been donated for school purposes, after 
the church was ereq^^ed on it, the school directors claimed it; but 
to obviate all difficulties said directors sold, on the 6th of March, 
1852, one acre and one hundred and twenty-six perches strict 
measure, for one dollar, to Jacob Dumm and Abraham Kistler, 
then the trustees of the church. 

Encouraged by the occasional visits of Rev. Heim, the mem- 
bers in all that region were collected and regularly organized into 
a congregation in 1840. But as their number was considerable, 
the school-house was too small to accommodate them. Thus, the 
necessity of erecting a church was seen by all. This church they 
built on the land donated by Henry Ludolph Spark, and they 
therefore called it Ludolph Church. Rev. Heim wrote the follow- 
ing Church Constitution in the German language : 

CONSTITUTION. 
In the name of God the Father, of God the Son, and of God 
the Holy Ghost. Amen. God is a God of order, and nothing 
can be acceptable to Him, or redound to His glory, unless it be 
done in the spirit of order, of love and peace. Therefore, We, 
the Church Council and Church JMembers, do solemnly obligate 



84 CHURCHES BETAVEEN THE iMOUNTATNS. 

ourselves, on this the 20th day of May, 1841, to observe most 
foithfully and conscientiously the following Constitution : 

CHAPTER I. 

OF THE CHURCH, LAND, GRAVEYARD, AND SCHOOL-HOUSE, 

Our church, bearing the name Ludolph Church, to be built on 
the land which Henry Ludolph Spark donated in his last will for 
the use of a school-house and a school-teacher, consisting of seven- 
teen acres, situate in Tyrone [now Spring] Township, Perry 
County, State of Pennsylvania, shall for all time to come be a 
Union church, and so it shall be used by both religious denomi- 
nations, namely, the Evangelical Lutheran and Evangelical Re- 
formed, until, by the mutual agreement of both denominations, the 
one denomination shall buy the right of the other. And it shall 
not be allowed at any time, that any other doctrine than our 
Evangelical Lutheran and Evangelical Refermed, according to 
the Bible and the Augsburg Confession, be set forth or preached 
in this church. Of these two religious denominations, the one 
shall not interfere in the divine worship of the other; but the one 
shall have divine service on one Sunday, and the other on the 
Sunday next following, except when there is a funeral on Sunday, 
and then that denomination which has the funeral shall have the 
use of the church. [The remaining part of this Constitution is 
word for word the same as that of the Loysville Church, see pp. 
37-41, and need therefore not be repeated here.] 

To the above Constitution, "We, the Church Council and Church 
Members, herewith subscribe our names : 

Lvtheran Church Council. Gerniaii Reformed Church Council. 

David Stambaugh, ) „ , Peter Shearer, ) _ , 

' Elders. -n , • i t^ r Elders. 



George Beistlein, j" ' Fi'cderick Dumra, 

John Shearer, Jr., ) Simon Shull, } 

T^ . , Ti.. r Deacons, t u t-i V Deacons. 

Daniel Rupsomen, j Jacob Dumm, ) 

John Shearer, Sen., Trustee. William Sheively, Trustee 

Michael Foose, Treasurer. 

Daniel Preisler, Secretary. 



CHAPTER I. 85 

The above Constitution has long since become obsolete, and 
each congregation manages its own affairs according to its own 
General Synod's Church Constitution. 

The foundation work of the church was commenced on the 
26th of April, 1841, and on Thursday, the 20th of May following, 
the corner-stone was laid. On this occasion divine services were 
held in ''Carl's School-house," when and where Eev. Heim 
preached an appropriate sermon in the Glerman language. If any 
other ministers were present at the laying of the corner-stone, we 
have failed to ascertain the fact. The Trustees were the build- 
ing committee. On account of sundry difficulties, the church 
went up slowly, and was not ready for consecration till November, 
1842. Rev. Messrs. Heim and Leinbach ofl&ciated on this occa- 
sion. Mr. George Wolf did the carpenter work of the church. 
The edifice is of rough stone walls, about thirtij-fivc hy forfy feet 
in size. Inside it has but one floor, no end gallery, and the pews 
are not painted — all is plain and unadorned ; but it is a Union 
church, or, more correctly, a disunion church. Sometimes it is 
called Germany Church, because at the time it was erected the 
German language was almost the exclusive language spoken in 
that vicinity, and then, as now, a large number of Germans from 
the Valerian d settled and still settle in that section of Spring 
Township. The use of the English language begins, however, to 
prevail. 

In the spring of 1844, among others, the following persons were 
admitted to full communion by confirmation, after they had been 
faithfully instructed by Father Heim in the Catechism : 

Daniel Shoemaker, Miss Mary Shearer, 

Daniel Shull, " Rebecca Shearer, 

Martin Stambaugh, " Susan Shearer, 

Jered Nunemacher, " Mary Shoemaker, 

William Nunemacher, " Susan Rice, 

John Bernheisel, " Mary A. Nunemacher, 

W^illiam Foose, *' Susan Bernheisel, 

Michael Foose, " Catharine Bernheisel, 



86 



CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 



John Beistlein, 

William Shearer, 

John Souder, 

George Burkepile, 

Mrs. Dale, 

Miss Mary Comp, 
" Catharine Beistlein, 
" Eliza Beistlein, 



Miss Eliza Bernheisel, 

'' Susan Foose, 

" Mary Stambaugh, 

" Catharine Stambaugh, 

" Ann Burkepile, 

" Rachel Burkepile, 

" Mary Shall, 

" Julian Stambaugh. 



Some time in the year 1848, Rev. Heim confirmed at this place 
another class of catechumens, but for want of a record we cannot 
give their names. He preached exclusively in the German lan- 
guage. On the 27th of December, 1849, the Lord called him 
from his labors on earth to rest in heaven. The congregation 
was then vacant about ten months. Having accepted a call from 
the Loysville charge in October, 1850, the 

Rev. Frederick RutTirauff 

commenced his pastoral labors here. Here, as well as in all the 
other congregations of the charge, he at once introduced the use 
of the English language in the preaching of the Gospel. At 
the communion held on the 10th of May, 1851, the number of 
communicants \^\i& forty-eight. Having ibr some time faithfully 
instructed a class of catechumens, on the 15th of May, 1852, the 
following persons were received by confirmation : 



Philip Burkert, 
Miss Mary A. Grove, 
" Susan Beistlein, 
" Mary Ann Spohn, 
" Isabella Shoemaker, 
" Sarah Shoemaker, 



Miss Elizabeth Foose, 
" Mary Ann Kistler, 
" Catharine Frey, 
" Susanna Loy, 
" Elizabeth Smith, 
" Julian Minich. 



Having served the congregation as pastor a little over two 
years, Rev. RuthrauflF resigned in November, 1852. The con- 
gregation was then without a pastor for about five months. 
Having accepted a call from the Loysville charge, the 



CHAPTER I. 87 



Rev. Reuben Weis 



commenced his labors here as pastor on the 1st of April, 1853, 
and served the congregation about two years and a half. He re- 
signed in September, 1855. We cannot learn from the church 
record, or from any other source, that any were added to the con- 
gregation whilst Rev. Weiser was pastor of it. The congregation 
was again vacant about seven months. Then a call was extended 
to the 

Rev. Philip Willard 

by the Loysville charge. He accepted that call, and entered on 
the discharge of his pastoral duties on the 25th of May, 1856. 
This indefatigable and zealous minister of the Gospel labored in 
season and out of season, and the Lord crowned his labors with 
great success and gave him many souls as a reward for his dili- 
gence. In February, 1857, during a protracted meeting, the 
Lord poured out His Holy Spirit on the congregation, when many 
Christians were revived and many sinners hopefully converted to 
God. The subjects of this revival were then formed into a class 
and thoroughly instructed in the Catechism of the Church, and 
on the 18th of April, 1857, the following persons were received 
to full communion by the rite of confirmation : 

David Grove, Miss Catharine Rice, 

Josiah C. Foose, '' Mary Jane Loy, 

Samuel Hassinger, " Susan Rempfer, 

Samuel Fleisher, " Catharine Spohn, 

James G. Messimer, " Margaret Spohn, 

Hugh Moffitt, " Eliza Spohn, 

Abraham Kistler, " Catharine Fleisher, 

Jacob Kistler, " Rebecca E. Shoemaker, 

David Wentzel, " Sarah Beistlein, 

Abraham Reem, " Lucinda Wentzel, 
Miss Anna Rice, 

At the same time the above were confirmed, three persons, 
whose names were not recorded, were received by certificate. In 



88 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

the fall of 1857, Rev. Willard met another class of catechumens, 
and another precious revival was enjoyed, during which a large 
number yielded their hearts to God. These were still further in- 
structed for some time, and on the 20th of February, 1858, the 
following persons were admitted to full communion by confirma- 
tion : 

John M. Smith, Levi F. Gehr, 

James A. Gray, Mrs. Mary Ann Smith, 

John S. Kistler, Miss Jane F. Kacy, 

John Loy, " Sarah J. Kacy, 

Henry Spohn, " Mary Jane Gray, 

William Perry, " Catharine Loy, 

Jacob Shoemaker, '' Catharine Stambaugh, 

George W. Gehr, " Sarah Foulk. 

Having served the charge and this congregation with such 
marked success for two years and a half, to the great regret of 
all, Rev. Willard resigned in November, 1858. The charge was 
then vacant about five months. In April, 1859, the Loysville 
charge extended a call to the 

Rev. G. M. Settlemoyer, 
who, having accepted that call, commenced his ministerial labors 
here. On the 21st of April, 1860, George Sliuler was admitted 
to membership by baptism, and Mrs. Maria Boyd and Miss Cless 
were received by certificate. 

Having been carefully instructed for some time, on the 23d of 
March, 1861, the following persons w6re received as communing 
members by the rite of confirmation : 

John Reapsoma, Miss Anna E. Shoemaker, 

Sinary Wentzel, " Mary E. Clouser, 

Miss Caroline Wentzel, " Elizabeth C. Clouser. 

After Rev. Settlemoyer had served the congregation two years, 
he resigned in April, 1861, and on the 1st of September follow- 
ing, the 

Rev. Peter Sahm 

accepted a call from the Loysville charge, and preached his in- 



CHAPTER I. 



89 



tvoductory sermon here on the 22 d of September in German 
from Heb. 13 : 17, and in two weeks afterwards in the English 
language from 2 Cor. 5 : 20. 

After the pastor had instructed them in the Catechism of the 
Church, and being found qualified, on the 8th of March, 1862, 
the following fifteen persons were confirmed : 

George Fleisher, Samuel Ream, Matilda Reapsoma, 

Reuben Shuler, Elizabeth Fleisher, Elizabeth Shuler, 
Joseph Shuler, Elizabeth Rice, Ann Beistlein, 

Michael Loy, Mary Ream, Mary Wentzel, 

John Shuler, Elizabeth Ream, Catharine Kistler. 

This congregation still requires that about one-half of the 
preaching be in the German language. In a letter, Rev. Sahm 
remarks: "In the fall of '61, before I held my communion meet- 
ings, I visited the members of my charge, and found that two 
hundred and four belonged to the congregation at Loysville, 
ninety to Mount Zion, and seventy-eight to Ludolph's. Since then 
forty-three have been added to this number in the charge, making 
at this time (June, 1862) in all four hundred and fifteen mem- 
bers. Between fifty and sixty persons profess to have been con- 
verted since I have taken charge of this pastorate, and they were 
of diflFerent ages from fifteen to sixty." 

In May, 1862, Mr. Sam. Dunkelberger, as delegate of the 
charge, attended Synod at Selinsgrove, Pa. 

At different times since its organization the following persons 
have served as officers of the Lutheran congregation worshipping 
at Ludolph's Church : 

Elders. 



David Stambaugh, 
George Beistlein, 
John Loy, 
Daniel Wetzel, 
Henry Fleisher, 
Benjamin Rice, 
John Beistlein, 
Dr. Lewis Ellerraan 



from 1841 to 1853. 

" 1841 to 1856. 

" 1853 to 1860. 

" 1856 to 1860. 

" 1856 to 1860. 

" 1860 yet in office. 

" 1860 " 

" 1860 " 



90 



CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 



Deacons 



John Shearer, Jr., . 
Daniel Riipsomen, . 
John Burrel, . 
William Hassinger, 
Martin Stambaugh, 
John Rice, 
John Cless, 
James G. Messimer, 

John Shearer, Sen., 
Abraham Kistler, . 



Trustees. 



cm 1841 to 1853. 
1841 to 1854. 

1853 to 1856. 

1854 to 1860. 
1858 to 1860. 
1856 yet in office. 
1860 " 
1860 " 



from 1841 to 1851. 
" 1851 to 1858. 



CHAPTER II. 91 



CHAPTER 11. 

BLOOM FIELD CHARGE. 

The Bloomfield charge formed originally a part of the Loysville 
pastorate. In 1844, when the English Lutheran congregation 
was organized at Bloomfield, it may be said the charge was first 
formed, though for some years after that Rev. Heim continued to 
preach for the G-erman portion of the congregation at Bloomfield, 
and for some years various changes were made in the charge, as 
will appear more fully as we proceed in our narrative. 



SECTION I. 

Christ's church at bloomfield.* 

After the Indian wars had closed and the Revolution had suc- 
cessfully ended, the settlers in this valley located permanently, 
and, from all we can learn, the Lutheran portion of the popula- 
tion was the first to enjoy the stated preaching of the Gospel. 
Of the original founders of the Lutheran congregation at Bloom- 
field,f we can give the names of only a few. The Comp family 

* This is a discourse delivered by the writer, on the 4th of October, 1857, 
based on Ps. 143 : 5, "I remember the days of old." On that day, and for the 
last time, divine worship was celebrated in Christ's old Union Log Church. 
The discourse was prepared specially for the occasion, and hence the direct- 
ness of address and appeal. As a memento of the solemn occasion of leaving 
that old church edifice, by request, the discourse is given entire and un- 
changed. 

t Perry County was organized in 1820, and until 1825 the County Courts 
were held at Landisburg. In 1825 the site now occupied by Bloomfield was 
a clover-field, and selected as the location of the county town. 



92 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

and Shover settled in this vicinity in about 1780; the Cless family 
in 1785; the Clark, Fritz, and Meyer families in about 1790; 
the Westfall family in 1791, and the Slouch in 1795; the Smith, 
Crist, and Sweger families in 1800, and the Roth family in 1803. 
Besides these, a number of others had settled in this part of the 
valley at the close of the last century, but the exact time of their 
arrival we cannot learn. These families were scattered over an 
extended territory, and at that time the population was com- 
paratively sparse. When visited by a minister of their Church, 
they came together the distance of six, eight, and even twelve 
miles, through dark, pathless forests, over hills and streams, to 
hear the glad tidings of peace and salvation by faith through 
Jesus Christ. Private dwellings, barns, school-houses, and the 
shaded woods served them as places for divine worship. It is 
highly probable that they were occasionally visited, from 1780 to 
1788, by the Rev. John G. Butler of Carlisle. Immediately after 
this, the 

Rev. John T. Kiild 

commenced visiting and preaching for the Lutherans in Sherman's 
Valley, and in 1790 located near Loysville. From 1788 to 1795 he 
preached also for the scattered members of the Church in the 
vicinity of Bloomfield. Of bis success here, and of the condition 
of the congregation at that time, we have no authentic informa- 
tion. Some time in 1795 or '96, Rev. Kiihl left Sherman's Valley; 
but where he located after he resigned here, we have no means of 
knowing. Soon after this, the members in Sherman's Valley 
secured the spiritual labors of the 

Rev. John Ilerhst, 

who located at Carlisle, Pa., in 1796, and took charge of the Lutheran 
congregation at Loysville, and preached also occasionally for the 
members here. We have been informed that he administered the 
sacraments among the members of the congregation, and it is 
probable that the congregation was regularly organized by him 
some time between 1797 and 1800. As the members were favored 



CHAPTER ir. 93 

with occasional preaching, they naturally felt the want of a suit- 
able house of worship, and such a house they now resolved to 
build. 

THE OLD UNION LOG CHURCH. 

This church was built jointly by the Lutherans and German 
Keformed on one acre and a half of land, which they bought of 
Jf^cob Lupfer for ticelve dollars. This land was located by Mr. 
Lupfer in 1787 by order from the Land Office, surveyed for church 
purposes in 1802, and conveyed by deed to the two denomina- 
tions on the 14th of May, 1804, and is now embraced in the 
borough of Bloomfield. Those of the members who were able to 
do so, furnished, each, one round or more of logs. These logs 
were fine white pine, oak, and some poplar. After all the required 
timber had been brought together, the church edifice was raised 
on Saturday, the 19th of June, 1798. The building was thirty- 
six feet long by thirty feet wide. In erecting the edifice, heavy 
cross-beams were inserted for a gallery, which was however not 
constructed till about twenty-two years after. Soon after the 
building had been raised, Mr. Andrew Shuman covered it with a 
substantial roof; but, as we are informed, nothing more was done 
towards its completion till 1802. Thus for four years the edifice 
stood without doors, windows or floor. There was then no stove 
in the church (as it was called), and preaching only in summer. 
The congregation sat on slabs laid on blocks sawed from logs, and 
the minister, when preaching, stood behind a little, rough, wooden 
table. The earth served as floor, and the roof as the only cover- 
ing over head, whilst the naked walls, without doors and windows, 
surrounded the attentive congregation. In winter, the minister 
preached in private dwellings in the vicinity. At that time, 
during the cold seasons of the year, there was preaching here but 
seldom. The pastor resided at Carlisle, about eighteen miles ofi^, 
and the roads in the depth of winter must have been almost im- 
passable across the North Mountain and through the dreary forests 
of Sherman's Valley. 

In 1801, Rev. Herbst resigned at Carlisle, and consequently 



94 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

ceased to visit the members here. In 1802, a floor was laid in 
the church, doors were put up, and windows round below ; the 
spaces for windows round above were closed with boards; the 
seats remained as before, except that they were now raised on the 
floor, and the minister, as before, stood behind a small table when 
he preached. It is probable that about this time, or within a few 
years after, a stove was secured for the church. 

As the draft of the church-land, made in 1802, clearly shows, 
the ground on which the church was located and the lands all 
around it were at that time well timbered with large forest trees. 
About one acre and a half, lying northwest of the church, had 
been cleared a long time before, but was now densly covered with 
young pine bushes and sumac, and part of it was afterwards in- 
cluded in the graveyard. A large pine tree stood in front of the 
church, facing what is now High Street. Near where the brick 
school-house now stands was a pond of water, in which at that 
time an abundance of frogs sported, and all the low ground from 
the pond downHo Big Spring was overgrown with underbrush and 
greenbrier. The church was located on an eligible site. The 
place is considerably elevated on a dry gravel bank, which slopes 
away towards the north and rising sun ; northwest of it Limestone 
Ridge rises gradually in bold relief, and, on the southeast, it 
overlooks Bloomfield and a small but beautiful valley, when, at a 
distance of about one mile and a half, the view is bounded by the 
gracefully rising Mahauoy Ridge. A short distance west of the 
church the road forked, — one road passed in front of the church 
and led to Carlisle; the other passed back of the church, over 
ground now embraced in the graveyard, and led to Juniata River 
at Newport. At the time when the church was erected, all the 
lands around it, and nearly all that are now embraced in the 
borough of Bloomfield, were covered by a dense forest of large 
timber and underwood. There was then not a house nearer than 
the old building on Mr. David Lupfer's farm and the dwelling of 
the late Mr. Barnett, each of them nearly a mile off. The church 
stood lonely in the woods to tell that God was worshipped there. 

The graveyard was commenced soon after the erection of the 



CHAPTER IT. 95 

church. Peter Moses was the first person buried here, and a Mr. 
Cless the second. The graveyard, back of the church, leans 
against Limestone Ridge, and from a gradual ascent looks down 
towards the southeast. The dead were buried here many years 
before their graves were inclosed by a fence. The graveyard is 
now quite large, and the many white marble slabs, dotting it all 
over, tell the sad story of man's mortality. 

Of those who helped to build this house of worship, not one is 
left to tell us its early history in detail. They have all passed 
away with the rush of time, and many of them now repose here 
in " God's acre." And soon, too, this building, which our fore- 
fathers erected, in which they worshipped the Godof their fethers in 
prayer and sweet hymns of praise, will be levelled with the ground, 
and all the hallowed recollections associated with it will perish from 
the memory of man. When the dark and unbroken forest shaded 
all around, our gray fathers met on this sacred spot, marked out 
a space in the fork of the road, and with holy reverence con- 
cluded to build a temple to the honor and glory of God. They 
did build such a temple. And here they listened with sweet 
delight to the story of the Cross, sang Zion's hymns, and their 
orisons paid. And here, hard by the temple of their God and of 
our God, many of them laid their bodies down in peace to rest till 
the resurrection day. No bell tolled their funeral dirge, and 
many have no stone set up to mark their resting-place. A forest 
of tall trees in the winds sighed plaintively over their graves and 
mantled the upturned earth with yellow leaves. How solemn the 
retrospect ! How all has changed ! and after us changes will still 
go on. It is well for us to "remember the days of old," and 
learn to live for another and better world. 

" may our feet pursue the way 
Our pious fathers led ; 
While love and holy zeal obey 
The counsels of the dead." 

After Rev. Herbst ceased to preach in Sherman's Valley, the 
congregation at Bloomfield did not, for some time, enjoy reeularly 



96 CHURCHES BETWRKN THE MOUNTAINS. 

the blessing- of the preached word. We are informed, however, 
that the 

Rev. Frederick Saruio,' 

whQ preached regularly at Loysvillc, preached also occasionally to 
the members here, and administered the sacraments among them. 
We have also been told by an aged member of the Lutheran 
Church, that the 

Rev. Uenrij LuJvJph Spark, 

who taught school in Spring Township and donated the land on 
which Ludolph Church is erected, lectured or preached, from 
1802 to 1806, for the members in this vicinity and baptized their 
children, though it does not appear that he officiated in the church. 
Mr. Spark was not a regular minister; but as the members had 
no regularly ordained pastor, he, as a pious school-master, some- 
times preached and performed ministerial functions. Such was 
the state of things at that time. From 1806 to 1808, the 

JRcv. Frederick Oherhauserj^ 

who preached in Saville Township, in the neighborhood of Ickes- 
burg, and also of Blain, occasionally visited the members here 
and preached for them in their houses. The congregation did 

* Mr. Oberhauser was from Ilolland, and is said to have been a man of 
considerable erudition. For a number of years he preached at different places 
in Saville and Toboyne Townships, and, in 1815, he confirmed a class of cate- 
chumens in the house now occupied by Mr. Andrew Shuman, near St. An- 
drew's or Shuman's Church. lie also practised medicine. In Ilolland he 
may have been a regular minister, and for some time he preached in North- 
ampton County, Pa. : but when he preached in Sherman's Valley, he did not 
stand in connection with any Synod. We have met with the following notice 
of his death : " Died, on Thursday last (the 12th of April, 1821), in Toboyne 
Township, Perry County, in the 75th year of his age, Dr. Frederick Ober- 
hauser. His remains were attended to the grave (at Blain?) by a large con- 
course of people."— r^e Perry Forester. After his death his large librar}' 
was sold. Nearly all the books were in the Dutch language. Father Ileim 
bought a large number of them, and some forty volumes of them are now in 
the writer's library. 



CHAPTER II. 97 

not enjoy the regulai' services of a recognized pastor till 1809, 
when the 

Reo. John Frederick Osterloh 

took charge of nearly all the Lutheran congregations in Sherman's 
Valley. He preached here once eyery four weeks in the German 
language. It is said, that whilst he was pastor here, and for 
some time after, the congregation had in one corner of the church 
a barrel full of oats, and a trough fixed in the fork of a tree near 
the church, where the horse fed whilst the parson preached. At 
that time the people consulted convenience rather than taste, and 
adapted themselves to the circumstances by which they were 
surrounded. At present some people think it too hard to go a 
few miles to hear the Gospel preached. Then it was not so. 
Then people went over hills and passed streams, not on smooth 
and level roads, but by by-paths and without paths, not on horse- 
back and in carriages but on foot, from six to ten miles, without 
uttering a word of complaint. Then, as we are told, in summer 
they generally cariied their shoes till within sight of the church, 
when they put theui on instead of taking them o£F, as Moses was 
commanded to do, because the ground was holy. And then, 
during the warm season of the year, the men went to church 
without coat, having on a home-spun white linen shirt and jacket 
thrown over it, and the women had on a sun-bonnet as a covering 
for their heads, and garments spun, wove, and made by their own 
hands. Thus, in their dress they were plain, in their intercourse 
with each other unaffected, and in their worship without hypo- 
crisy, simple and devout. 

The congregation was organized by Rev. Osterloh on a better 
and firmer basis than that on which it stood before. Mr. George 
Cless was elected to the office of Elder, and Mr. Matliiax Mei/er 
to that of Deacon. These fathers remained in office for many 
years. The congregation, now enjoying the stated'ministry of a 
pastor, gathered strength and advanced prosperously. The scat- 
tered members were drawn together from great distances, and 
were elad to hear the word of God and engage in the solemn ex- 



yo CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

crciscs of the sanctuary. The youth, who had grown up without 
church connection, were brought under the benign influence of 
the Gospel, and instructed by the pastor in the doctrines of our 
holy religion. Accessions were made to the membership of the 
congregation, and the hearts of those who mourned over the deso- 
lations of Zion and longed foi; the bread and water of life, were 
made to rejoice in God their Savior. 

As no church-record was kept by this congregation till 1855, 
we are wholly dependent on the memory of our informants for 
the names of persons who were confirmed here from time to time; 
nor is the time of confirmation and the number confirmed always 
certain. Under these circumstances, we are unable to give the 
names of more than about two-thirds of those who were admitted 
to full membership here. 

As the church edifice was unfit for occupancy in winter, Rev. 
Osterloh met and catechized the youth in private dwellings. In 
the spring of 1810, the following persons — the first, so far as we 
can learn, that were ever confirmed here — were admitted to full 
communion : 

Jacob Clouser, Miss Mary Yeager, 

Conrad Roth, '' Susan Roth, 

Henry Roth, " Sophia Shover, 

Henry Lenig, " Susan Richter, 

John Cless, '' Catharine Westfall, 

John Meyer, " Margaret Westfall, 

George Sunday, " Magdalene Smith, 

George Yeager, '' Elizabeth Roth. 

Andrew Shover, '' Elizabeth Slouch, 

Martin Smith, " Sarah Cless, 

Miss Catharine Smith, " Elizabeth Cless, 

" Mary Ann Crist, " Catharine Cless. 

With but two or three exceptions, all the above persons have 
already gone to the eternal world. They have run their race, and 
now reap the fruitof their deeds while on earth. In 1811, another 



CUAPTER II. 99 

class of catechumens was confirniecl. Of this class the followinp^ 
are the only names we could learn : 

Matthias Grove (baptized), Miss Mary Miller, 

Benjamin Smith, " Catharine Burd. 

Miss Elizabeth Meyer, 

We have not been able to find that any others were confirmed 
until 1814, when the following persons, and a number of others 
whose names are not recollected, were admitted to full communion : 

Jacob Burd, Miss Catharine Meyer, 

Jacob Lenig, '' Susan Meyer, 

Mrs. Catharine Meyer, " Maria Smith, 

" Doren, " Elizabeth Smith. 

This was the last class of catechumens Rev. Osterloh confirmed 
here. As he neglected the congregation somewhat, the members 
became dissatisfied with him, and petitioned Synod to permit 
them, in connection with other congregations, to give Bev. Heim 
a call. Synod granted "this petition. Bev. Osterloh resigned, 
and in June, 181G, according to a resolution of Synod, the 

Rev. John William Heim 

became the regular pastor of this congregation, which, in connec- 
tion with the other Lutheran congregations in Sherman's Valley, 
he served till his death on the 27th of December, 1849. He was 
a faithful, laborious, and successful minister of the Gospel of 
Christ. Here he preached once every four weeks, exclusively in 
the German language. The heading of a subscription in our 
hands, for the year 1818, shows that the members were willing to 
support him. It reads thus: "May 3d, 1818. We subscribe 
our names towards having Mr. Heim preach in the church in 
Juniata Township, Cumberland County, at Christ's Church. He 
is to preach every four weeks." Forty-two dollars and ninety-four 
cents were subscribed. As the congregation was yet compara- 
tively small, and the members generally poor and scattered over a 
large extent of territory, we are agreeably surprised that they eon- 



100 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

tributed so liberally towards the support of the Gospel. Having 
instructed a class of catechumens faithfully, some time in 1818, 
Rev. Heim confirmed the following persons, with some others, 
whose names cannot now be recollected : 

Daniel Swartz, Miss Rebecca Meyer, 

Jacob Swartz, " Margaret Meyer, 

John Smith, " Eve Lesch, 

Daniel Class, " Catharine Clark, 

John Lenig, " Martha Smith, 

Philip Gensler, " Catharine Smith, 

Adam Cless, " Eve Smith, 

Mrs. Julia Shatto, " Catharine Smith, 

" Susan Eoose, " Catharine Lenig, 

" Esther Doren (baptized), " Catharine Miller. 
Miss Sophia Meyer, 

The members of the congregation were much encouraged by 
the pastoral labors of Rev. Heim, and great success crowned his 
unwearied eiforts to save immortal souls. 

Perry County, which had been a part of Cumberland, was 
organized by an act of Legislature, passed May 22d, 1820. The 
courts were held at Landisburg till 1825. Bloomfield, so called 
from the name given to the tract in the patent, is of recent origin, 
its site having been a clover-field no longer ago than 1825. In 
that year it was selected as the site for the county town. 

After the church had stood about twenty-two years, it was com- 
pleted on the 19th of June, 1820. Seats were now constructed, 
and a pulpit, wine-glass shaped, and supported by a high post, 
was built against the northwest wall ; a round, isolated altar was 
placed in front of the pulpit; windows were inserted round above; 
the roof inside received an arched board ceiling; the gallery, on 
three sides of the house, was erected and ceiled with boards below, 
and was supported by thick posts under strong cross-beams. All 
the wood-work was painted white, and the other part of the inside 
of the church received a coat of plaster. 31r. Michael Clouser 
superintended the carpenter work. After the church had in this 



CHAPTER ir. 



101 



way been completed, it was consecrated some time in July, 1820, 
and received the distinctive name, Christ's Church. The minis- 
ters present at the consecration, were Rev. J. W. Heim of the 
Lutheran Church, Rev. Jacob Shull of the German Reformed 
Church, and Rev. Joseph Brady of the Presbyterian Church. 
Several sermons were preached in the German language, and 
Rev. Brady preached a sermon in the English language. The 
concourse of people, assembled on this joyful occasion, is said to 
have been very great. 

As Rev. Heim resided near Mifflintown, Juniata County, about 
thirty miles off, till the spring of 1828, he catechized here once 
every three or four years. We have not been able to learn that 
any were confirmed at Bloomfield between 1818 and '25, though 
it is probable that one class at least was during that time admitted 
to full communion. During the summer of 1825, Rev. Heim 
met and instructed a class here, and in the fall of the sfime year 
between thirty-five and forti/ were confirmed, of whom the follow- 
ing persons were the most : 



Michael Clark, 

Samuel Comp, 

John Anders, 

George Anders, 

John Shuman, 

William Delancy, 

Henry L. Smith, 

Henry Swartz, 

Jacob Clouser, 

Jacob Roth, 

Daniel Pickard, 

Jonas Lesch, 

Samuel Beistlein, 

Mrs. Hannah Heckendorn, 
" Elizabeth Shuman, 
" Elizabeth Lyons, 

Miss Elizabeth Miller, 



Miss Elizabeth Crist, 

" Catharine Swartz, 

" Margaret Smith, 

" Sarah Smith, 

" Lydia Smith, 

" Elizabeth Shuman, 

" Mary Ann Lenig, 

" Barbara Clark, 

" Catharine Lyons, 

" Elizabeth Attig, 

" Mary Fusselman, 

" Rebecca Eisenhauer, 

" Catharine Beistlein, 

" Rebecca Bausum, 

" Rebecca Otto, 

" Elizabeth Leppert, 

" Hannah Gressley. 



102 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

Some of the above persons are at present among our most useful 
aged members of the church; but many of them have passed 
away into the eternal world. Kev. Heim labored in season and 
out of season, and, having so many and remote congregations to 
serve, he could not catechize at each preaching-place as often as 
we now do. But when he did lecture on the Catechism, the 
young people came the distance of six to ten miles. It was then 
deemed not only a duty, but a most delightful and glorious privi- 
lege, to attend a course of lectures on the fundamental doctrines 
of our holy religion. So religious instruction ought to be yet re- 
garded, and so it is yet regarded by all who have correct views of 
the design and advantage of such a course of lectures. Early and 
thorough instruction, imparted in the spirit of the Master, in the 
truths of our religion, cannot be over estimated. Ignorance in 
regard to the doctrines of Christianity is not only the mother of 
vice, but also very often of infidelity ; and the neglect of indoc- 
trinating the youthful mind invariably results in a sickly, fitful, 
and erratic sort of religion, if religion it may be called. Re- 
ligion is a subject for both head and heart. We must think 
aright before we will feel aright; we must know aright before we 
can act aright; we must have our heads set aright by the word 
of truth before our hearts can be set aright by the spirit of truth. 
Catechization, like preaching, may be abused by men without 
grace; but catechization, like preaching, under God's blessing, is 
the means of good to souls — good that could not be accomplished 
by any other means ; and generally, if attended to in the right 
way, such seasons of instruction result in the awakening and con- 
version of souls — in a revival of genuine religion. 

In the spring of 1828, Rev. Heim moved to Loysville, and after 
that usually catechized here once every three years. Having in- 
structed a class, in June, 1830, he confirmed the following 
persons, and a number of others whose names cannot now be re- 
membered : 

John Miller, Miss Margaret Burrel, 

John Ludman, " Elizabeth Powell, 



CHAPTER II. 



103 



Henry D. Smith, 

John K. Smith, 

William Smith, 

Andrew Comp, 

Jacob Shearer, 

Mrs. Margaret Smith, 

Miss Elizabeth Smith, 
" Catharine Smith, 
" Catharine Frey, 



Miss Lydia Powel, 

" Martha Powel, 

'' Elizabeth Smith, 

" Catharine Smith, 

" Sarah Meyer, 

" Catharine ReisdorflF, 

" Sweger, 

" Swesrer. 



May those of this class, still in the church militant, be pr 
to join the church triumphant ! 



" Faith sees the bright, eternal doors 
Unfold to make his children way ; 
They shall be cloth'd with endless life, 
And shine in everlasting day." 

In May, 183.3, with a number of others, whose names cannot 
be ascertained, the following persons were confirmed here : 



Henry Fleisher, 
Jacob Smith, 
Jonas J. Smith, 
John Shearer, 
George Shearer, 
David Miller, 
Benjamin Reiber, 
Jacob Burrel, 
Daniel Comp, 
John Rhodes (baptized). 



Mrs. Susan Rhodes, 
" Hannah Smith, 
" Hannah Hassinger, 
" Catharine Lenig, 
" Catharine Miller, 
" Mary Smith, 

Miss Magdalene Comp, 
" Mary Clark, - 
" Frances Shearer. 



The congregation was evidently in a prosperous condition at 
this time. Many confirmed in this class are still members of the 
Church here and elsewhere, adorning their Christian profession 
by a godly life and extensive usefulness in the Church. Well 
might Father Heim rejoice in the hope of seeing his instruction, 
his prayers, and his tears yield an abundant harvest. May the 



104 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS, 

truths he taught them be in their hearts as good seed, bearing 
fruit unto eternal life ! 

" Let those that sow in sadness wait 
Till the fair harvest come ; 
They shall confess their sheaves a great, 
And bring rich blessings home."' 

In August, 1835, the following persons, and some others, were 
confirmed : . 

Daniel Reider, Miss Ann Smeigh, 

John Tressler, " Sarah Comp, 

Henry Keider, " Sarah Sweger, 

Jacob Crist, " Catharine Brown, 

Jacob Fleisher, " Catharine Troup, 

Jacob Smith, " Catharine Tressler, 

Samuel Smith, " Lydia Smith, 

John Brown, " Catharine Smith, 

Benjamin Smeigh, '' Barbara Lenig, 

Jacob Smeigh, " Mary Jumper, 

Mrs. Mary Sweger, " Mary Troup, 

" Elizabeth Smith, " Mary Halbaeh, 

Miss Catharine Reider, " Elizabeth ReisdorfF. 

Of those who were this time admitted to full communion in the 
Church, many still remain among us, bearing witness to the ex- 
cellency of the Grospel of Christ by their consistent walk and con- 
versation ; some few of them to the hurt of their souls have gone 
out from among us, and some have gone to try an unseen world. 
May all now living, prepare to meet their Grod ! 

" Draw us, Savior, with thy grace, 
And lift our thoughts on high, 
That we may end this mortal race. 
And see salvation nigh." 

In May, 1839, a large class of catechumens was confirmed. 
The following persons were some of this class : 



CHAPrER II, 



105 



Jacob Super, 
Henry Titzel, 
John Titzel, 
Samuel Tressler, 
Thomas Lenig, 
Beneval Shade, 
John Brown, 
John Burrel, 
William Hassinger, 
John Earhart, 
George Eckert, 
John Lenig, 
Jacob Long, 
John Leppert, 
Daniel Smith, 
John Super, 
Mrs. Elizabeth Lone 



Miss Mary Lenig, 

" Rebecca Tressler, 

" Barbara Lenig, 

" Elizabeth Smith, 

" Elizabeth Smith, 

" Catharine Shearer, 

" Mary Shearer, 

" Elizabeth Comp, 

" Frances Comp, 

" Mary Earhart, 

" Nancy Leppert, 

" Barbara Super, 

" Mary Doren, 

" Catharine Doren, 

" Barbara Lesch, 

" Catharine Frey, 

" Mary Frey. 



Many of these are now among the most active members of our 
Church. Some of them are no more among the living. May 
those who survive, strive to obtain the crown of life ! Soon will 
all our labors end, and 

" With joy shall we stand, when escaped to the shore ; 
^ With harps in our hands, we'll praise Him the more ; 

We'll range the sweet plains on the bank of the river, 
And sing of salvation for ever and ever." 



In May, 1841, a large number of persons were confirmed, of 
whom the following were some : 



Andrew Titzel, 
Solomon Tressler, 
David Shearer, 
John Swartz, 
George W. Swartz, 
Henry Burkepile, 
Samuel Carl, 



Miss Susan Tressler, 

" Sarah Carl, 

" Sarah Shearer, 

" Elizabeth Titzel, 

" Elizabeth Frey, 

" Ann Wax, 

" Mary Smith, 



106 



CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 



David Long, 
Samuel Smith, 
Jeremiah Burkepile, 

Smith, 

Mrs, Hannah Burkepile, 
Miss Elizabeth Tressler, 



Miss Mary Reisdorrff, 
" Barbara Lenig, 
" Susan Bender, 
'< Elizabeth Foulk, 
" Eve Foulk. 



Most of those confirmed this time are still among us, and ac- 
tively engaged in the glorious cause they then espoused. The 
race of life is before them, may they run it with patience, and 
press forward to the heavenly Jerusalem ! 

" Lord of hosts, thou God of grace, 
How blest, divinely blest, is he 
Who trusts Thy love, and seeks Thy face, 
And fixes all his hopes on Thee I" 

On the 23d of September, 184:2, the West Pennsylvania Synod 
of the Lutheran Church convened in this house, and remained in 
session a number of days. 

Though Father Heira had now attained that age when most 
men seek rest in retirement, he nevertheless prosecuted his call- 
ing, and was actively and zealously engaged in the cause of his 
divine Master. In September, 1845, he here confirmed the fol- 
lowing class of catechumens : 



John Sweger, 
Peter Stone, 
George Stone, 
John Stone, 
Samuel Stone, 
John Cless, 
Frederick Cless, 
Peter Hair, 
Jacob Jumper, 
Frederick Jumper, 
Miss Elizabeth Sweger, 
" Mary Ann Sweger, 



Miss Ann Eliza Clark, 

" Margaret Clark, 

" Sophia Comp, 

" Nancy Baker, 

" Ann Foulk, 

" Barbara Foulk, 

" Christiana Doren, 

" Jane Hair, 

" Mary Ann Hair, 

" Sarah Cornman, 

" Margaret Kleckner, 

" Sarah Ann Kleckner, 



CHAPTER II. 107 

This was the last class of catechumens Father Helm confirmed 
here. Before the time had come to meet another class, the Lord 
said to him, '< Well done, thou good and faithful servant, enter 
thou into the joy of thy Lord." Thus he fell asleep in the Lord, 
on the 27th of December, 1849. 

" And now has come his rest, 

His triumph day. Illustrious like a sun, 

In that assembly, he, shining from far. 

Most excellent in glory, stands assured, 

Waiting the promised crown, the promised throne. 

The welcome and approval of his Lord, 

. . . and round him gathered, clad 

In white, the vouchers of his ministry — 

The flock his care had nourished, fed, and saved." 

POLLOK. 

Father Heim continued to preach here to the end of his life, 
having served the congregation about thirfy-tliree years and a 
half. He preached exclusively in the Grerman language, and was 
the honored instrument of adding many to the Church, and of di- 
recting them to Christ. Under his pastoral care the congregation 
was firmly established and built up. His charge was an extended 
and laborious one ; but being possessed of a remarkably strong 
physical constitution, he bore up amid all his labors, and prose- 
cuted his calling with energy and untiring zeal to the end. la 
dangers often, he was undaunted ; in labors constant, he finished 
his work in a good old age, departed in peace, and now reaps an 
ample reward in a world of surprising glory. Many of those he 
confirmed are gems in the crown of his rejoicing ; many of them 
are here to-day, who will soon follow him and their brethren. 
But as we do not intend to preach Father Helm's funeral sermon, 
we will follow the thread of our narrative. 

THE ENGLISH LUTHERAN CONGREGATION AT BLOOMFIELD. 

"We must now go back about six years. During the sessions 
of the West Pennsylvania Synod, held at Bloomfield in Sep- 
tember, 1842, some of the ministers present preached in the 
English language. Soon after that, some of the members, who 



108 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

understood that language best and saw the necessity of introduc- 
ing its use in the pulpit, desired Father Heim to associate with 
himself some minister who could preach in English. But, unable 
to preach in the English language himself, Father Heim was also 
averse to having any one associated with him for the purpose of 
preaching in that language. It is to be regretted that Father 
Heim, like many others at that time, set his face against the in- 
troduction of the English language, when its use in preaching 
was so much required ; he conceived it to be an unwarranted in- 
novation, and opposed it. Such a course was, and could not but 
be, detrimental to the interests of the congregation. Father 
Heim meant it well, however injudicious his policy was on this 
subject. As he was unyielding, the President of Synod interfered, 
and in an indirect way accomplished the desired end. In a letter 
to the writer, the 

Rev. Levi T. Williams, 

who was then stationed at Petersburg, this county, gives the 
following account of the rise, organization, and progress of the 
English Lutheran congregation : 

"According to the directions of Rev. A. H. Lochraan, D.D., 
then President of the West Pennsylvania Synod, I preached a 
trial sermon at Bloomfield some time in January, 1844. I was 
also to preach in the German language ; but as I found the Ger- 
man speaking members considerably opposed to that, I deemed it 
best to get Rev. Jacob Shull, a German Reformed minister, to 
fill that appointment for me. In order to reconcile the German 
speaking members to English preaching, and to prevent a division 
of the congregation, no further appointment was made until every 
means had been used to induce the opposing party to countenance 
the enterprise. When every efibrt had been made in vain, it was 
finally resolved to organize an English Lutheran congregation, 
wholly separate from the German. This was effected on Friday, 
June 14th, 1844, when the following brethren were elected as 
ofiice'rs, viz. : 

Jacob Crist, Sen., ) H. C. Hickok, Esq., . 

David Deardorff, j ' George Attig, 



CHAPTER II. 109 

" A call was then extended to me. This call I accepted. My 
introductory sermon I preached on Sunday, the 14th of July, the 
vsarae year, in the brick school-house near the old Union church. 
Soon after this our Presbyterian brethren relieved us of the 
necessity of worshipping in a filthy school-house, by kindly tender- 
ing us the use of their church, which I then occupied till I re- 
signed. I have no account of the number of members who joined 
in the organization, but there could not have been more than eight 
or ten. I preached for them every third Sabbath. The first 
communion was held on Sunday, Dec. 8th, 1844. On Saturday 
previous (the 7tlf), the following persons were confirmed, viz. : 

Ales. C. Klink, Mrs. Eliza Eby, 

Mrs. Rebecca Attig, " Mary Ickes, 

" Frances Shaeffer, Miss Charlotte Attig. 

" The second communion was held on the 25th of May, 1845. 
On Saturday previous (the 24th), the following persons were ad- 
mitted to full communion by the rite of confirmation : 

Richard Fritz, Miss Harriet Crist, 

John Waggoner, " Rebecca Bender, 

Joseph Bender, " Mary Cormichal, 

Mrs. Eliz. Waggoner, " Margaret Smith, baptized, and 

" Elizabeth Holmes, " Cath. Cormichal, by certificate. 

" I preached my farewell sermon on the 7th of September, 
1845." 

So far the statement of Rev. Williams. 

Rev. Williams resided at Petersburg, and preached there, at 
Bloomfield, Newport, Mount Pisgah, and some other places. 
After he had resigned here, he accepted a call from Franklin 
County, and was succeeded by 

Rev. Lloyd Knight, 

late of the Theological Seminary at Gettysburg, Pa. Whilst pastor 
of the charge Rev. Knight resided at Bloomfield. In a letter he 
gives the following account of his labors here : 
10 



110 CnURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

" I took charge of tlie English Lutheran congregation at Bloom- 
field on the 1st of October, 1845. In the winter following, we 
were blessed with an outpouring of God's Spirit. Many old mem- 
bers renewed their covenant a^d some new ones were added to 
the Church.* Our first communion was held on the 1st of 
February, 1846. Thirty-six members reported themselves as 
communicants on Saturday previous, and as some of the fruits of 
the revival, the following persons were admitted to full com- 
munion by contirraation : 

Dr. Jonas Ickes, Mrs. Cath. Ann Gallatin, 

William Erb, Miss Margaret Holman, 
Thompson Graham, *' Eliz. Arford, 

George Hcnzel, " Mary Shade, 

Samuel Ilassinger, " Sophia Bidelman. 

George W. Brown, 

"At this time the whole number of communicant members was 
forty-seven. Soon after this I commenced instructing another 
class of catechumens, and on the 7th of June, 1840, the follow- 
ing persons were admitted to full communion by confirmation, 
viz. : 

John Roth, Miss Nancy Bear, 

Mrs. Elizabeth Hall, " Isabella Everhart, 

" Elizabeth Bidelman, " Sarah Lamar, by certi- 

'< Susan Boden, \ ficate." 

* In the Lutheran Observer, February 20, 1846, we find the following 
notice of this work of grace : — " Eevival. — An extensive work of grace has 
been in progress at Bloomfield, Perry County, Pa., in the congregation under 
the care of Brother Knight. Our correspondent remarks : ' We have had a 
glorious state of things in our midst. God be praised I For the last six weeks 
much interest has been felt on the subject of religion. About six weeks ago, 
assisted by Rev. Babb and a student from Gettysburg, we commenced a pro- 
tracted meeting, and it was not long until the Lord commenced a precious 
work in our midst, the result of which, I trust, will never be forgotten by 
many souls. Some of the most wicked and abandoned are now clothed and 
in their right mind. Last Sabbath we communed, when there was an acces- 
sion to our little congregation of eleven or twelve new members. To God 
belongs all the praise.' " 



CHAPTER ir. Ill 

The following is a document well worthy our attention now, as 
it is illustrative of the spirit of the charge then : 

*' At the annual meeting of the vestries under the charge of 
Rev. L. Knight, held at Bloomfield, Perry County, Pa., on the 
29th of August, 1846, the following resolutions, among others, 
were unanimously adopted, and ordered to be transmitted to the 
Lutheran Observer for publication, viz. : 

" Resolved, That we have abundant reason to thank Almighty 
God for the prosperous condition of our congregations, and for 
the spirit of unanimity which prevails in our Councils. 

'' Resolved, That the labors, zeal, and piety of our beloved 
pastor meet our entire approbation, and that the means employed 
for the advancement of Christ's kingdom give general satisfaction. 

" Resolved, That Sabbath-schools are of primary importance as 
channels through which the waters of life may freely flow into 
the hearts of the rising generation, and as efficient instrumental- 
ities by which the children of the Church, and at large, may be- 
come thoroughly imbued with the principles and spirit of genuine 
Christianity, have their minds and hearts fortified against evil 
influences, and especially against the wily assaults of the infidel 
and Jesuit; and we believe it to be the imperative duty of the 
members of each congregation, to encourage and aid the establish- 
ment and support of these schools with their influence, their 
personal exertions, and the pecuniary means with which God has 
blessed them. 

" Resolved, That we recognize the solemn truth that 

' Prayer was appointed to convey 
The blessings God designs to give;' 

and we believe the social prayer-meeting to be eminently calcu- 
lated to secure the influences of divine grace, — to call down the 
blessings of Heaven, — to impress and awaken sinners, — to build 
up Christ's followers, — to strengthen the hands of the pastor, — to 
further the best interests of the Church militant, — and to pro- 
mote the honor and glory of God, and should therefore be regularly 
maintained, in a flourishing condition, in every congregation. 



112 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

^^ Resolved, That the preaching of the Gospel is the most 
prominent agency established by the Lord Jesus Christ for the 
building up of his kingdom, and churches should therefore be 
established, pastors appointed over them, and the public worship 
of Almighty God be faithfully maintained ', and while we expect 
the faithful performance of his whole duty on the part of the 
pastor, we on our part know that the 'laborer is worthy of his 
hire,' and regard it as an indispensable requisite to the welfare of 
the Church, that he be provided with a liberal salary , punctually 
paid at stated periods. 

^^ Resolved, That it is the duty of every denomination to sup- 
port its religious newspaper, and we therefore respectfully urge it 
on our brethren to subscribe for the Lutheran Observer them- 
selves, and to induce others to do the same. 

"Philip Ebert, 

" Chairman. 

" Henry C. Hickok, 

"Secretary."* 

In September, 1846, H. C Hickok, Esq., attended Synod at 
Chambersburg, Pa., as the lay representative of the Bloomfield 
charge. 

On the iSth of April, 1847, Mrs. Sarah Power was received as 
a member by certificate, and on the 4th of December, the same 
year, the following wera.admitted to full communion by confirma- 
tion : 

John H. Shade, Miss Mary Boyles, 

Mrs. Sarah Shoemaker, " Isabella Ickes, 

" Eliza Lupfer, " Sarah A. Huss, 

Miss Ann Boyles, " Rebecca W. Huss. 

In September, 1847, Mr. Christian Long of Newport, as dele- 
gate of the charge, attended Synod at Mifflinburg, Union County, 
Pa. 

* See Lutheran Observer, September 11, 1846. 



CHAPTER II. 113 

Oa the 12th of November, 1848, after having been duly in- 
structed, the following persons were confirmed : 

David Tressler, Mrs. Charity Marshall (baptized), 

Conrad Weary, " Margaret Sweger, 

Andrew Hansel, Miss Sarah A. Roth, 

Mrs. Tamer Miller, " Mary A. Cless. 

In September, 1848, Mr. A. Billow, as lay representative of 
the charge, attended Synod at Berlin, Adams County, Pa. 

In the fall of 1848, the English Lutheran congregation was, 
on certain conditions, permitted to worship in the old Union 
church. Hitherto it had the use of the Presbyterian church. 

On the 27th of May, 1849, Mrs. Susan Smeigh was admitted to 
full communion by the rite of confirmation. 

Rev. Knight gives the following summary of his labors at 
Bloomfield : " I received tliirty-four persons into the church, 
baptized thirty-five infants, and attended y?/i'ee?i funerals. Having 
served the charge three years and a half, I resigned in June, 1849. 
I labored under great disadvantages. At Bloomfield we had no 
house of worship of our own, and had to contend with the preju- 
dices against English preaching, &c. At that time the whole 
charge was composed of Bloomfield, Newport, Petersburg, Bufi"alo 
on the Susquehanna, St. David's or Billow's, Mount Pisgah, and 
on the 12th of June, 1847, the seventh congregation was added 
to the charge, namely, the Buifalo or Stone church above Ickes- 
burg, making an area of twenty-seven miles. During the three 
years and a half I was pastor of the charge, there were added to 
the various congregations, 158 members by confirmation and about 
25 by certificate. Had three revivals of religion, — one at Bloom- 
field, one at Newport, and one at Mount Pisgah. I attended 49 
funerals, and celebrated 49 marriages. I left the charge in a 
flourishing and prosperous condition, and much against the will 
of the people. I found the charge in October, 1845, with 166 
communicants, and left it with 396, — an increase of 230 members. 
I shall ever recur to the time I spent among that dear people as 
a green spot on life's dreary way through this world of difficulties 
10* 



114 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

and sorrows. It was my first charge, the charge of my youth and 
of my love; and though the ties which united us together as 
pastor and people have long since been broken and buried in the 
past, they are nevertheless engraven on the heart, never to be 
forgotten. And when our labor is done on earth and our heavenly 
Master finds us worthy of admission into his rest above, may we 
not hope to meet there the dear people to whom we ministered 
here, and whom we, under God, brought into the Church of Jesus 
Christ. God grant it ! Amen." To this we also add our sincere 
— Amen. 

When Rev. Knight resigned, the English Lutheran congrega- 
tion at Bloomfield numbered about seventy members, as many 
already as the German, if not more, and all these were brought 
into the Church in about four years. How strikingly this shows 
that there was great necessity of preaching in this place in the 
English language ! Rev. Knight accepted a call from the Lutheran 
congregation at Hollidaysburg, Pa., and the 

Rev. Jacob Martin 

of Hollidaysburg, Pa., succeeded him at Bloomfield in July of 
the same year. In a letter, Rev. Martin says : 

"I commenced my pastoral labors in the Bloomfield charge on 
the first Sabbath in July, 1849. The charge was then composed 
of Bloomfield, Petersburg, Billow's or St. David's, Mt. Pisgah, 
Newport, Buffalo near Ickesburg, and New Buffalo on the Sus- 
quehanna. After the death of Father Heini, a convention of the 
Church-Councils of the Lutheran congregations in Perry County 
was held at Bloomfield in Feb., 1850, and the congregations 
which Rev. Heim had served, together with those under my pas- 
toral care, were so divided and arranged as to form three pastor- 
ates, namely, the Loysville, the Bloomfield, and the Petersburg. 
My charge (the Bloomfield) was then composed of five congrega- 
tions, namely, Bloomfield, Newport, Shuman's or St. Andrew's, 
St. John's near Markelville, and Buff'alo west of Ickesburg.* 

* For the division of the charges, see pp. 52-54. 



CHAPTER II. . 115 

Whilst pastor of the charge I confirmed between 125 and 150 
persons. I cannot give the names of those who were confirmed 
by me, nor the time when they were confirmed. About one- 
fourth of the preaching was required in the German language." 

In September, 1850, Mr. Christian Long of Newport, as dele- 
gate of the charge, attended Synod at Berlin, Union County, Pa. 
In the fall of 1848, the English Lutheran congregation at 
Bloomfield was, on certain conditions, allowed to worship in the 
old Union church. At the close of 1849, Father Heira departed 
this life, and thus the German part of the congregation was left 
without a pastor. As Rev. Martin could preach so well in both 
languages, he was able to give full satisfaction to both congrega- 
tions and to meet all their wants. The Convention referred to 
above, so divided the congregations as to throw the Germans at 
Bloomfield into Rev. Martin's charge. And in this way he he- 
came the regular successor of Rev. Heim, and thus the German 
and English congregations were united into one congregation. 
This was the best and only way the matter could be arranged. 
Some of the Germans, it seems, were however for some time dis- 
satisfied, being influenced by persons not of our Church and not 
friendly disposed towards her. The matter was brought before 
Synod in September, 1850, when and where the following action 
was taken on the subject : 

"The committee appointed to draft resolutions in reference to 
the division of the Bloomfield and Loysville charges, respectfully 
report : 

" Resolved, That whilst we approve of the steps taken and the 
action had by the Convention regularly assembled for the division 
of said charges, we regret the spirit manifested by the delegates 
of the German congregation at Bloomfield, led astray and beguiled 
hy unbecoming foreign influence. 

^'■Resolved, That we recommend to said German congregation 
entire acquiescence in the arrangements made in the formation of 
said charges." 

A copy of the foregoing action of Synod was sent to the parties 
concerned, and all acquiesced in the decision pronounced. After 



116 . CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

that the united congregation went forward in harmony and peace. 
Rev. Martin preached once every three weeks, alternately in the 
German and English languages. 

Having been faithfully instructed, on the 17th of November, 
1850, the following persons were confirmed : 

Mrs. Bai-bara Burkepile, Miss 'Mary Eliz. Fritz, 
" Catharine Eckert, '' Sarah Wax, 

" Mary Bumbaugh, " Mary Ann Clouser. 

Miss Mary Jane Comp, ^ 

On the 22d of June, 1851, the following persons were admitted 
to full communion by confirmation : 

David L. Beaver, Miss Caroline Both, 

Miss Margaret Jane Martin, , " Maria S. Ickes. 

" Margaret Roth, 

* 

In September, 1851, Mr. David Tressler, Sen , as delegate of the 
charge, attended Synod at Newville, Cumberland County, Pa. 

Having served the charge about two years and nine months, 
Rev. Martin resigned, and at Bloomfield preached his farewell 
sermon on the 28th of March, 1852. H& accepted a call from 
the Berrysburg charge, Dauphin County, Pa., and in June of the 
same year, he was succeeded by the 

Rev. William Gerhardt, 

who, in a letter, gives the following brief account of his labors 
here : 

'' Being called from Elizabethtown, I entered on my duties as 
pastor of the Bloomfield charge on the 13th of June, 1852, when 
I preached my introductory sermon at Bloomfield from Heb. 
13 : 17. I served five congregations, viz., Bloomfield, Newport, 
Bealor's, Shuman's, and Buffalo above Ickesburg. During the 
year, I preached 144 sermons, besides funeral sermons, lectures, 
&c. I instructed and confirmed the ^oWoviin^ forty-seven persons 
[the names of these persons are given at the proper place]. I 
labored in the charge until the 20th of June, 1853, when I ae- 



CHAPTER II. 117 

cepted a call to Mount Bethel, Northampton County, Pa. At 
Bloomfield I preached my farewell sermon on the 12th of June. 

" I labored hard, and have reason to believe that God blessed 
my labors. I saw the necessity of a more churchly spirit among 
our people, and therefore introduced the liturgy, and endeavored 
by combining the form and the life, to accomplish this end. I 
would not have left the Bloomfield charge, but it was too laborious 
for me. My health failed and I was obliged, though reluctantly, 
to leave Perry County for an easier charge. The people were 
very kind to me. Simple and unaffected in their manners, kind 
and generous in their disposition, I always felt myself at home in 
their families, and their hearts were always accessible to the pastor 
to extend advice and instruction. I always look back with plea- 
sure to my one year's stay in Perry County, as in many respects 
the most agreeable since I have been in the ministry. God bless 
the dear people ! I preached my farewell sermon from 2 Cor. 
13 : 14, which sermon, from the nature of the circumstances at 
Shuman's Church on the 19th of June, had the peculiarity of 
being a sacramental sermon, a funeral sermon, and a farewell 
sermon at one and the same time." 

In September, 1852, as delegate of the charge, Mr. Christian 
Long of Newport attended Synod at Mechanicsburg, Cumberland 
County, Pa. 

At a meeting of the different church-councils of the charge, 
in February, 1853, among others, the following resolutions were 



"Resolved, That each congregation furnish a Becord-book, a 
large Bible, and a Hymn-book and Liturgy for its pulpit. 

'* Resolved, That as infant baptism in the church-edifices has 
heretofore been neglected, and in order to resuscitate the practice, 
the officers and members of our congregations be required to aid 
the minister in reviving it." 

On the 19th of March, 1853, after being instructed in the 
Catechism of the Church, the following persons were confirmed : 
Andrew Cless, Miss Mary .Ann Lenig, 

George Cless, " Maria ClesSj 



118 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

Daniel Cless, Miss Margaret A. Cless, 

William Cless, " Mary J. Smeigh, 

Carson Hair, " Ellen E. Smeigh, 

William Hair, " Mary A. Swartz, 

Conrad Jumper, " Eliz. Ellen Miller, 

Samuel Foulk, " Catharine Bumbaugh. 
Miss Eliz. Jane Leuig, 

llev. Gerhardt preached to each congregation once every three 
weeks. At Bloorafield only about one-third of the preaching was 
required in the German language. Thus in divine worship the 
German gave way to the English language. After Rev. Ger- 
hardt's resignation, the charge was vacant about seven months. 

Rev. Adam Hehjiit 

of Mechanicsburg, Cumberland County, Pa., having accepted a 
call, commenced his pastoral labors in the charge on the 1st of 
March, 1854. He resided at Bloomfield. The charge embraced 
the same congregations as before, except that Bev. Height preached 
also occasionally at Millerstown. At Bloomfield only an occasional 
sermon in the German language was now required. In Septem- 
ber, 1854, as delegate of the charge, Mr. Henry Harman attended 
Synod at Shrewsbury, York County, Pa. ; and at this time, for 
reasons not necessary to state, Rev. Mr. Height ceased to exercise 
the functions of the ministry here, after having served the charge 
only about seven months.* 

On the 5th of June, 1854, the charge bought at Bloomfield of 
Mr. Conrad Roth, a house, lot, &c., now the Lutheran Parsonage, 
for eleven hundred dollars. 

Rev. David H. Focht 

of Chambersburg, Pa., having received and accepted a call from 
the charge, entered on his ministerial labors on the 1st of June, 
1855. On Sunday, May 27th, previous to the commencement of 

* See the Minutes of the West Pennsylvania Synod, of September, 1854, 
p. 42. 



CHAPTER II. 119 

his pastoral year, he preached his introductory sermon at Bloom- 
field, from Col. 1 : 28, to a large and attentive congregation. 
This congregation requires preaching in the German language no 
more. What a change hath time wrought I only eleven years ago 
all the preaching in this church was in that language. In this 
Church your pastor has hitherto preached once every three weeks ; 
in the new church he will be able to preach oftener. In 1855, 
the charge consisted of Bloomfield, Newport, St. John's at Mark- 
elville, Shuman's or St. Andrew's, and Buffalo or Emanuel's 
church above Ickesburg; and in June, 1856, when the congre- 
gation at Mansville was organized, it was also added to the charge. 
Thus the charge consists now (Oct., 1857), of six congregations, 
and is much too large to enable a man to do justice to himself and 
his people. 

As delegate of the chargd, Mr. Henry Titzel attended Synod 
in -September, 1855, at Shippensburg, Pa. 

Soon after the present pastor had taken charge of the pastorate, 
he commenced at Bloomfield to instruct a class of catechumens in 
the doctrines of our holy religion. A meeting was held, com- 
mencing on the 6th of November, 1855, and closing on the 20th. 
During this time the pastor preached every evening, catechized, 
and sometimes had anxious meeting each day. God blessed his 
word to the good of the people, and we trust there are many here 
who can in truth say that they found Jesus precious to their 
hearts. This was a glorious season of grace from the presence of 
the Lord. Having been prayerfully instructed, and giving evi- 
dence of a sincere desire to glorify God, on the 10th of Novem- 
ber, 1855, the following persons were confirmed : 

Henry Bice, Mrs. Mary Shade (baptized), 

David I. Rice, Miss Eliz. Cornman (baptized), 
John Rice, " Mary Cornman, " 

Jacob Fritz, " Catharine Comp, 

John Beaver, " Margaret Comp, 

Samuel M Ickes, " Catharine E. Rice, 

John Sweger, " Margaret Rice, 



120 



CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 



George W. Stoufer, 
Jolin Stoufer, 
Josiah Lenig, 
Jacob Hair, 
Mrs. Sarah Rice, 
" Susan Jumper, 



Miss Margaret \V. Rice, 
'' Sarah Fritz, 
" Ellen Simonton, 
" Susan Hair, 
" Elizabeth Ketner. 



May those who were confirmed at this time prove faithful to 
their covenant vows to the end, and then be received to the 
bright mansions above ! This is the sincere prayer of their pas- 
tor. O that God may help each one to run the Christian race 
with patience, ever trusting in Jesus as a present Savior, and 
finally through grace receive the crown of glory ! God bless you, 
my dear catechumens ! 

" How blest the sacred tie that binds, 
In union sweet, according minds, 
How swift the heav'niy course they run, 
Whose hearts, whose faith, whose hopes are one." 

On the 1st of December, 1855, the subscription for the erec- 
tion of a new church was started. Of this we will soon give a 
full account. 

A number of others were found willing to attend catechetical 
lectures, who were faithfully instructed for some time. A meet- 
ing was held from the 11th to the 16th of March, 1856. Rev. J. 
Evans assisted the pastor on this occasion. Souls were converted 
to God and the hearts of Christians were made glad in God their 
Savior. On the 15th of March, 1856, the following persons were 
confirmed : 



John Jumper, 
John Frantz, 
William Bumbaugh, 
Samuel Messimer (baptized), 
Mrs. Elizabeth Clouser, 

" Christiana Rice, 
Miss M. E. Everhart (baptized), 



Miss F. Eliz. Landis (baptized), 
" Catharine Clouser '' 
" Elizabeth Clouser " 
" Sarah Jane Tressler, 
" Hannah Jane Beaver, 
" Sarah Ellen Beaver, 
Catharine Huss. 



CHAPTER II. 121 

May you, my dear friends, never forget the hymn you united 
in singing around the throne of grace when about sealing your 
covenant with God : 

" I love thy Zion, Lord ! 

The house of thine ahode ; 
The church, blest Redeemer, sav'd 
With thine own precious blood," &c. 

On the 29th of June, 1856, Mr. Israel Messimer and his wife 
Catharine were received as members by certificate. 

In September, 1856, Mr. John Wilson of Newport, as delegate 
of the charge, attended Synod at Chambersburg, Pa., when by a 
resolution of the West Pennsylvania Synod, the Bloomfield charge 
became connected with the Synod of Central Pennsylvania. 

Having attended a series of lectures on the Catechism, the 
following persons were confirmed on the 11th of October, 1856: 

Philip Both, Miss Catharine ShaflFer, 

Henry Shaffer, '' Lydia Ann Sweger. 

'■' Awake, my soul, stretch ev'ry nerve, 
And press with vigor on ; 
A heav'nly race demands thy zeal. 
And an immortal crown." 

In January, 1857, a meeting of ten days' continuance was held. 
Rev. C. Kuhl preached five sermons on the occasion. A number 
of persons professed to have experienced a change of heart during 
this meeting. 

In March following a meeting of eleven days' continuance was 
held, during which time the pastor preached fourteen sermons. 
The attendance was good, and some twelve or fifteen professed to 
have found the pearl of great price. May they grow daily in grace 
and the knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ ! On the 7th of 
March, 1857, the fonowing sisters were confirmed: 

Miss Wilhelmina Kain and Miss Christiana Kain. 

May these young sisters prove foithful, and then they have the 
promise of the crown of life ! 

11 



122 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

In May, 1857, Mr. Jacob Reisinger, as delegate of the charge, 
attended Synod at Perryville, Juniata County, Pa. 

On the 23d of August, Mrs. Catharine A. Tressler was received 
as a member by certificate. 

The weekly prayer-meeting and the Sabbath-school have thus 
far been regularly kept up and have generally been well attended. 
May they prosper more and more and prove a great blessing to 
many souls ! 

And now, my brethren, we have to this time somewhat minutely 
traced the history of this church and congregation. To-day, 
October 4th, 1857, we worship within these walls for the last 
time. Sixty years have they stood and echoed the minister's 
voice, and served as a temple of God to many souls ; but soon 
they will be levelled with the ground and be no more. It becomes 
us well at this time to "remember the days of old." Here your 
fathers worshipped in singing hymns and offering prayers to God; 
but their spirits have long since gone to the eternal world and 
their bodies to' the silent grave. This house, also, which they 
erected, will soon be no more. The old must give way to the 
new. And here, in infancy, many of you were dedicated to God 
in holy baptism. Here you first heard the story of the Cro.ss pro- 
claimed by the servant of God. Here, at this altar, you renewed 
your covenant vows on bended knees with tears and fervent 
prayers. Here the heart of many of you was renewed by the Holy 
Ghost, and here you first recorded the Lord's dying love in the 
holy Lord's Supper. How solemn this place ! With this house 
many of you have grown old; and, 0, how many of your brethren, 
who were wont to assemble with you here, have preceded you to 
the world of spirits ! Your aged pastor. Father Heim, who 
preached Jesus to you so long from this pulpit, has long since 
been silenced by death. And after this day, this pulpit will be 
ascended by the minister of the Gospel no more; these walls will 
resound with hymns of praise no more; from this place prayers 
will ascend the hill of the Lord no more; and crowds of attentive 
hearers will throng these seats to listen to the glorious Gospel of 
the Son of God no more. All, all will soon pass away like a 



CHAPTER ir. 123 

dream and be no more. But though we must part with this con- 
secrated house, this temple of God, we will not, no, we cannot 
forget it. Whilst life and memory endure, we will remember 
Zion. Our earliest, liveliest, holiest, and most sacred and cherished 
recollections of divine worship are associated with this house of 
Grod. Here our eyes were often bathed in tears of sorrow and 
joy, and here we found Jesus unspeakably precious to our hearts. 
But we must part with our aged house of God. So then, adieu 
ye sacred walls, — aged house of God, adieu ! "We bless God that 
thou didst serve us so long and so well. 

Let us now go hence, resolved by the grace of God to enter the 
new house of worship with better hearts and renewed spiritual 
strength, so that when we have accomplished our work on earth, 
we may enter that house, not made with hands, eternal in the 
heavens, whose builder and maker is God. The Lord grant it for 
Jesus' sake. Amen.* 

On Thursday, the 10th of December, 1857, some of the mem- 
bers of both denominations met and tore down the seats, pulpit, 
board-ceiling, gallery, and tore up the floor, &c., of the old church, 
and divided the lumber equally between them. For twenty dollars 
the Lutheran Trustees then sold to the German Reformed their 
half of the naked wall and roof, which were soon after also pulled 
down and used by the Reformed for various purposes. This was 
the end of the old, log. Union church. 

Christ's Lutheran church. 

The old Union church having become dilapidated and in winter 
uncomfortable, the want of a new, larger, more convenient, and 
entirely Lutheran church had been deeply felt for some time. 
After some deliberation the following heading of a subscription 
for the erection of such a church was drawn up and circulated 
with encouraging success : 

'' We, the undersigned subscribers, promise to pay the respec- 
tive sums opposite our names towards the erection of a Lutheran 
Church at New Bloomfield, Perry County, Pa., to be used for the 

* So far the discourse. 



124 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

preaching of the Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ according to 
the Old and New Testament, our only infallible rule of faith and 
practice. Dee. 1st, A.D. 1855." 

On the 18th of January, 1856, according to previous notice, 
the members of the Lutheran congregation met in the old Union 
church to elect a Building Committee and consult on other 
matters pertaining to the erection of the new church. A hymn 
was sung. The pastor then offered a prayer, after which he stated 
the object of the meeting. The vote being taken, it was found 
that the following brethren were unanimously elected the build- 
ing committee, viz., Samuel Corap, Dr. Jonas Ickes, Henry Rice, 
John Beaver, Sen., and Jacob Stoufer. This committee was then 
instructed to consult with the German Reformed brethren re- 
specting the propriety of dividing, equally, the ground on the 
southeast front of the graveyard, held jointly by the two denomi- 
nations ; to see other churches and lay before the congregation 
the plan of the proposed new church ; to contract for the erection 
of the new church edifice ; and, finally, to superintend the erec- 
tion of the new church, and see to it that it be built according to 
the contract. Without delay, the committee entered on the dis- 
charge of their duty with energy and unanimity. 

According to previous announcement, the Elders, Deacons, and 
Trustees of both denominations met in the old Union church on 
the 28th of February, 1856, to divide the ground held jointly by 
the Lutherans and German Reformed. Dr. Jonas Ickes was chosen 
President and Rev. Samuel Kuhn Secretary/ of the Convention, 
and the following action was had : 

" The President of the meeting. Dr. Jonas Ickes, stated that 
the object of the meeting was the equal division of that part of 
the church lot, and of the church edifice thereon erected, bounded 
on the south by High Street, east by an alley and the school- 
house, north by the lower or southern graveyard fence, and west 
by lands of Samuel Klinepeter. On due deliberation the follow- 
ing resolutions were adopted : 

" Resolved, 1. That the ground above described, which was the 
joint property of the German Reformed and Lutheran congrega- 



CHAPTER IT. 125 

tions, be divided equally between said congregations, after cutting 
off an alley on tbe east sixteen feet wide, and also one on the west 
twelve feet wide, in order that each of the said denominations 
may employ and use said ground, when so divided, for the purpose 
of holding and using church edifices as their exclusive property. 

"■ Resolved, 2. That the division line is to be occupied by a 
fence to be built and kept in repair at the equal expense of the 
two congregations named. 

^^ Resolved, 3. That neither of the two churches be built in 
from the alleys more than five feet. 

^^ Resolved, 4. That the German Reformed church edifice shall 
be built on the extreme west end and the Lutheran church edifice 
on the extreme east end of said lots, alleys and spaces excepted 
as stated in the 1st and 3d resolutions. 

^^ Resolved, 5. That the error in the deed, relating to the right 
of the Lutheran congregation to a piece of ground purchased 
jointly by the German Reformed and Lutheran congregations for 
tbe use of an additional burying-ground, be so amended and cor- 
rected in the deeds of conveyance as that the Lutheran congre- 
gation may be recognized as joint owner of said piece of land. 

" Resolved, 6, That within the space of two years, dating from 
the first of April, A.D. 1856, to the first of April, A.D. 1858, 
the old church building, now standing on the above named pro- 
perty and known as the 'Union church,' shall be taken down 
and all the material equally divided between the two congre- 
gations owning it. 

" Resolved, 7. That the Trustees of both congregations be in- 
structed to employ Daniel Gantt, Esq., to survey the ground and 
make the deeds of conveyance forthwith, and that the expenses 
thereof be defrayed equally by the two congregations. 

" The minutes having been read, they were, on motion, unani- 
mously approved. The meeting adjourned indefinitely. 

Signed, " Jonas Ickes, 

"President. 

" Samuel Kuhn, 

" Secretary." 

11* 



126 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

On the 3d of May, the same year, the building committee con- 
tracted with Messrs. William Stoufer and Thomas Sutch, Jr., for 
the erection of the Lutheran church-edifice. Dr. Ickes wrote the 
article of agreement.* 

On the 5th of May the building committee and contractors met, 
and, assisted by D. Gantt, Esq., in the use of the compass, staked 
off the ground on which to erect the church-edifice. On the 5th 
of September following, the bricklayers commenced to raise the 
wall. 

The laying of the corner-stone. 

On Friday evening, the 19th of September, 1856, the Rev. 
•Joseph R. Focht preached in the old Union church from Jere- 
miah 8 : 20. 

On Saturday, the 20th, at the same place, the Rev. Joshua 
Evans preached at 10 o'clock, a.m., a suitable discourse from 1 
Pet. 2 : 5. After the delivery of the sermon, about seventy dol- 
lars were obtained by subscription and collection. The assembly 
proceeded then to the foundation of the new church-edifice. Here 
a hymn was sung. The pastor then read the usual liturgical les- 
son, and announced the names of the documents deposited in the 
east corner-stone. The following paper was read, and the docu- 
ments mentioned therein were deposited with it in the corner-stone : 

"/?i the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost. Amen. 

" 1. The Lutheran congregation at New Bloomfield, Perry 
County, Pennsylvania, having deeply felt the want of a new, 
larger, and more convenient house of worship, resolved, in reli- 
ance on the aid of God and for the promotion of His glory, to 
erect this house, wherein the pure Gospel of our Lord Jesus 
Christ is to be preached, and the sacraments of the New Testa- 
ment administered in accordance with the inspired Scriptures of 
the Old and New Testament, our only infallible guide in matters 
of faith and practice. 

* To the great regret of the congregation and remaining members of the 
Building Committee, soon after this Dr. Ickes moved to Monmouth, State of 



CHAPTER II. 127 

" 2. The doctrines to be preached and taught in this church 
shall be in strict and full agreement with the doctrinal basis of 
the General Synod of the Lutheran Church in the United States, 
viz., the doctrinal articles of the Augsburg Confession, which, 
though subordinate to the Holy Scriptures, we believe do teach 
the fundamental doctrines of the word of God. Every doctrine, 
or shade of doctrine, which in anywise deviates from or conflicts 
with this creed or basis of the General Synod of the Lutheran 
Church in the United States, is hereby excluded from this house. 

"3. The Formula of the General Synod of the Lutheran 
Church in the United States for government and discipline, or a 
constitution in no way conflicting with said Formula, is and shall 
always be the rule for the government and discipline of the con- 
gregation worshipping in this church. 

" 4. This house we build with an eye single to the glory of the 
Triune God, Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, for our present and 
eternal good, the good of our children and successors, and the 
good of the community at large. 

" Having thus set forth the rule of our religious belief, the 
form for our government and discipline, and the design for which 
we build this house — 

" Be it therefore known to all to whom these presents shall 
come, that this, the corner-stone of Christ's Lutheran Church at 
New Bloomfield, Perry County, Pennsylvania, was laid in the name 
of the Triune God, on the twentieth day of September, Anno 
Domini, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-six,. and the eighty- 
first year of the Independence of the United States of America, 
Franklin Pierce being President of the United States, and James 
Pollock Governor of the State of Pennsylvania. 

" And when the tooth of time shall have demolished these 
walls, and all those who aided in raising them shall have gone to 
their graves, may those, who shall uncover this stone, learn from 
this document the religious belief and benevolent design of their 
forefathers, and be thereby incited to prosecute and extend the 
great and glorious cause of the Divine Redeemer, to whom with 



128 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

the F.ather and Holy Ghost be given praise and honor, thanks- 
giving and glory, now and forever. Amen. 

" 1. The miniatevs present are : 

Rev. David H. Focht, Pastor loci. 

Rev. Joseph R. Focht, Pastor of the Dillsburg Lutheran 
charge, York County, Pa. 

Rev. Joshua Evans, Pastor of the Newville Lutheran charge, 
Cumberland County, Pa. 

Rev. Samuel Kuhn, Pastor of the German Reformed church 
at New Bloomfield, Perry County, Pa. 

" 2. The church-council consists of the foUoxoinr) persons : 

Rev. D. H. Focht, ex officio chairman. 

John Beaver, Sen., ) ^, , Samuel Comp, 



-, feamuel Uomp, "x 

j- Elders. Jacob Stoufer, [ 
David Tressler, ) 



Beacons. 



" 3. The folloioing are the huikling committee : 
Samuel Comp, John Beaver, Sen., Henry Rice, and Jacob 
Stoufer. 

" 4. The contractors are : Messrs. William Stoufer and Thomas 
Sutch, Jr. 

*' 5. The documents deposited xoitli this paper are the folloioing : 
"1. The Holy Bible (English). 2. The Lutheran Hymn-Book 
(English, revised edition, miniature). 3. Luther's Smaller Cate- 
chism (English, General Synod's 6th edition). 4. Proceedings of 
the 81st Convention of the West Pennsylvania Synod. 5. The 
Lutheran Observer of Sept. 19th, 1856. 6. The Lutheran Al- 
manac (English) for 1856. 7. A copy of each of the county 
papers, viz. : a. The People's Advocate and Perry County Demo- 
crat of Sept. 17th, 1856; h. The Perry County Freeman of Sept. 
18th, 1856 ; c. The Perry County Democrat of Sept. 18th, 1856." 
The documents being all deposited. Rev. S. Kuhn offered a 
prayer to God for His blessing on the exercises. A hymn was 
then sung, after which Rev. J. Evans dismissed the assembly by 
pronouncing the apostolic benediction. Thus ended the exercises 
connected with the laying of the corner-stone. 



CHAPTER II. 129 

On the 23d of October the bricklayers finished the walls. The 
building was then put under roof and closed in. Thus it stood 
till the spring of 1857. The spire and rod were put up in June, 
and on the 20th of October, 1857, the church being now ready for 
consecration, the building committee and contractors made a final 
settlement. The contractors received three thousand dollars for 
their work. The congregation found the bell, the lamps, and all 
the furniture } and the basement was as yet left unfinished. 

Consecration of the Church. 

On Thursday evening, the 22d of October, 1857, the Kev. P. 
Willard preached the first sermon in the new church, from Matt. 
25 : 46. " And these shall go away into everlasting punish- 
ment." Theme : The burial of the soul. On Friday, 28d, at 10 
o'clock, A.M., Rev. George A. Nixdorfi" preached from Psalm 
135 : 3-5. This evening, Rev. P. Willard preached from Prov. 
3 : 15. Theme : The value of religion-. A large congregation 
was in attendance. On Saturday, the 24th, at 10 o'clock, a.m., 
the Rev. B. Kurtz, D.D., LL.D., preached from Matt. 20 : 29-34. 
The tico blind men. This evening, the Rev. J. Evans preached 
from John 16 : 19, 20. On Sunday, the 25th, at 10 o'clock, a.m., 
Rev. Dr. Kurtz preached the dedication sermon to a densely 
crowded congregation, from Matt. 6 : 10, " Thy kingdom come." 
About eight hundred dollars were then secured by subscription 
and collection ; but as over a thousand dollars were required to 
cover all liabilities, and as it was deemed inconsistent to dedicate 
the house to God so long as the expenses thereof were not met, 
the dedication services were deferred till evening. This evening, 
the Rev. P. M. Rightmyer preached from Psalm 137 : 5-6. 
Subscriptions and a collection were then obtained to the amount 
of two hundred and twenty-eight dollars. All liabilities being 
thus met by the liberality of the people, the pastor proceeded to 
consecrate the church by the distinguishing name, Christ's Evan- 
gelical Lutheran Church, to the service of God, according to the 
consecration formula in our Liturgy. Rev. J. Evans offered the 
dedicatory prayer. To-day the church could not near contain all 



130 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

the people assembled. The -work is done; bless the Lord, 0, my 
soul ! This evening, Dr. Kurtz preached also in the Presbyterian 
church at Bloomfield. On Monday evening, the 26th, the pastor 
preached from Heb. 11 : 13, ''And pilgrims on earth." Here 
ended the exercises connected with the dedication of the new 
church. 

This is a neat and well-built brick church-edifice, fiftij-eight 
feet long hy forltj-three feet wide, has a basemen t/or/'y feet square, 
a Gothic front, is surmounted by a tall spire and sweet-toned bell, 
is eligibly located, and reflects much credit on the taste and skill 
of the architects and on the liberality of the congregation. The 
internal arrangement is tasteful and judicious. 

Having attended a series of lectures on the Catechism of the 
Church, and being found possessed of the requisite qualifications, on 
the 14th of November, 1857, Mrs. Louisa Woods was received as a 
member by certificate, and the following persons were confirmed : 

Miss Amanda Jane Kissinger, Miss Cath. Elizabeth Roth, 
" Harriet Fritz, " Marg. Rebecca Eckert, 

" Maria Roth, '' Matilda A. Huss. 

" May we, a little band of love, 
We sinners, sav'd by grace, 
From glory unto glory chang'd, 
Behold thee face to face.'" 

In May, 1858, the Synod of Central Pennsylvania held its 
fourth annual convention in this church. Mr. Samuel Shuman, as 
delegate of the charge, attended the sessions of this convention. 

On the 1st of October, 1858, Mr. William Ferguson and Isabella 
his wife were received as members by certificate, and on the 16th 
of the same month, the following brethren were confirmed : 

David Holmes (baptized), William C. Stahl. 

Henry M. Sweger, 

" Onward, now, to glory move ; 
More than conqu'rors ye shall prove ,■ 
Though oppos'd by many a foe, 
Christian soldiers, onward go I" 



. CHAPTER 11. 131 

In February, 1859, diirinir a protracted meeting, in which the 
pastor was assisted by the Rev. I. J. Stine, it pleased the Lord 
to pour out his spirit on the congregation, and a number of persons 
professed to have found peace by faith in Jesus Christ. Some of 
these, after having been still more fully instructed, were confirmed 
on the 12th of March, 1859, viz. : 

George "W. Black (baptized), Mrs. Angeline Shade, 

Mrs. Sarah E. Rice (baptized). Miss Lydia Svveger. 
" Catharine R. Weaver, 

" Thy pard'ning love so free, so sweet, 
Dear Savior, I adore ; 
keep me at thy sacred feet, 
And let me rove no more." 

In May, 1859, Mr. Samuel Comp, as delegate of the charge, 
attended Synod at Mifflinburg, Union County, Pa. 

On the 12th of November, 1859, Mrs. Lucinda Peck was re- 
ceived as a member by certificate, and the following persons were 
confirmed : 

John Corap, Miss Ann Eliza Holmes, 

Andrew P. Comp, " Mary Eliz. Stoufer, 

Joseph Hair, " Sarah Ann Stoufer. 

" Religion should our thoughts engage, 
Amidst our youthful bloom ; 
"Twill fit us for declining age, 
And for the awful tomb." 

In May, 1860, Mr. Darius J. Long, as delegate of the charge, 
attended Synod at Petersburg, Perry County, Pa. 

On the 4th of August, 1860, Mrs. Mary C. Tressler was re- 
ceived by certificate as a member, and on the 3d of November of 
the same year, the following were confirmed : 

George Tressler, William H. Shade, Miss Margaretta Rice. 

" But drops of grief can ne'er repay 
The debt of love I owe ; 
Here, Lord, I give myself away, 
'Tis all that lean do." 



132 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

In May, 1861, as delegate, Mr. Samuel Comp represented the 
charge in Synod at Belleville, Mifflin County, Pa. 

On the 26th of October, 1861, Mr. George Rempfer and his 
wife Nancy Ann were received by certificate as members of this 
church, and Miss Sophia Swartz and Miss Catharine Ann Eckert 
by confirmation. And on the 12th of April, 1862, Mr. Peter S. 
Albert, and Mr. Joseph Abrams and his wife Amanda, were also 
received by certificate. May these friends be richly blessed in 
their present church-relation ! 

" Kindred in Christ, for his dear sake, 
A hearty welcome here receive : 
May we together now partake 
The joys which only he can give. 

' ' Thus, as the moments pass away. 
We'll love and wonder and adore ; 
And hasten on the glorious day 

When we shall meet to part no more." 

In May, 1862, Mr. Christian Long, Sen., of Newport, as dele- 
gate of the charge, attended Synod at Selinsgrove, Pa. 

The basement story of Christ's Church, hitherto unfinished, 
was completed in May, this spring, at an expense of about two 
hundred dollars. Mr. Isaiah Kitner did the plastering and Mr. 
Joseph Fredericks the carpenter work. The room is forty feet 
square, and well adapted for Sunday-school, weekly lectures, &c. 

For a few general remarks in regard to the Bloomfield pasto- 
rate, the reader is referred to the end of this chapter. jMay 
heaven smile graciously upon all the dear people of this charge! 

The following brethren have at different times served as officers 
since the organization of the English Lutheran congregation in 
June, 1844: 



CHAPTER II. 



133 



Elders, 



Jacob Crist, . 
David Deardorff, 
John Rice, . 
David Tressler, 
William Erb, 
John Beaver, 
William Lenig, 
Samuel Comp, 
Henry Rice, 



Henry C. Hickok, 
George Attig, 
Alex. C. Klink, 
William Erb, 
Dr. Jonas Ickes, 
John Roth, . 
Andrew Hensel, 
Samuel Comp, 
David Tressler, 
Jacob Stoufer, 
John Roth, . 
John Rice, 
Jacob Fritz, . 
George Tressler, 
William Titzel, 



Jacob Crist, . 
David Tressler, 
John Rice, . 
Samuel Comp, 
John Beaver, 



Deacons. 



from 1844 to 1850. 

" 1844 to 1846. 

'' 1846 to 1850. 

" 1850 to 1853. 

" 1850 to 1854. 

" 1855 to 1858. 

" 1855 to 1858. 

" 1858 yet in office, 

" 1858 



from 1844 to 1846. 

" 1844 to 1846. 

" 1846 to 1850. 

" 1846 to 1850. 

" 1850 to 1855. 

" 1850 to 1855. 

" 1850 to 1855. 

" 1855 to 1858. 

" 1855 to 1858. 

" 1855 to 1858. 

" 1858 to 1861. 

" 1858 to 1861. 

" 1858 yet in office. 

" 1861 

" 1861 " 



Trustees. 



from 1844 to 1850. 
« 1850 to 1853. 
" 1850 to 1855. 
" 1855 yet in office. 
" 1855 



134 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

SECTION II. 

ST. Andrew's {SJtn)nan''s) church in saviixe township. 

At the close of the last century and the beginning of the present, 
a large number of Lutherans settled at and east of where Ickes- 
burg was afterwards located, in Juniata, now Saville, Township. 
Of these, the Ickes, Lyons, Shuman, Long, Anders, and a number 
of others, were among the earliest Lutheran families that settled 
here. They had however no church nearer than Loysville or 
Bloomfield, to either of which places they had to go a distance 
from eight to twelve miles. Occasionally they were visited by a 
minister of their own Church, who preached in private dwellings 
and school-houses. Some time in 1812, the 

Rev. Frederick Oberhauser, 
a native of Holland and a man of great literary attainments, but 
lamentably deficient in other respects, located somewhere in To- 
boyne Township, in the vicinity of Blain, and for a number of 
years regularly visited and preached for the scattered members of 
the Lutheran Church in the neighborhood of Ickesburg and some 
other places in that part of Sherman's Valley. About two miles 
east of Ickesburg, at the house of Mr. Andrew Shuman, and at 
Mr. Grist's, he preached once every four weeks for about two 
years. He instructed a class of catechumens in the Catechism in 
this neighborhood, and in 1815, at the house now occupied by 
Mr. Andrew Shuman, near his mill and St. Andrew's Church, he 
had communion, and confirmed the following twelve persons : 
Peter Long, Daniel Hall, 

Henry Long, Miss Elizabeth Long, 

Daniel Sunday, " Rebecca Hall, 

Isaac Frantz, " Elizabeth Beistlein, 

Nicholas Lyons, " Margaret Long, 

John Crist, '* Sarah Hartman. 

A number of the above persons are still with us, and are among 
the most useful aged members of the Church. They are all 



CHAPTER IT. 135 

venerable for age. Forty-seven years ago they united with the 
Church ; six of them have gone to the grave, and six of them 
still linger on its verge. They formed the nucleus of the congre- 
gation organized about fifteen years after the time of their con- 
firmation. A few years hence, and they will be among us no 
more. Most of them were useful in their day, and their names 
are intimately associated with the history of St. Andrew's Church. 
Besides these, and still older than these, we may mention the 
name of Andrew Shuman, who put the roof on the old log 
(Christ's) church at Bloomfield in 1798, donated the land on 
which St, Andrew's Church was erected, and died in peace and a 
bright hope in 1852, aged 78 years, — also Adam and John Lyons, 
and the Anders, — all of whom took a deep interest in having the 
Gospel regularly preached in their midst. These have all gone 
to their rest. 

Rev. Oberhauser preached and administered the sacraments in 
the houses of the members, and deserves the credit of having col- 
lected the members and laid the foundation of a future and pros- 
perous congregation. At a time when the country was distracted 
by the English war he did what he could for Christ. He was 
learned, but unable to make his learning of much avail. As he 
was not supported by preaching, he also practised medicine. 
Thus he endeavored to do good to the bodies and souls of his 
people. On account of the increasing infirmities of age, soon 
after he had confirmed the above persons, he ceased to preach in 
this vicinity. He died on the 12th of April, 1821, aged 75 years. 
His large library, consisting of books chiefly in the Dutch and 
Latin languages, was afterwards sold at half its real value. Some 
forty volumes of it are now in the writer's library.* 

After Rev. Oberhauser ceased to preach here, as the members 
were not regularly organized into a congregation, they scattered 
like sheep without a shepherd. When in 1815, the 

Rev. John William Helm 
commenced to preach at Loysville, in passing from Juniata to 

* See note on p. 95. 



136 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

Perry County, he preached occasionally in private dwellings at 
Ickesburg and the surrounding neighborhood. Still, if the mem- 
bers wished to attend preaching regularly, they had to go to Loys- 
ville or Bloomfield, and to the one or the other of these places the 
young people also went to attend catechetical instruction. At that 
time people did not deem it hard to go on foot from eight to 
twelve miles to preaching and catechizing. Then they cOuld en- 
dure more than they now can, or they had more religion than they 
now have, or, probably, they then endured and possessed what is 
now by many only looked at and professed. " The tree is known 
by his fruit." 

In the spring of 1828, Rev. Heim moved to Loysville, and 
after this he preached in this neighborhood on week-days about 
once every four weeks. Thus the members were collected and 
encouraged, and soon the want of a suitable house wherein to wor- 
ship God was felt, and measures taken to erect such a house. The 
following heading of a subscription was circulated with encourag- 
ing success. 

" We, the subscribers, consider ourselves bound to pay the sum 
opposite to our names to such place as subscribed for,* for the 
purpose of erecting a German church in Saville Township, Perry 
County, near Andrew Shuman's lower mill, or near Ickesburg. 
The 16th day of September, 1829." 

The amount obtained by subscriptions justified the members in 
proceeding to erect the proposed house of worship. A site near 
Shuman's lower mill, and about two miles east of Ickesburg, was 
selected for the location of the church. In the meantime Rev. 
Heim continued to preach in private dwellings. The congregation 
was also regularly organized, and a congregational constitution was 
drawn up. The following brethren constituted the first Lutheran 
church-council here : 

Frederick Anders, Elder. Peter Long, \ m. 

John Beistlein, Deacon. John Swartz, J 

* i. e. either near Shuman's mill or Ickesburg, both places being proposed 
as proper locations. 



CHAPTER II. 137 

Rev. Heim wrote the following constitution in the German lan- 
guage. This instrument of writing is substantially the same as 
the constitution adopted at Loysville in 1827, and we will there- 
fore introduce here only that part of it which differs from the 
Loysville constitution. It makes no mention of the Augsburg 
Confession or any other specific rule, except the Bible, according 
to which the Gospel is to be preached. It reads as follows : 

CONSTITUTION OF ST. ANDREWS CHURCH. 
In the name of God the Father, Son, and Boly Ghost. Amen. 

God is a God of order, and, therefore, every undertaking that 
is to meet with His approbation and redound to His glory, must be 
carried on in the spirit of order, of love, and of peace. As we 
have concluded to erect a house, which we intend to consecrate to 
the service of God, and in which we, our children and their pos- 
terity, will conduct our public worship of God, therefore. We, the 
Church-Council and members of the congregation, do, on this day, 

, 1830, pledge ourselves to observe most conscientiously, and 

as far as lieth in the power of man the following constitution : 

CHAPTER I. 

OF THE CHURCH, THE LAND THERETO BELONaiNG, AND THE GRAVEYARD. 

Our church, called St. Andrew's, built on one acre of land, 
which Andrew Shuman gives for the purpose by a deed of con- 
veyance, situate in Saville Township, Perry County, and State of 
Pennsylvania, is and shall always continue to be a Union church 
in the use of the two religious denominations, namely, the Evan- 
gelical Lutheran and the Evangelical Reformed, and so it shall 
remain until, by mutual agreement of both denominations, the 
one congregation shall purchase the right of the other j and it 
shall at no time be allowed that any other doctrine than the Ev- 
angelical Lutheran and Evangelical Reformed be preached in this 
church, but the doctrines held by these two religious denouiina- 



138 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

tions shall be preached in purity according to the Bible without 
any admixture of error. [The remaining portion of the Constitu- 
tion is word for word the same as the Loysville constitution, and 
need not be repeated here. See pp. 37-41.] 

To ratify the above Constitution, we, the Church-Council and 
members, subscribe our names : 

Lutheran members. Henry Swartz, 

Frederick Anders, Elder, Jacob Comp, 

John Beistlein, Deacon, George Markel, 

Peter Long, 1 ^ ^ Henry Pickard. 

°' >■ Trustees, •' 

John Swartz, ) 

Henry Long, German Reformed memhers. 

Andrew Shuman, John Bealor, 

Nicholas Lyons, Adam Stutzman, 

Adam Lyons, Daniel Bealor, 

Jacob Anders, George Keyser, 

Daniel Long, Joseph Bealor. 

John Anders, 

The above Constitution has long since become in a great measure 
obsolete. For after the resignation o£ Rev. Heim in the spring 
of 1849, each denomination elected its own church-officers, had 
its own treasury, and administered discipline and church affairs 
according to the constitution of its own Synod or General Synod, 
so that the congregations, after that time, had nothing in common, 
except that they worshipped in the same church-edifice. 

On the third of April, 1830, Mr. Andrew Shuman and his 
wife Elizabeth made a deed " for one acre of land for one dollar, 
in trust of Peter Long, John Miller, and John Swartz, of Juniata 
(now Saville) Township, appointed for the Buffalo German Lu- 
theran and Reformed Church," &c. 

Andrew Shuman and John Bealor were elected the building 
committee. The church-edifice was erected in the summer of 
1831, is a log building, thirty-four feet long by twenty-eight feet 
wide. In the fall of 1831, the word of life was first preached in 
the new church, though the gallery on three sides, the pulpit and 



CHAPTER II. 



139 



pews were not constructed till 1833. We have been informed 
that no corner-stone was laid, and the time of the consecration of 
the church, if it ever was formally consecrated, we have not been 
able to learn. 

Rev. Heim preached here regularly once every four weeks, ex- 
clusively in the German language. Having been faithfully in- 
structed in the doctrines of our holy religion, a large class of 
catechumens was confirmed in April, 1833, of which class the 
following persons were the majority : 



Henry Kleckner, 

William Yohn, 

Jacob Reisinger, 

George Kochenderfer, 

David Crist, 

Isaac Long, 

Samuel Orris, 

Isaac Flickinger, 

Henry Flickinger, 

Mrs. Sarah Lyons, 

" Catharine Reisinger, 
" Margaret Yohn, 



Mrs. Catharine Jacobs, 
" Elizabeth Reisinger, 
" Margaret Flickinger, 
" Sarah Smith, 
" Barbara Orris (baptized), 
" Elizabeth Long " 

Miss Catharine Long, 
" Mary Kochenderfer, 
" Elizabeth Shuman, 
" Mary Anders, 
" Elizabeth Frantz. 



It is to be regretted that no church-record was kept whilst 
Father Heim was pastor of the congregation. We are wholly de- 
pendent for names and dates on the frail memory of some mem- 
bers. But as might be expected, the names of many of those 
who were confirmed by Rev. Heim can not be remembered. 

In 1836, the following, and a number of others not now re- 
membered, were confirmed : 



David Swartz, 
George Markel, 
John Hall, 
Simon Yeager, 
Jacob Yeager, 
George Jacobs, 



Daniel Smith, 

Jacob Utly, 

Jonathan Hall, 

Miss Elizabeth Hall, 
'« Mary Hall, 
" Mary Yeager, 



140 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

Jacob Kleckner, Miss Elizabeth Kleckner, 

Joseph Flicldnger, " Elizabeth Zimmerman. 
Jacob Barrick, 
In 1840, a large class of catechumens was confirmed. The fol- 
lowing persons are a few of this class : 

George Wallet, Mrs. Margaret Comp, 
David Long, " Elizabeth Beistlein, 
George Utly, Miss Susan Comp, 
Mrs. Christiana Berkley, " Mary Utly. 
" Sarah Anders, 
In April, 1842, Rev. Heim confirmed a class, the last he con- 
firmed here, consisting of the following persons : 
John Peck, Eliza Flickinger, 
George Long, Margaret Maul, 
Henry Long, Ann Long, 
Christian Wagoner, Diana Kretzing, 
George Kretzing, Catharine Kretzing, , 
John Flickinger, Rebecca Hall, and some others, 
Joanna Wagoner, whose names are not re- 
Christiana Wagoner, membered. 

Whilst pastor of this congregation. Father Heim preached re- 
gularly once in four weeks in the German language. The want 
of preaching in the English language began to be deeply felt. 
Hence the members proposed to Rev. Heim that they would sup- 
port him as they had always done, and that he should continue to 
preach in German, but that he should allow them to associate with 
him a minister who could preach in the English language. To 
this reasonable proposition he objected, and after holding commu- 
nion in May, 1849, he resigned ; and on the 27th of December 
following, he departed this life in peace. In June of the same 
year, he was at this place succeeded as pastor by the 

Rev. Jacob Martin, 
who was then pastor of the Bloomfield charge. Rev. Martin 
preached for this congregation once every three weeks, alternately 



CHAPTER II. 141 

in the German and English languages. A churcli-record was now 
secured, and hereafter baptisms, confirmations, &c., were regularly 
recorded. During the summer of 1849, the church was rough- 
cast outside, and other repairs were made, as the following head- 
ing of a subscription shows : 

" We, the subscribers, promise to pay to the Trustees of St. 
Andrew's Church the several sums annexed to our names, to be 
applied by them to repairing the said church by plastering, paint- 
ing, and whatever else may be by them and the other members 
thought necessary, and also to make all suitable repairs to the 
graveyard in fencing the same. 1849." 

After being duly instructed and found properly qualified, on 
Saturday, the 8th of June, 1850, the following persons were con- 
firmed : 

Robert Survell (baptized), Mrs. Nancy Flickinger, 
James Campbell " " Lydia Ann Hench, 

Joseph Flickinger, Miss Elizabeth Long, 
John Lyons, " Sarah Lyons, 

Henry Long, " Catharine Shuman, 

Darius J. Long, " Margaret Long, 

Mrs. Catharine Frey, " Margaret Long. 

" Susan Reisinger, 

On the 3d of January, 1851, the following persons were re- 
ceived by confirmation : 

David Barriek, Hugh Campbell, David Frey. 

Having served the congregation about two years and ten 
months, Rev. Martin resigned the Bloomfield charge on the 1st 
of April, 1852, and was succeeded on the 1st of June following 
by the 

Hev. William Gerhardt, 

who preached here once every three weeks, alternately in the Ger- 
man and English languages. Having been faithfully instructed 
in the Catechism of the Church, on Saturday, the 18th of June, 



142 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

1853, the following persons were admitted to full communion by 
the rite of confirmation : 



Andrew J. Shuman, 


Miss Julian Lyons, 


Frederick Barrick, 


" Susan Shuman, 


Henry Alexander Long, 


" Catharine Swartz, 


Miss Joanna Long, 


" Maria Spriggle (baptized). 


" Cath. Ellen Long, 


" Catharine Klcckner, 


" Rebecca Long, 


" Mary A. Reisinger, 


" Mary Ellen Long, 


" Margaret Barrick. 



On Sunday, the 19th of June, Rev. Gerhardt, at one and the 
same time, preached a sacramental sermon, a funeral sermon, and 
his farewell sermon, from 2 Cor. 13 : 14, having served the con- 
gregation about one year. The Bloomfield charge was then va- 
cant about eight months. On the 1st of March, 1854, the 

Rev. Adam Height, 
having accepted a call from the charge, commenced his pastoral 
labors here. He preached to this congregation once every three 
weeks. The use of the German language in the pulpit was 
scarcely needed at this time. 

On Saturday, the 19th of March, Henry Reisinger was admitted 
to full membership by confirmation, and John Shuman and Mary 
A. Reisinger were received by certificate. Having preached here 
about seven months, in September, 1854, Rev. Height ceased his 
ministry. The Bloomfield charge was again vacant about eight 
months. Having accepted a unanimous call from the Bloomfield 
charge, on the 1st of June, 1855, the 

Rev. David H. Foclit 
entered on the discharge of his ministerial labors here. He 
preached his introductory sermon at St. Andrew's Church on 
Sunday, the 3d of June, from Exod. 33 : 14, to a large and at- 
tentive congregation. At this time the German language in the 
pulpit is required no more. What a change a short time has 
wrought ! Not longer than six or seven years ago all the preach- 
ing in this church was in the German language, and Father Heiin 
thought* the request of the members to have English preaching. 



CHAPTER II. 143 

unreasonable and wholly unnecessary. He meant it well, but was 
clearly behind the wants of the congregation, and the people in 
general in Perry County, on the subject of English preaching. 

Having been faithfully instructed, the following persons were 
confirmed on the 27th of October, 1855 : 

William Hencb, Miss Eheuamma Long, 

Daniel Lyons, " Mary Ann Swartz, 

Henry F. Long, " Matilda Steinberg, 

Miss Sarah Berkley (baptized), '* Mary Catharine Shuman, 
" Elizabeth Long, " Sarah Ann Shuman, 

" Caroline Long, '* Lydia Ann Smith. 

" Ellen Lyons, 

" Jesus I we come at thy command, 

With faith, and hope, and humble zeal — 
Eesign our spirits to thy hand, 

To mould and guide us at thy will." 

On the 12th of April, 1856, George Jacobs was confirmed, and 
on the 7th of September following, Mrs. Margaret A. Crist was 
received by certificate. On the 18th of October, the same year, 
Mr. Andrew Shuman was received by certificate, and the follow- 
ing persons were confirmed : 

Jeremiah Lyons, Miss Mary Kleckner, 

William Trostle, Mrs. Agnes Shuman (baptized). 

Miss Rebecca Lyons, 

' ' Prepare us, Lord, by grace dirine. 
For thy bright courts on high ; 
Then bid our spirits rise and join 
The chorus of the sky." 

On the 25th of April, 1857, the following persons were admitted 
to full communion by confirmation : 

John K. Shuman, Oliver Reisinger, 

Samuel Markel, Mrs. Mary Ann Reisinger, 

" How firm a foundation, ye saints of the Lord, 
Is laid for your faith in his excellent word ! 
What more can he say than to you he has said ? 
You who unto Jesus for refuge have fled." 



144 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

On the 10th of October, 1857, the following two persons were 
received to full communion by confirmation : 

Daniel Kleckner, Miss Rebecca Jane Kleckner. 

" watch, and fight, and pray ; 
The battle ne'er give o'er ; 
Renew it boldly every day, 
And help divine implore." 

On the 5th of November, 1859, Mr. John M. McKee and 
Mrs. Catharine Glock, and on the 22d of April, 1860, Mr. Sam- 
uel Clouser, were received as members by certificate. The Lord 
bless these dear friends ! 

Having been instructed in the Catechism every week for more 
than four months, on the 8th of December, 1860, Mr. Job Shinn 
was received by certificate, and the following persons were con- 
firmed : 

Jacob B. Shuman, Miss "Charity Long, 

Peter Long, " Susan Long, 

Jacob H. Kleckner, " Catharine Long, 

John T. Baker (baptized), '^ Elizabeth Ann Long, 

Robert Paden, " " Sarah Long, 

Mrs. Maria Paden, " " Mary Ann Klinepeter, 

Miss Mary Eliz.Blain (baptized), " Cath. Angeline Barrick, 
" Rebecca Shuman, 

" ! to grace how great a debtor 
Daily I'm constrain'd to be ! 
Let that grace, Lord, like a fetter. 
Bind my wand'ring heart to thee ! 

" Prone to wander, Lord, I feel it ; 
Prone to leave the God I love — 
Here's my heart, Lord, take and seal it, 
Seal it from thy courts above." 

This congregation, now numbering about one hundred mem- 
bers, has a weekly prayer-meeting and a Sunday-school, both of 
which are well attended. Piety and intelligence are advancing 



CHAPTER IT. 



145 



among the members, and benevolence and every good cause meet 
a hearty response at their hands. 

Since 1849, when Rev. Heim resigned, the following brethren 
have at different times served as officers of this congregation : 



Elders. 



Andrew Shuman, Sen. 
Nicholas Lyons, 
Henry Long, 
Jeremiah Burkepile, 
Samuel Shuman, . 
Isaac Long, . 
Andrew Shuman, . 



from 1849 to 1852. 
1849 to 1856. 
1852 to 1856. 
1856 to 1857. 

1856 to 1858. 

1857 yet in office. 
1858 



Deacons. 



George Kochenderfer, 
Isaac Long, . 
Samuel Shuman, 
Daniel Long, 
David Barrick, 
John K. Shuman, 
Darius J. Long, 
John Lyons, . 
Daniel Lyons, 
Henry Long, 



from 1849 to 1851. 

" 1849 to 1858. 

" 1851 to 1856. 

" 1853 to 1857. 

" 1856 to 1858. 

'' 1858 to 1860. 

" 1857 to 1861. 

'' 1860 to 1861. 

'* 1861 now in office. 

" 1861 '' 



Trustees. 



Christopher Wagner, 
Peter Lono:, . 



from 1849 to 1856. 
'' 1856 to 1861. 



13 



146 CHURCH I'S between the mountains. 

SECTION III. 

ST. John's [Bcalor\s) churcu near markeltili.e, juxiata township. 

In the beginning of the present century a number of Lutheran 
families settled in Juniata Township, as the Beistleins, Smiths, 
Lenigs, Swartzs, Grists, Burrels, and others. Most of these 
attended preaching at Bloomfield, and some few at Lojsville, the 
distance of six to twelve miles. After the erection of St. An- 
drew's (Shuman's) Church in 1881, most of them worshipped 
there, and the rest at Bloomfield. All however were deeply im- 
pressed with the urgent necessity of having the Gospel preached 
in their midst. Hence, in 1839, 

Rev. John Willuim Tleim 

commenced to preach for them occasionally in the school-house 
on the hill near Bosserman's mill, now near Markelville. At the 
same time a Sunday-school was also started and held at this 
school-house. These visits of Father Heim convinced the mem- 
bers more than ever of the necessity and advantage of having 
among them the stated ministrations of the Gospel and of a suit- 
able house of worship. The attendance at the school-house was 
very encouraging. Measures were then taken to erect, as soon 
as practicable, a house of worship conjointly with a sister denomi- 
nation. The following is a copy of the heading of the subscrip- 
tion circulated for aid towards the erection of the proposed church- 
edifice : 

"We, the undersigned, citizens of Juniata Township and parts 
adjacent, in Perry County, composed of Lutheran and Presby- 
terian professors, feeling ourselves in a great measure destitute of 
the preaching of the Gospel among us, to obviate which, we do 
hereby agree to form a union to enable us to raise money for the 
erection of a house for public worship in the neighborhood of 
William Bosserman's mill on Big Buffalo, and on the land of 
Marx Bealor, who offers a piece of land for that purpose as a free 
donation; and wc cordially invite the friends of religion, both 



CHAPTER II, 147 

German and English, to join us in this undertaking, and be 
sharers in the privileges and advantages of the proposed insti- 
tution, believing as we do, that righteousness exalteth a nation, 
and sin is the reproacJi of any inople. 

"We, therefore, to realize said object, do promise to pay the 
several sums annexed to our names respectively, to such person 
or persons as shall be hereafter appointed for that purpose. Wit- 
ness our hands the 7th January, 1840." 

Messrs. Daniel Swartz and John Bealor were appointed the 
building committee. A sufficient amount was soon subscribed to 
justify the building committee to proceed in erecting the proposed 
house of worship. Mr. Marx Bealor also deeded a piece of land 
to the use of the congregations as the site for the church-edifice 
and the graveyard.* From this deed we make the following 
extract : 

" This Indenture made the 7th day of August, 1840, between 
Marks Bealor of Juniata Township, Perry County, State of Penn- 
sylvania, and his wife Elizabeth, of the one part, and Philip 
Myers, Samuel Lupfer and William Bosserraan, Trustees of a 
religious society in said township and parts adjacent, composed of 
Lutherans and Presbyterians united, now about erecting them- 
selves into a congregation, of the other part, — Witnesseth that 
the said Mark Bealor and Elizabeth his wife, for and in considera- 
tion of the many blessings of the Gospel among men and in order 
to secure and promote it in this corner for the happiness and 
comfort of themselves, their children, and neighbors, and all 
others, and also for and in consideration of one dollar to them in 
hand paid by the said Trustees and before the ensealing and de- 
livering thereof, the receipt whereof they do hereby acknowledge 
and thereof acquit and forever discharge the said Trustees above 

* On the piece of land offered by Mr. Marx Bealor, and now embraced in 
the graveyard adjoining the church, a number of persons were buried long 
before the church was built. The tombstone of the first person buried here, 
bears the following inscription in German: " Iller ruheii die Geheine von 
Sarah Bealor, Tochter von M. Bealor, Starb Mi August, 1810. Alter 8 
Jahr, 8 Monat, und 26 Tage.'' 



148 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

named, their successors and assigns, do by these presents grant, 
bargain, sell, &c., — tivo and one-half i^er dies over one-half acre, 
to have and to hold the said piece or lot of ground, to the said 
Philip Myers, Samuel Lupfer and William Bosserraan, Trustees 
aforesaid, their successors and assigns forever, for the establish- 
ment and support of a church and suitable pastors for said con- 
gregation according to justice and their articles of association," &c. 
See, Deed-Book, Letter I, p. 272. The above article of sub- 
scription and deed were written by George Monroe, Esq. 

The Lutheran congregation was regularly organized in October, 
1840, by the election and installation of Mr. John Beistlein, 
Elder, and of Mr. Daniel Swartz, Deacon. These were the first 
officers of the congregation. 

Kev. Heim composed also the following church constitution 
in the German language : 

CONSTITUTION OF ST. JOHN'S CHURCH. 

In the name of God the Father, of the Son, and of the Holy 
Ghost. Amen. 

God is a God of order, and therefore everything that is to meet 
with His approbation and redound to His glory must be done in 
the spirit of order, of love and peace. We, the Church-Council 
and Church-members, do therefore, on this 4th day of October, 
1840, bind ourselves to observe most faithfully and in as far as in 
us lies the following Constitution : 



CHAPTER I. 

OF THE CHTJRCH AND GRAVEYARD. 

Our church, called , erected on the ground given for the 

purpose by Marcus Bealor, containing eighty-two rods, situate in 
Juniata Township, Perry County, and State of Pennsylvania, is 
and shall always remain a Union church for the use of the two 
religious denominations, namely, the Evangelical Lutheran and 



CHAPTER II. 



149 



Evangelical Keformed, and so it shall continue until by mutual 
agreement the one denomination purchase the right of the other. 
And in this church no other doctrine shall be preached and taught 
than that of the Evangelical Lutheran and Evangelical Reformed 
Churches according to the Bible and the Augsburg Confession. 
One denomination shall not interfere in the divine worship of the 
other, &c. [The remaining part of this Constitution is in every 
respect the same as that prepared for the church at Loysville, and 
therefore we refer the reader to that. See pp. 37-41.] 

To the above Constitution, we, the Church-Council and Church- 
members, herewith subscribe our names : 



John Bealor, 
Samuel Lupfer, 
Joseph Bealor, 
John Sosseman, 
John Dumm, 
John Crist, 
Joseph Carl, 
David Bealor, 



Philip Reamer, 
George Gibbons, 
John Leiby, 
Wm. Raffinsberger, 
John Beistlein, 
Philip Myer, 
George Carl, 



John Myer, 
Samuel ReisdorflF, 
Daniel Swartz, 
Jacob Lenig, 
Frederick Reisdorff, 
Michael Ear hart, 
Jonas J. Smith. 



The above Constitution has gone into disuse, and each congre- 
gation manages its affairs according to its own Synod's form of 
government and discipline. 

The corner-stone of the new church was laid in October, 1840, 
when Rev. Heim and Rev. Fred. Becher officiated. A difference 
arose among the members respecting the plan on which the church 
edifice was to be built. Some were in favor of a gallery on three 
sides, and some were opposed to having any gallery. The ques- 
tion was then put to vote. The majority voted to have no gallery 
at all; but for the sake of peace the majority yielded to the 
minority, and in this way peace was easily restored and the edifice 
was raised, though for a long time some Avere dissatisfied, and 
perhaps justly too, with the three galleries. The edifice is thirfy- 
five feet long by thirty feet wide. It is a log-frame structure. 
Inside it has high galleries on three sides, supported by heavy 
posts and cross-beams, a high pulpit, high seats, and is in many 
13* 



150 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

respects badly arranged. It seems to have been adapted on pur- 
pose to make preaching go hard. It is truly surprising that in 
those days a much cheaper way of building far more convenient 
church-edifices did not suggest itself to the minds of the people 
in Perry County. 

The church was dedicated in April, 1841, and called St. John's 
Church. ' Rev. Heim and Rev. Ernst were present and preached 
on the occasion. The Sunday-school was now removed to the 
church. 

Rev. Heim preached here once every four weeks, exclusively 
in the German language. The members scattered throughout 
Juniata Township were collected and much encouraged by having 
a church and regular preaching in their midst. The Sunday- 
school was encouraged and flourished. 

After having attended a course of lectures on the Catechism of 
the Church, on Saturday, the 2d of December, 1843, the follow- 
ing persons were admitted to communion by confirmation : 

David Titzel, Mrs. Nancy Zollenberger, 

Michael Smith, Miss Lydia Carl, 

Jonas Beistlein, " Catharine Frautz, 

Michael Kleckner, " Mary Crist, 

Mrs. Ann Mary Kleckner, " Sarah A. Burrel, 

" Margaret Crist, " Susan Beistlein, 

" Margaret Schultz, " Margaret Reisdorff. 
" Mary Weiskessel, 

On Sunday (December 3d), the whole number of communi- 
cants was seventy-one, though it is certain that they were not all 
members of this congregation. Rev. Heim had communion here 
but once a year, and, with the above exception, always in spring, 
and sometimes on week-days, as follows : Sunday, May 19th, 
1844, sixty-three communicants; Sunday, March 23d, 1845, forty- 
five communicants ; Sunday, April 19th, 1846, forty-nine com- 
municants ; Sunday, May 16th, 1847, fifty communicants ; Wed- 
nesday, April 19th, 1848, forty-nine communicants; and Wed- 
nesday, April 18th, 1849, catechumens and old members, fifty 



CHAPTER II. 151 

communicants. This was the last communion he held here. On 
Tuesday previous, namely, the 17th of April, 1849, the following 
persons were confirmed : 

George W. Titzel, Peter Beistlein, 

Josiah R. Titzel, Miss Rebecca Titzel, 
Daniel Crist, " Magdalene Lenig, 

Jonas Lenig, " Catharine Beistlein, 

Edward Kepner, ^' Margaret Beistlein. 

Rev. Father Heim fell asleep in Jesus on the 27th of Decem- 
ber, 1849, having organized and served the congregation as pastor 
about ten years. As some of the catechumens could not read the 
German language, Father Heira attempted sometimes to explain 
to them the doctrines of our religion in English, though this was 
difficult for him to do and very unsatisfactory to the catechumens. 
Preaching in the English language had here become highly neces- 
sary. 

In 1849, the church was roughcast outside and plastered in- 
side, and other improvements were made. 

According to a division made of the charges served by Rev. 
Heim and Rev. Martin, at Bloomfield, in February, 1850 (see 
pp. 52-54), this congregation was attached to the Bloomfield 
charge, and early in the spring of 1850, the 

Rev. Jacob 3Iartm 

commenced his pastoral labors here. On the 19th of May, 1850, 
he held the first communion at this place, when thirty-seven mem- 
bers communed. He preached here once every three weeks, 
about one-third in the English language. Some of the fathers 
were very much displeased at him for preaching in 'the English 
language in their church, — in the church thei/ had built. They 
thought it an unwarrantable innovation, a new measure not to be 
tolerated. But the fathers were gradually overruled by the press- 
ing want of the sons. The transition from the German to the 
English language was slowly but surely going on. The German- 
speaking portion of the congregation blamed Rev. Martin for in- 



152 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

troducing English preaching, and were offended at him for it. 
Hence, at his second communion, on the 3d of November, 1850, 
only twenty-nine communed. Time has, however, fully vindicated 
the course Rev. Martin pursued in this matter. He did a good 
work, and prepared the way for his successors. After Rev. Helm's 
departure not a single person has, to this time (1862), come to be 
catechized in the German language. Thus clearly showing the 
folly of resisting the introduction of the use of the English lan- 
guage. 

During the winter of 1851, Rev. Martin instructed a class of 
catechumens in the Catechism, and on Saturday, the 22d of March, 
the same year, the following persons were confirmed : 

William T. Kepner, Miss Mary Frantz, 

Miss Mary Ann Burd, " Mary A. Raffinsberger, 

" Priscilla Jane Boyer, " Hannah Bealor, 

" Julian Burd, " Mary Beistlein. 
" Susan Frantz, 

On Sunday, the 23d, the whole number of communicants was 
forty-nine. On Sunday, the 4th of March, 1852, Rev. Martin 
held his last communion here, and also, at the same time, he 
preached his farewell sermon, having served the congregation 
about two years. In June following, he was succeeded by the 

Rev. William Gerhardt, 

who preached here once every three weeks, alternately in the 
German and English languages. The Lutheran congregation 
bought at this time a church-record, and after this entries were 
regularly made of baptisms, confirmations, &c. The young mem- 
bers demanded that half of the preaching should be in the Eng- 
lish language, and the old members could no longer deny the re- 
quest. On the 14th of May, 1853, the following persons were 
confirmed : 

George Fleisher, John A. Beistlein, 

William Titzel, Samuel Beistlein, 



CHAPTER II. 153 

Ezra P. Titzel, Miss Elizabeth Miller, 

Levi Smith, " Lucetta Smith, 

John Beistlein, " Mary Zollenberger. 

Rev. Gerhardt resigned and preached his farewell sermon at 
this place on the 12th of June, 1853, having served the congre- 
gation only about one year. The Bloomfield charge was then 
vacant about eight months. Having accepted a call from the 
charge, the 

Rev. Adam Height 
commenced his pastoral labors here on the 1st of March, 1854. 
Having preached only about seven months in the charge, for rea- 
sons not necessary to state, he ceased his ministry in September 
of the same year. The charge was then again vacant about eight 
months. Having accepted a call from the congregations compos- 
ing the Bloomfield charge, the 

Rev. D. H. Focht 
entered on the discharge of his ministerial duties in the charge 
on the 1st of June, 1855, and preached his introductory sermon 
at St. John's Church, on Sunday, the 10th of June, from Col. 
1 : 28 : '' Whom (Christ) we preach, warning every man, and 
teaching every man in all wisdom, that we may present every 
man perfect in Christ Jesus." 

Having been for some time faithfully instructed in the Cate- 
chism in the fundamental doctrines of the Christian religion, on 
Saturday, the 24th of November, 1855, the following persons were 
confirmed : 

David Wolf, Miss Elizabeth Anders, 

John S. Dougherty (baptized), " Sophia Yeager, 

Mrs. Eliza Yeager, " " Hetta Swartz, 

Miss Caroline Anders, " Sarah Ann Burrel. 

Two of the above have since gone to the eternal world. They 
died in peace and the hope of heaven. 

"0 Lord of hosts, thou God of grace, 
How blest, divinely blest, is he 
"Who trusts thy love and seeks thy face, 
And fixes all his hopes on thee !" 



154 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

On Sunday, the 25th, the whole number of communing mem- 
bers was seventy-five. Fifteen others also communed. This 
meeting commenced on Tuesday evening previous. The catechu- 
mens, who had hitherto met only once a week, were now met once 
every day, and received instruction and engaged in singing and 
prayer. The Gospel was preached every evening during the week. 
These exercises were well attended, and lasting impressions for 
good were made and precious souls converted to God. 

On the 10th of April, 1856, Mr. David R. P. Bealor and his 
wife Nancy were received as members of this congregation by 
certificate, and on the 25th of October of the same year the fol- 
lowing persons were confirmed : 

Lemuel 0. Foose, Mrs. Elizabeth Beistlein, 

William J. Foose, Miss Elizabeth Strasser, 

Levi Swartz, " Sarah A. Taylor, 

Isaac Strasser (baptized), " Eve Smith, 

Mrs. Sarah Smith " " Mary Ann Brown, 

Miss Marg. Murphy " " Magdalene Brown. 

"The soul that on Jesus hath lean'd for repose, 
I will not, I cannot desert to his foes ; 
That soul, though all hell should endeavor to shake, 
I'll never — no, never — no, never forsake I" 

The prayer-meeting and Sunday-school are well attended, and 
piety and intelligence are advancing among this people. Surely 
the Lord has richly blessed the members of this congregation, for 
which we are unfeignedly thankful. Having labored another 
year and diligently catechized a class of catechumens, on the 28th 
of November, 1857, the following persons were confirmed : 

Emanuel Whitekettle, Miss Mary Ann Crist, 
Charles Whitekettle, " Cath. Elizabeth Crist, 

Wm. Henry Flickinger, " Lydia Ann Smith, 

Levi Hiram Flickinger, " Martha Kepner, 

David Beistlein, " Sarah A. Murphy (bap). 

Two of the above young brethren have since gone to their long 
rest in heaven. They fell asleep in Jesus. 



CHAPTER II. 155 

"Who, -who would live always, away from his God; 
Away from yon heav'n, that blissful abode, 
Where the rivers of pleasure flow o'er the bright plains. 
And the noontide of glory eternally reigns : 
Where the saints of all ages in harmony meet 
Their Savior and brethren, transported to greet ; 
While anthems of rapture unceasingly roll, 
And the smile of the Lord is the feast of the soul." 

At this time (on Sunday, the 29th), eighty-two members com- 
muned, and on account of sickness and other causes twelve mem- 
bers were absent. This meeting commenced on Tuesday the 24th, 
and closed on Monday evening the 80th. During this time the 
pastor catechized the youth once every day and preached every 
evening and also in daytime. The attendance was good, and the 
Lord was present to bless. All the catechumens and a number of 
others professed to have found peace to their souls in an entire 
consecration of themselves to God by faith in Jesus Christ. May 
they prove faithful to their covenant vow, and let their light shine 
by living a godly life ! 

In October, 1859, Dr. Jacob M. Miller was received as a mem- 
ber of this congregation. After having been instructed in the 
Catechism about four months, and being found possessed of the 
requisite doctrinal and spiritual attainments, on the 24th of No- 
vember, 1860, the following persons were confirmed : 

Josiah W. Houanstine, Miss Sarah Ellen Boyer (bapt.), 

Daniel D. Rey, " Margaret Burrel, 

Miss Mary Kepner, "■ Elizabeth Whitekettle, 

" Sarah Ellen Foose, " Sarah Whitekettle, 

" Eliz. Orwan (baptized), " Catharine Burrel, 
" Marg. Orwan " " Barbara Burrel. 

" may my heart, by grace renew'd, 
Be my Redeemer's throne ; 
And be my stubborn will subdu'd, 
His government to own. 

"Let deep repentance, faith, and love 
Be join' d with godly fear ; 
And all my conversation prove 
My heart to be sincere." 



156 



cnuRcriEs between the mountains. 



In March, 1861, Prof. George W. Leisber and his wife Catha- 
rine, George Long and his wife Mary, and John Lyons, were re- 
ceived as members of this congregation. May the Lord bless 
these dear friends and make them abundantly useful in their pre- 
sent church relation ! 

On the 16th of November, 1861, Mrs. Jane G. Titzel was re- 
ceived by certificate as a member, and on the 22d of March, 1862, 
Mr. John P. Boyer and his wife Jane Ann were confirmed. The 
Lord bless these friends ! 

The members of this congregation, at this time numbering 
about one hundred, are making commendable progress in the 
cause of souls and the blessed Redeemer. The use of the German 
language in the pulpit will, before long, be among the things that 
were. This is the only congregation of the Bloom field charge 
that still requires an occasional sermon in German ; but as the 
aged pass gradually away, and as the youth all speak the English, 
the use of the German language must necessarily pass soon away. 

Since the organization of this congregation in 1840, the follow- 
ing; brethren have at difi"erent times served it as its ofl&cers : 



Elders. 



John Beistlein, 
Jacob Lenig, . 
Jacob Kepner, 
David Crist, Esq., 
George Fleisher, 



from 1840 to 1852. 
'' 1852 to 1859. 
" 1855 to 1859. 
" 1859 yet in office. 
" 1859 " 



Deacons. 



Daniel Swartz, Sen., 
John Fusselman, 
David Crist, Esq., 
Jonas J. Smith, 
Jacob Lenig, 
Jacob Kepner, 
Thomas Lenig, 
Henry Titzel, 



from 1840 to 1841. 

<' 1841 to 1843. 

'' 1843 to 1844. 

" 1844 to 1846. 

" 1846 to 1847. 

'< 1847 to 1849. 

'' 1849 to 1850. 

'< 1850 to 1857. 



CHAPTER II. 



157 



George Fleisher, . 
James Foose, 
Jonas J. Smith, 
David R. P. Bealor, 
Josepli Flickinger, 
Thomas Lenig, 
Lemuel 0. Foose, . 
Ezra P. Titzel, 
John Beistlein, 



Valentine Burrel, 
Jacob Lenig, . 
Valentine Burrel, 
Jacob Lenig, 
James Foose, 
Thomas Lenia:, 



Trustees. 



from 1852 to 1855. 

" 1855 to 1858. 

" 1855 to 1859. 

" 1857 to 1860. 

" 1858 to 1861. 

" 1859 jet in office. 

" 1860 resigned. 

" 1860 yet in office. 

" 1861 " 



from 1843 to 1851 
" 1851 to 1854, 
" 1854 to 1860 
" 1855 to 1860 
" 1860 yet in 
" 1860 " 



SECTION IV. 



THE CONGREGATION AT NEWPORT. 



Newport, known for many years as Reiderville, was laid out by 
Mr. Daniel Reider in about 1814. Its growth was very slow till 
the canal was made in 1830. After that it improved gradually. 
The town is located on the west bank of the Juniata, and the 
canal and Pennsylvania railway pass through it. 

At the beginning of the present century a number of Lutheran 
families settled along the Juniata and in the vicinity of Newport. 
These attended preaching at Bloomfield, a distance from five to 
ten miles, as they had no church of their own nearer at hand. 
As early as 1830, the • 

Rev. John William Heim 

preached for them occasionally on week-days in school-houses and 

14 



158 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

private dwellings. In 1835, a number of persons from near New- 
port were confirmed at Bloomfield. The town having gTown and 
the number of members increased, after this Kev. Heim preached 
regularly at Newport once every four weeks in a brick school- 
house. He preached exclusively in the German language. In 
1842, when he was requested to preach also in the English lan- 
guage, he told his hearers : "Now I will come no more." He 
did not organize a congregation here; this was only one of his 
preaching stations. The members went to Bloomfield on occasions 
of communion, and there the young people were also catechized 
and confirmed. Rev. Heim however collected the members here, 
and thus accomplished good. In the fall of 1843, 

Rev. Levi T. Williams, 

who had located at Petersburg, now Duncannon, as a sort of 
missionary for that neighborhood, was invited by some of the 
members at Newport to visit and preach for them. He accepted 
the invitation, and in November, 1843, he preached for the first 
time at Newport, in the old brick school-house, from Acts 10 : 29, 
" Therefore came I unto you without gainsaying, as soon as I was 
sent for. I ask, therefore, for what intent ye have sent for me ?" 

With but few exceptions. Rev. Williams preached in the old 
brick school-house till he resigned in September, 1845. He 
preached once every four weeks, and only an occasional sermon in 
the German language. After he had resigned the German was 
required by the members no more. 

The congregation was regularly organized on the 14th of 
January, 1844, when the following brethren were elected and in- 
stalled as its first officers : 

Godfrey Lenig, ] 
Daniel Reider, Sen., Elder. „ r» c '^..i i Deacons. 

' ' Henry D. Smith, ) 

Early in the spring of 1844, near the canal, a filthy brick ware- 
house was fitted up to hold in it a protracted meeting. When 
the time for holding the meeting had come, the use of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal meeting-house was generously offered for the pur- 



CHAPTER II. 159 

pose, and the meeting was then held here with encouraging 
success. 

The first communion was held on the 2d of June, 1844, in the 
Methodist meeting-house. On Saturday previous, the 1st of 
June, after having been duly instructed, the following persons 
were confirmed : 

Christian Long, Sen. (baptized), Mrs. Ann Long, 

David Deardorfi" " Miss Sarah Smith, 

John Wilson, Mrs. N. Horting (baptized), 

Benjamin Horting, Miss Rebecca Hobble " 

The second communion was held on the 17th of November, 
1844. On Saturday previous, the 16th of November, the follow- 
ing persons were confirmed : 

Mrs. Priscilla Reider, Miss Catharine Zigler, 

Miss Sarah Ann Nailer, Mrs. Anna Klink (baptized), 

" Margaretta Bell, Miss Sarah Miller, by certificate. 

For want of a church the congregation labored under great dis- 
advantage. But as the membership was as yet comparatively 
small, they formed a union with others to build a Union church. 
The materials for the proposed church were nearly all collected 
during the latter part of the summer of 1845. Rev. Williams 
resigned and preached his farewell sermon in September, 1845, 
from 1 Cor. 16 : 23, "The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be 
with you." 

Rev. Lloyd Knight 

took charge of this congregation on the 1st of October, 1845, and 
served it in connection with Bloomfield. He preached here once 
every three weeks in the old brick school-house until the new 
church was completed. On Saturday the 10th of January, 1846, 
the following persons were confirmed : 

Abraham Horting, Miss Catharine Smith, 

Charles Bressler, Mrs. Cordelia Henning, 

Mrs. Ann Hortin"-, Miss Eve E. Brown. 



160 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

On Sunday, the 11th, at the first communion Rev. Knight 
held here, the whole number of communicant members was twenty- 
nine. 

The building committee, appointed to superintend the erection 
of the church, consisted of Messrs. Christian Long, A. Ziegler, 
and A. B. Maxwell. A deed for a lot of ground was executed. 
From this deed we give the following extract : 

" Know all men by these presents, that we, John Wiley of the 
Borough of Newport, Perry County, and State of Pennsylvania, 
and Barbara his wife, for and in consideration of seventy-five 
dollars, to us in hand paid, at the ensealing thereof, by A. B. 
Maxwell, Jacob Loy and John Fickes, Trustees of the Church, 
named and styled. The Union Church of Newport, the receipt of 
which is hereby acknowledged, do grant, bargain, sell, &c., ... to 
the Trustees aforesaid, ... a certain lot of ground, ... for the 
purpose of erecting a church thereon, to be called by the name, 
style and title of The Union Church of Newport," kc. This deed 
was acknowledged on the 1st day of May, 1846. See Deed 
Book, Letter L., p. 446. 

The corner-stone of the church was laid on Tuesday the 12th 
of May, 1846, at 2 o'clock, p.m. Rev. Messrs. Knight and ShuU 
"were present and ofl&ciated on the occasion. The church was 
consecrated to the service of God on Whit-Sunday the 23d of 
May, 1847, as The Union Church of Newport. Rev. Messrs. 
Knight, Weaver and Shull participated in the exercises of this 
occasion. The church-edifice is a frame structure, forty-two by 
forty-six feet in size, surmounted by a steeple and bell. It has 
one end gallery and the internal arrangement is convenient and 
judicious. The cost of the church was about twelve hundred 
dollars. 

Having been instructed for some time in the Catechism, on the 
24th of October, 1847, the following persons were confii-med : 

Miss Catharine Leiby, Miss Margaret Fickes, 

" Catharine Smith, " Lavina Smith, 

'' Leah Smith, Mrs. Mary Troup (baptized). 



CHAPTER II. 161 

Having served the congregation as pastor about three years and 
a half, Rev. Knight resigned in June, 1849, and was succeeded, 
on the 1st of July following, by the 

Rev. Jacob Martm, 

who served this congregation in connection with Bloomfield, 
preaching here regularly once every three weeks. In a letter, 
Rev. Martin says : " During my pastorship of the Bloomfield 
charge, I confirmed between 125 and 150 persons. Their names 
and the time when they were confirmed, I am not able to give." 
The congregation had as yet no church-record book. After con- 
siderable inquiry we found that on the 20th of April, 1851, the 
following persons were confirmed : 

Jacob A. Wolf, Michael Smith, 

Martin Ziegler, Christian Martin, 

Jacob E. Ziegler, Andrew Moses, 

Daniel Reider, Miss Rebecca E. Loy, 
Robert Taylor, " Barbara Super, 

Frederick B. Kohler, " Margaret Leiby, 

William Wilson, " Julian Smith, 

Benjamin Wilson, " Barbara Smith, 

Henry Asper, " Margaret Horting, 

Stephen B. Holly, " Elizabeth Horting, 

Christian Long, Jr., Mrs. Mary Ann Smith, 
Charles Grubb, " 'Susan Martin, 

Isaac Grubb, " Eliz. Holly, by certificate. 

Having collected and instructed another class of catechumens, 
on the 26th of October, 1851, Rev. Martin confirmed the follow- 
ing persons : 

Mrs. Harriet Tate, Miss Caroline Loy, 
" Rebecca Crist, " Barbara Asper, 

" Mary E. Ziegler (baptized), " Mary Eliz. Ziegler, 
" Rachel E. Heims " " Catharine Yohn, 

Miss Mary Ann Wolf " " Eve Bowers. 

14* 



162 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

At this place the pastoral labors of Rev. Martin were signally 
blessed by the Lord. Through his instrumentality many souls 
were made savingly acquainted with Jesus as their Savior, and 
with gratitude to God they dwell on the name of their former pas- 
tor. To the sincere regret of this congregation, Rev. Martin re- 
signed on the 1st of April, 1852, having served it about two years 
and nine months. The 

Rev. William Gerhnrdt 

took charge of the congregation in June of the same year, and 
served it in connection with Bloomfield. He preached here once 
every three weeks, alternately in the forenoon and afternoon. A 
church-record book was now bought, and hereafter entries were 
regularly made of baptisms, confirmations, deaths, &c. 

On the 26th of September, 1852, Mr. George M. I\Iiller and 
his wife Catharine, and in March, 1853, Mr. Francis M. Mickey 
and his wife Elizabeth, and Mr. George Mickey and his wife 
Mary, were received by certificate as members of this congregation. 
After having been faithfully instructed in the doctrines of our 
holy religion, on the 22d of April, 1858, the following persons 
were confirmed : 

Jacob M. Miller, Miss Catharine Clouser, 

Henry Miller, " Sarah Ann Horting, 

Miss Ann Jane Wilson, " Rebecca Cath. Horting. 

Having served the charge about one year. Rev. Gerhardt re- 
signed in June, 1853. The charge was now vacant about eight 
months. A call was then extended to -the 

Rev. Adam Height, 

and accepted by him. He entered on his pastoral labors in the 
charge on the 1st of March, 1854. Here he preached once every 
three weeks. He instructed also a class of catechumens ; but be- 
fore they were confirmed, and for reasons not necessary to record 
here, having preached for about seven months, in September, 
1854, he ceased his ministry. 

The congregation then requested Rev. J. Martin to confirm the 



CHAPTER II. 163 

persons who had been instructed by Mr. Height. With this re- 
quest Rev. Martin complied, and on the 10th of December, 1854, 
the following persons were confirmed : 

Harrison A. Kepner, Miss Mary Jane Kepner, 

George M. Miller, " Catharine A. Smith, 

John Fleisher, " Elizabeth Super. 

At the same time Eev. Martin held the communion, and 
preached a series of sermons for the congregation. The charge 
was again vacant about eight months. Having accepted a call 
from the Bloomfield charge, the 

Rev. David H. Focht 
commenced his pastoral labors in the charge on the 1st of June, 
1855, and preached his introductory sermon at Newport on the 
10th of June, from Col. 1 : 28. 

A protracted meeting was commenced here on the 22d of Janu- 
ary, 1856, and closed on the evening of the 81st of the same 
month. During this time some thirty pei'sons professed to have 
found peace to their souls by the exercise of repentance towards 
God, and faith in the Lord Jesus Christ. Of these, some were 
members of the Church, some belonged to other denominations, 
and some were catechumens. Every day the catechumens and 
anxious persons were met for prayer and instruction, and every 
evening there was preaching. To God be given all the praise and 
glory for this display of his abounding and saving grace ! 

On the 6th of March, 1856, Mr. George Dunbar was admitted 
to membership by baptism, and as the result of the above meet- 
ing, on the 19th of April following, Mrs. Mary Ann Smith and 
Mrs. Sarah Tinney were received by certificate, and the following 
persons were confirmed : 

John Horting, Miss Julian Zigler (baptized), 

George A. Smith, " Margaret Jane Zinn, 

Peter Brown (baptized), '' Maria Hunter, 

Mrs. Magdalene Horting, " Mary Jane Asper, 

" Martha Ann Armstrong, " Araeline Hertzel, 
Miss Mary Jane Zigler (baptized), " Ann Clouser. 



164 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

Soon after his baptism, G-eorge Dunbar fell asleep in the arms 
of death in the sure hope of heaven. 

" Great God I on what a slender thread 
Hang everlasting things ! 
Th' eternal states of all the dead 
Upon life's feeble strings." 

On the 15th of November, 1856, Miss Sophia Singer was re- 
ceived by certificate, and the following persons were confirmed : 

J. Don L. Gantt, Esq. (baptized), Miss Martha Clouser. 
Miss Amanda Jane Wolf, 

One of the above young females has since gone to her grave. 
May the rest be also ready to depart ! 

" Peaceful be thy silent slumber — 
Peaceful in the grave so low : 
Thou no more wilt join our number ; 
Thou no more our songs shalt know." 

On Saturday, the 2d of May, 1857, Mrs. Isabella Musser was 
received by certificate as a member, and the following persons were 
confirmed : 

Abraham K. Long (baptized), Miss Ann Maria Smith, 

Daniel L. Zigler " " Martha Jane Smith. 

Jacob Super, 

Since their confirmation, the last named of the above class has 
been removed from time to eternity. 

" 'Tis well when Jesus calls, 
From earth and sin, arise, 
Join with the hosts of virgin souls. 
Made to salvation wise." 

On Saturday, the 7th of November, 1857, after having been 
instructed in the Catechism in the doctrines of our Christian reli- 
gion, the following persons were confirmed : 

Jacob Fleisher, Miss Margaret R. Smith, 

Miss Catharine Fleisher, Mrs. Jennie D. Smith. 

" Mary Smith, 



CHAPTER II. 165 

"Let thoughtless thousands choose the road 
That leads the soul away from God ; 
This happiness, dear Lord, be mine, 
To live and die entirely thine." 

On tte 24th of April, 1858, Mrs. Mary Harman, and on the 
26th of March, 1859, Mrs. Sarah Crist, were received by certifi- 
cate. At the latter date, Mrs. Martha Ann Wilson was received 
as a member by the sacrament of baptism. May the great Head 
of the Church richly bless these members ! 

In the fall of 1859, an unusual degree of religious interest was 
clearly seen among the people of God in particular, and in the 
community at Newport in general. A class of catechumens was 
formed and instructed for some time. A meeting was held in De- 
cember, when many souls were awakened, and, as we humbly 
trust, truly converted to God. On Saturday, the 10th of De- 
cember, 1859, Mr. Joseph Anderson was received by certificate, 
and the following persons were confirmed : 

Peter K. Lehr, Miss Joanna Hunter, 

Benjamin F. Clouser, " Eliz. Jane Smith, 

James Smith, " Margaret Smith. 
Miss Nancy Clouser, 

" Stand fast upon the solid rock 

Of the Redeemer's righteousness : 
Adorn the Gospel with your lives, 
And practice what your lips profess." 

Immediately after the above persons were confirmed, a large 
number of others were found willing to attend the lectures of the 
pastor on the Catechism. They were regularly instructed. The 
awakening deepened and extended until it became quite general. 
Never, perhaps, was there such a wide-spread and genuine work 
of divine grace at Newport before. In February, 1861, a meet- 
ing was commenced, which lasted about two weeks. On this oc- 
casion the pastor was some time assisted by the Kev. P. M. Ptight- 
myer. Many souls were awakened by the truth, and directed to 
Jesus as their only Savior from sin and death eternal. We would 
do violence to the truth, and the sincere promptings of our own 



166 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

heart, were we not to refer in this way to a work so precious and 
gracious, so full of glory and power divine, and long may we praise 
and bless the Lord for a favor so distinguished and full of love and 
mercy to poor sinners ! We will not attempt to describe the awfully 
solemn, deep, and moving scene. The sigh of the penitent, the 
tears of sorrow and joy, the melting prayer, and the sweet song of 
praise to God, — all, all tended to make it a holy place and good 
to be there. To God alone belongs and be given all the honor 
and glory ! 

On Saturday, the 3d of March, 1860, Mr. Philip Zigler and 
his wife Ann Eliza were received by certificate, and the following 
persons by baptism and confirmation : 

John Wertz, Miss Eliz. Harper (baptized), 

George W. Wolf, " Julian Horting, '' 

George Wilson, " Sarah J. Horting, " 

John H. Horting, " Adaline Horting, " 

Amos K. Smith, " Mary Jane Smith, 

Edward H. Mehrle, " Mary Jane Horting, 

Henry Fleisher, " Emeline Horting, 

George W. Eckard, ^' Elizabeth Kraft, 

Joshua Sweger, " Sarah Kraft, 

Samuel Fravel, " Levina Hunter, 

Nathan Newkirk (baptized), " Rachel Hunter, 

Miss Sarah Clouser, " " Lydia Ann Super, 

" Lydia Clouser, " " Mary Ann Fleisher, 

" Asenath Clouser, " " Eliza Jane Wertz. 

" Nydia Super, " 

" Here I raise my Ebenezer, 

Hither by thy help I've come, 
And I hope, by thy good pleasure, 
Safely to arrive at home. 

" Jesus sought me when a stranger, 
Wand'ring from the fold of God ; 
He, to save my soul from danger, 
Interpos'd his precious blood." 

On Sunday, the 4th of March, the whole number of members 



CHAPTER II. 167 

•who communed was one hundred and twenty-three ; also sixty- 
three, who were not members of this congregation, communed ; 
thus at this time the whole number of communicants was one 
hundred and eighty-six. On account of sickness and other causes, 
about ten members were absent. 

On the 10th of November, 1860, Mrs. Martha MahafFey.and 
Thomas and Alexander Mahaffey were, by certificate, received 
as members of this congregation, which numbers at this time 
(1862) about one hundred and thirty-five members. During the 
seven years the present pastor has had this congregation in charge, 
seventy-nine members were added to it by confirmation and certi- 
ficate. 

There is connected Avith the congregation a well-conducted and 
flourishing Sunday-school. The weekly prayer-meeting is regu- 
larly kept up, and is generally well attended. The members gene- 
rally supply themselves with the literature of the Church, and 
their piety is consistent and intelligent. Their annual contribu- 
tions to the various causes of benevolence in the Church are libe- 
ral, owing, doubtless, to their knowledge of the wants of the 
Church, derived from the reading of the Lutheran Observer. 

Owing to the largeness of the charge, no pastor has been able 
to preach here often er than once every three weeks. This is to be 
regretted very much. The congregation ought to have preaching 
at least once every two weeks, and if possible every Sabbath. We 
sincerely hope that, before long, some arrangements will be made 
to secure this much-needed and desired end. 

On the 22d of March, 1862, Mrs. Elizabeth Wilson and Mrs. 
Jemima Fleisher were received as members by certificate, and at 
the same time Peter Wolf, his wife Susan (baptized). Miss Le- 
vina Huggins, and Miss Mary Ann Ackley were received by con- 
firmation. Dear friends, be faithful to the end, and you shall 
receive the crown of life. 

Since the organization of the congregation on the 14th of Ja- 
nuary, 1844, the following brethren have at different times served 
as its officers : 



168 



CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 



Elder 



Daniel Reider, Sr., 


from Jan 


1844 to 1846. 


Benjamin Horting, 


a 


1846 to 1855. 


John Wilson, 


a 


1855 yet in office. 


Jacob A. Wolf, . 


Deacons. 


1857 


Godfrey Lenig, 


from Jan 


. 1844 to 1846. 


Henry D. Smith, . 


a a 


1844 to 1846. 


John Wilson, 


u 


1846 to 1849. 


Jacob C. Smith, 


li 


1846 to 1849. 


Michael Smith, 


li 


1849 to 1852. 


Abraham Horting, 


" 


1849 to 1857. 


Henry D. Smith, 


a 


1852 to 1857. 


Stephen B. Holly, 


u 


1857 to 1858. 


Michael Smith, 


it 


1857 to 1859. 


Henry L. Smith, 


u 


1857 to 1860. 


George Fleisher, 


u 


1858 to 1861. 


John Horting, 


li 


1859 yet in office. 


Peter Brown, 


ii 


1860 


John Fleisher, 


li 

Trustees. 


1861 « 


Jacob Loy, . 


from 


1845 to 1857. 


Christian Long, Sr. 


Treasurers. 


1857 yet in office. 


Daniel Reider, 


from 


1857 to 1861. 


Christian Long, Sr. 


(I 


1861 yet in office. 



CHAPTER II. 



SECTION V. 

LUTHERAN COKGREGATION AT MANSVILLE, CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 

Mansville is a small village of recent origin, in Centre Town- 
ship, about six miles west of Bloomfield, on the main road lead- 
ing from Bloomfield to lokesburg. At and in the vicinity of 
Mansville a number of Lutheran families settled at the close of 
the last century and the beginning of the present, and their 
number has been gradually increasing ever since. They at- 
tended preaching at that time at Loysville and Bloomfield ; after- 
wards some attended at St. Andrew's (Shuman's), and still later 
some went to St. John's (Bealor's), some to Ludolph's (Germany), 
and others continued their membership at Bloomfield. But as 
they had far to go to any and all of these places, they remained 
scattered and in some measure destitute of the means of grace. 
Some of the more aged members and heads of families were 
clearly convinced of the necessity of preaching in their midst, 
not only for the sake of convenience, but especially for the 
sake of the rising generation. Hence, some of the members re- 
quested the 

Rev. D. H. Focht, 

pastor of the Bloomfield charge, to visit them, and at his conve- 
nience preach an occasional sermon for them. With his consent 
an appointment was accordingly announced, and he preached for 
the first time at what is generally known as MarheVs School- 
house (not the new, but the old school-house, now used as a pri- 
vate dwelling), about one mile southeast of Mansville, on Satur- 
day evening, the 19th of January, 1856, in the German and 
English languages, from Rev. 3 : 20. The attendance and atten- 
tion were encouraging. Another appointment was made, and he 
preached the second time at the same place on Sunday afternoon, 
the 3d of February, from Matt. 6 : 33. After this, he preached 
regularly at this place once every three weeks on Sunday afternoon 
15 



170 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

till June following, when the congregation was regularly organized 
in the new school-house shortly before erected at Mansville. 

Much encouraged by these pastoral visits, and desirous to be 
regularly organized in a congregation in order to secure the stated 
preaching of the Gospel, the members appointed Messrs. John 
A. Fisher and George W. Swartz a committee to meet the differ- 
ent church-councils of the Bloomfield charge, at their Annual 
Convention at Bloomfield, on Saturday, the 26th of April, 1856, 
to request of said church-councils to be received in connection 
with said charge as soon as the Mansville congregation should be 
organized. At the above time those two brethren met the 
church-councils in convention, when they made their request. 
After considerable consultation on motion, it was unanimously 

" Resolved, That the Lutheran congregation, soon to be orga- 
nized at Mansville, be admitted as part of the Bloomfield charge, 
and that our pastor may preach there whenever and as often as 
he finds it convenient and has ability to do so; Provided, how- 
ever, that such arrangement does not interfere with our regular 
appointments." 

In accordance with this resolution, the pastor of the Bloomfield 
charge agreed to preach for the congregation at Mansville, after 
its organization on the 7th of June following. He engaged to 
preach for the congregation once every three weeks, his pastoral 
year to commence on the 1st of June. 

On Saturday, the 7th of June, 1856, at 2 o'clock, p.m., the 
congregation assembled at Mansville at the new school-house, 
built and owned by Mr. John Bowers, when and where the pastor 
preached a sermon from Matt. 28 : 19, 20. After the sermon 
was delivered, the following declaration was read and subscribed 
by the members : 

" We, the undersigned, now regular members of good standing 
in the different neighboring Lutheran congregations, living at and 
in the vicinity of Mansville, Centre Township, Perry County, 
Pennsylvania, feeling deeply the necessity of having the Gospel 
of our Lord Jesus Christ preached statedly among us, of having 
our children instructed in the doctrines of the Christian religion 



CHAPTER II. 171 

and brought into fellowship with the Church of Christ, and of 
having the sacraments administered according to the word of 
God, — and further, having obtained the permission of the Bloom- 
field charge to organize ourselves into a congregation, and having 
been admitted as part of said charge, do, on this day, being Sa- 
turday, the 7th of June, Anno Domini 1856, in reliance on the 
great Head of the Church, organize ourselves into an Evangelical 
Lutheran covgregatlon by electing an Elder or Elders and Dea- 
cons, by adopting the Formula of the General Synod of the Lu- 
theran Church in the United States as the rule for our govern- 
ment and discipline, taking the Bible as our only infallible rule 
of faith and practice, and adhering to the fundamental doctrines 
of the word of God as they are set forth substantially correct in 
the Augsburg Confession, and held and taught by the General 
Synod of the Lutheran Church in the United States. All this 
we do with a view to the glory of the Triune God, Father, Son, 
and Holy Ghost, for our present and eternal good, the good of our 
children and that of the community at large. Looking to Al- 
mighty God for his blessing on this our humble and sincere un- 
dertaking, we hereunto subscribe our names as members of Mans- 
ville Evangelical Lutheran congregation, praying God that his 
word may among us have free course, run, and be glorified in the 
conversion and final salvation of many souls, and that this congre- 
gation may prove a great blessing to many and be perpetuated 
from generation to generation till time shall be no more, through 
Jesus Christ. Amen." 

Signed by 

Daniel Swartz, Sen., Barbara Burkepile, 

John Bowers, Catharine Burkepile, 

John A. Fisher, Sarah Burd, 

Jonas Lenig, Jacob Burkepile, 

John Burrel, Margaret Bowers, 

David Swartz, Elizabeth Wentz, 

John Leppert, Dr. Paulus Reccius, 

Henry Burkepile, Mary Swartz, 



172 



CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 



JMary Ann Swartz, 
Maria Boyd, 
Adam Cless, 
Sophia Cless, 
Catharine Lcppert, 
Catharine Reisdorflf, 
Jacob Burd, 
Catharine MahaflSe, 
George Burkepile, 
Ann Burkepile, 
Margaret Smith, 
Mary Bitner. 



John Cless, 

Hannah Burkepile, 

John Bupp, 

John Sweger, 

George Jacobs, 

Sarah Cless, 

George W. Swartz, 

Sophia Swartz, 

Elizabeth Bowers, 

Catharine Fisher, 

Mary Swartz, 

Catharine Carl, 

Catharine Burrel, 
The congregation proceeded then to elect officers. The follow- 
ing brethren were elected and installed on the same day, viz. : 
Daniel Swartz, Sen, Elder. 
John A. Fisher, for 1 year, ^ ^^^^^^^^ 
Jonas Lenig, for 2 years, J 
Thus the congregation was regularly organized and constituted. 
May the Lord prosper it ! This (Saturday) evening the pastor 
preached fi'oni Mark 5 : 20. On Sunday, the 8th, at 2 o'clock, 
P.M., he preached from Exod. 33 : 14, and baptized five infants. 
After the sermon was preached, the young people, and all others 
who could attend, were catechized about an hour. A class of 
catechumens was formed immediately and instructed carefully for 
about three months. The week previous to their confirmation the 
pastor instructed them daily and preached in the evening. Found 
possessed of the requisite doctrinal and spiritual attainments, by 
a vote of the church-council, on the 30th of August, 1856, the 
pastor confirmed the following persons : 



Jacob Stump, 

Daniel Swartz, Jr., 

Mrs. Sarah Cless (baptized), 

'' Margaret Stump, 

" Matilda Jacobs, 
Miss Sarah Cless, 



Miss Sophia Swartz, 
" Sarah Burrel, 
" Harriet N. Simonton, 
" Catharine Cless, 
" Catharine Reisdorff. 



CHAPTER II. Kd 

" guide our doubtful feet aright, 
And keep us in thy ways ; 
And while we turn our tows to pray'rs, 
Turn thou our pray'rs to praise." 

On Sunday, tte 31st, the Lord's Supper was administered here 
for the first time. The whole number of communicants was fifty- 
three. The Rev. Conrad Kuhl, then agent for the Illinois State 
University, assisted the pastor on this interesting occasion. 

Only an occasional sermon in the German language is required 
by this congregation. In a year or- two none will be needed in 
that language. In the spring of 1857, the congregation com- 
menced a Sunday-school, which has since been kept in regular 
and successful operation. A weekly prayer-meeting was also 
started, which has thus far been well attended, and is conducted 
by the ofl&cers of the congregation. 

In January, 1858, the pastor commenced instructing another 
class of catechumens. After a large number of families had been 
visited and prayed with, it was considered proper to hold a pro- 
tracted meeting. The best account we can give of the progress 
of this meeting will be by transcribing from the church-record 
book the daily entries made at the time, as follows : 

" Commenced a protracted meeting at the school-house at 
Mansville, on Monday evening, the 8th of February, 1858, and 
closed the meeting on Wednesday evening, the 17th of the same 
month. During this time the pastor preached nine sermons, 
catechized, instructed the anxious, and prayed with fifteen fami- 
lies, viz. : 

" February 8th, Monday evening, preached from Rev. 3 : 20. 
There were Jive anxious inquirers. Directed them to Christ. 

"Feb. 9th, Tuesday, visited and prayed with six families. 
Preached this evening from Matt. 1 : 21. Ten persons requested 
to be remembered in the prayers of God's people. They were 
instructed and prayed for. 

" Feb. 10th, Wednesday, visited, instructed and prayed with 
three families. Catechized at 2 o'clock, p.m., and had anxious 
15* 



174 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

meeting. This evening preached from Isa. 55 : 6. Eleven persons 
asked, ' What must we do to be saved ?' 

" Feb. 1 1th, Thursday, the pastor had to be absent. The 
officers and leading members conducted the meeting this evening. 
Twelve awakened souls sought forgiveness by the exercise of re- 
pentance and faith in Jesus Christ. 

" Feb. 12th, Friday evening, preached from Luke 13 : 1-9. 
Thirteen persons were desirous to be prayed for by the people of 
God and to be directed in the way to peace and life. They were 
prayed for and directed to Jesus as the only way. 

" Feb. 13th, Saturday, visited, prayed with and instructed /owr 
families. At 2 o'clock, p.m., had catechization and anxious meet- 
ing. This evening preached from Luke 15 : 18. Eleven awak- 
ened souls asked for instruction and to be remembered in the 
prayers of God's children. The desired instruction was given and 
the prayers were offered. 

" Feb. 14th, Sunday evening, preached from Jer. 6 : 16. Seven 
persons were led to see their lost condition, and cried out, 'What 
must we do ?' They were directed to ' the Lamb of God, which 
taketh away the sin of the world.' 

"Feb. 15th, Monday evening, preached from 1 Kings 18 : 21. 
Six souls, convinced of sin, sought pardon in Jesus' blood. 

'' Feb. 16th, Tuesday evening, preached from Exod. 32 : 26. 
Three or four persons were awakened and sought peace. 

" Feb. 17th, Wednesday, visited and prayed with two families. 
At 2 o'clock, P.M., catechized and had anxious meeting. This 
evening preached from Jer. 8 : 20. There were three seeking 
souls. The meeting closed. 

" As God alone knows the heart of man, so he alone knows the 
number of those who were truly converted to him during the con- 
tinuance of this meeting. Time will clearly show the real results 
of this protracted effort. May all prove faithful to the end ! To 
God belongs all praise and glory for the good accomplished at this 
meeting. May he continue to pour out his Holy Spirit abun- 
dantly, revive his people, confirm the wavering, convert sinners 



CHAPTER II. 175 

to himself, and get to himself a great name among this people, for 
Jesus' sake. Amen." 

Those who professed a change of heart were then for a time 
instructed and established in the doctrines of our holy religion, 
and after being examined by the Church-Council and by vote of 
the same, on Saturday the 10th of April, 1858, the following 
persons were confirmed : 

Peter Smith, Mrs. Mary Ann Swartz, 
Abraham Wentz, " Ellen Ann Lenig, 

Joseph Herth, " Mary Ann Burkepile, 

George Burkepile, Miss Martha Berkley (baptized), 
Jacob Burkepile, " Catharine Turnbaugh, 

George Burrel, '' Barbara Ann Burkepile, 

Mrs. Isabella Herth, " Mary Burkepile. 

One of the above, Mrs. Mary Ann Swartz, has since gone to 
her rest. May all be ready to depart at any time ! 

' ' From day to day, may they grow 
In faith, in hope, and love, 
And walk in holiness below 
To holiness above." 

On Sunday, the 11th, the Lord's Supper was administered to 
seventy-three communicants, of whom fifty-six were members of 
this congregation. On account of sickness and other causes, six 
members were absent. May the Lord bless this people graciously 
and among them establish His kingdom gloriously ! 

On Saturday, the 18th of December, 1858, Mr. Daniel Shoe- 
maker and his wife Sarah, and Mr. Jeremiah Burkepile and his 
wife Mary, were received as members of this congregation, and 
the following persons were confirmed : 

William Bitner, Miss Marg. Ellen Reisdorif. 

Miss Mary Ann Reisdorfi^, 

" Draw us, Savior, with thy grace, 
And lift our thoughts on high. 
That we may end this mortal race, 
And see salvation nio-h." 



176 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

On the 26th of November, 1859, Mr. Christopher Fisher and 
his wife Hetta, and Mr. Gustavus Bolze and his wife Sarah, were 
received as members of this congregation. May they prove 
faithful as good soldiers of Christ. 

On the 31st of March, 1860, Mr. John M. Smith and his wife 
Mary Ann, and Miss Mary A. Zollenberger, and, on the 17th No- 
vember of the same year, Mrs. Rachel Mogel, were received as 
members of Mansville Lutheran congregation. May these persons 
enjoy God's blessing and be useful in their present church re- 
lation. 

The school-house in which the congregation has hitherto 
worshipped is too small to accommodate all who attend preaching 
here, and is in many respects ill adapted as a house of worship. 
Hence, the need of a suitable church-edifice has for some time 
been deeply felt. A meeting was therefore called to take into 
consideration the propriety of erecting a church. The proceed- 
ings of this convention read as follows : 

'' In accordance with previous announcement, the following 
brethren, viz., Daniel Swartz, Sen., John A. Fisher, David Swartz, 
George W. Swartz, Henry Burkepile, John Leppert, Jeremiah 
Burkepile, Adam Cless, George Burkepile, Peter Smith, John 
Bupp, and Jacob Burkepile, met at Mansville on the 19th of No- 
vember, 1860, to make arrangements for the building of a church. 
The pastor called the convention to order, the 499th hymn in 
our Hymn-Book was sung, and then he led the brethren in prayer 
to God for the guidance of the Holy Spirit and the blessing of 
heaven on the proposed enterprise. The object of the convention 
was then clearly and fully stated. After mature consideration 
the following resolutions were unanimously adopted : 

" Resolved, 1. That in reliance on the aid and blessing of God 
and for the promotion of His glory we will build a church. 

" Resolved, 2. That the church be called Mansville Evangelical 
Lutheran Church. 

^^ Resolved, 3, That the church be erected at Mansville on the 
corner lot, which Mr. Daniel Swartz, Sen., offers for the purpose. 

" Resolved, 4. That the church-edifice be thirty-five by forty 



CHAPTER II. 177 

feet in size, framS; and plastered inside and plastered and pebble- 
dashed outside. 

" Resolved, 5. That a building committee of three be appointed, 
and that Daniel Swartz, Sen., Henry Burkepile, and George W. 
Swartz be said committee, and John A. Fisher be Treasurer. 

" Resolved, 6. That the building committee see to it that the 
above church-edifice be erected in a manner as good and yet as 
cheap as possible, and superintend its erection." 

After the passage and adoption of the above resolutions as a 
whole, the following heading of a subscription was drawn up, and 
upwards of two hundred and fifty dollars were subscribed : 

'' We, the undersigned subscribers, promise to pay in money, 
labor or materials, the respective sums opposite our names towards 
the erection of 3Iansville Evangelical Lutheran Church at Mans- 
ville. Centre Township, Perry County, Pa. Said church to be 
used for the preaching of the Gospel of Jesus Christ in purity, 
and by the unanimous consent of the whole Church-Council other 
orthodox denominations may be allowed to preach in it a funeral 
sermon or an occasional sermon; Provided, such occasional 
sermon does not cause disturbance or interfere with the appoint- 
ments of the church. November 19th, 1860." 

The convention then adjourned with prayer by the pastor. 
The brethren, also, at the same time selected a suitable spot of 
ground for a graveyard on Mr. Daniel Swartz's land, about half a 
mile west of Mansville. Thus initial steps were taken towards 
the accomplishment of a much-needed and glorious end, — the 
erection of a house of worship. 

From the deed of conveyance we will add the following extracts : 

" This Indenture, made the 26th day of July, 1861, between 
Daniel Swartz, of Centre Township, Perry County, and State of 
Pennsylvania, and Sophia his wife, of the first part, and Daniel 
Swartz, George Swartz and John Leppert, Trustees of the Luthe- 
ran congregation and church, worshipping and located at Mans- 
ville (otherwise called Phoenixville) in said township, and their 
successors in ofl&ce, of the second part — Witnesseih, that the said 
Daniel Swartz and wife, for and in consideration of the sum of 



178 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

one dollar to them in hand paid by the said Trustees, &c., ... do 
give, grant, bargain, sell, . . . unto the said Daniel Swartz, George 
Swartz and John Leppert, Trustees as aforesaid, and their succes- 
sors in office, in trust for the Lutheran Church located as afore- 
said, to be used for the preaching of the Gospel of Jesus Christ 
in purity, from time to time, to the congregation worshipping in 
said church according to the discipline and usages of the said 
church ; but by obtaining the unanimous consent of the whole 
Church-Council, other orthodox denominations may be allowed to 
preach a funeral or other occasional sermon in it; Provided, that 
such occasional sermon does not cause difficulty or interfere with the 
appointments of the said Lutheran congregation, . . . the follow- 
ing described pieces or lots of land bounded as follows and situated 
in Township, County, and State aforesaid, to wit : The first lot 
beginning at corner, &c., . . . containing twenty perches neat mea- 
sure. The other lot, situate as aforesaid, bounded as follows : be- 
ginning in road leading from Mansville, &c., . . . containing twenty 
perches strict measure, which latter lot is to be for the use of the 
church aforesaid for burying ground or graveyard to bury their 
dead. The two above described lots of ground sold, &c., . . . unto 
the said Daniel Swartz, George Swartz, and John Leppert, Trus- 
tees as aforesaid, and their successors in ofi&ce, in trust, and for the 
use of the Lutheran church aforesaid, to the only proper use and 
behoof of the Trustees for the use aforesaid, and their successors 
in office forever," &c. See Deed-Book T., vol. i, p. 394. 

The lumber and other material for the new church-edifice is 
nearly all taken out; but the war in which our country is involved 
induced the members to defer erecting the building until more 
auspicious times shall returri. It is however thought that in the 
fall of 1862 and the beginning of '63, the edifice can be put up 
and completed. It is very much needed, and we trust it will in 
the course of a year be erected. 

On the 24th of March, 1861, Miss Sarah Turnbaugh was re- 
ceived as a member by confirmation. May she follow Jesus truly 
till the end ! 

On Saturday the 9th of November, 1861, after being instructed 



CHAPTER IT. 



179 



for some time, the following persons were admitted to membership 
by the rite of confirmation : 

John Long, Miss A. C Barnes (baptized), 

David Swartz, " Esther Burkepile, 

Wni. Leinewever (baptized), " Sarah Sweger. 

" So let our lips and lives express 
The holy Gospel we profess ; 
So let our works and virtues shine, 
To prove the doctrine all divine ! 

" Thus shall we best proclaim abroad 
The honors of our Savior God, 
When the salvation reigns within, 
And grace subdues the pow'r of sin." 

Little Charles Stump, who died on the 17th of November, 1861, 
aged 1 year, 5 months, and 13 days, was the first one buried in 
the new graveyard belonging to the congregation at Mansville. 

At this time (June, 1862) the congregation numbers sixty- 
eight members. Since the organization of the congregation, six 
years ago, forty-six members have been added by confirmation and 
certificate, six have departed this life, and thirteen have removed, 
and fifty-two infants were baptized. What is now most wanted 
is the church-edifice. 

Since the organization of the congregation in June, 1856, the 
followinc: brethren have at diff"erent times served as its oflBcers : 



Daniel Swartz, Sen., 



Elder. 

from June, 1856 yet in office. 



Deacont 



John A. Fisher, . 
Jonas Lenig, 
George W. Swartz 
David Swartz, 
John A. Fisher, . 
John Bupp, 
John M. Smith, . 



from June, 1856 to 1857. 

" 1856 to 1858. 

" 1857 to 1859. 

" 1858 to 1860. 

" 1859 to 1861. 

" 1860 yet in office. 

a 13(51 u 



180 CHURCHES BETAVEEN THE MOUNTAINS, 

Trustees. 

Daniel Swartz, Sen., . from July, 1861 yet in office. 

George W. Swartz, . " '« 1861 " 

John Leppert, . . '' " 1861 " 

Treasurer. 
Jolin A. Fisher, . . from June, 1856 yet in office. 

REMARKS RESPECTING THE BLOOMFIELD CHARGE. 

1. Since the 26th of January, 1862, the pastor of the charge 
has been preaching regularly once every three weeks, in the after- 
noon, at a school-house in Miller Township, about five miles east 
of Bloomfield, at Dick's Gap and near the old graveyard referred 
to in the introduction to this work (see pp. 15-16). A number 
of members reside in that vicinity. Some other places within the 
bounds of the charge ought also to be brought under spiritual cul- 
tivation ; but the charge is already too large and laborious for one 
man. The pastor cannot do justice to himself nor to his people ; 
the labor required is too great. A number of changes have taken 
place in the charge since the present pastor has had the oversight 
of it. The Buffalo congregation near Ickesburg is now united 
with Blain, and the Mansville congregation has been organized 
and united with the charge ; the Centre Lutheran congregation 
was organized, a church was built, and in November, 1861, was 
united with the Millerstown Mission. Thus two congregations 
were added to the charge, and two were yielded to other charges. 
There are at present in the charge upwards of six hundred mem- 
bers, who are scattered over a territory of about twenty miles from 
east to west, and of about fifteen from north to south. It is hoped 
a division of the charge will in some way be effected before long. 
It is not the largest number of members that always supports the 
Gospel best. A small farm cultivated well will yield more than a 
large one cultivated indifferently. We must have smaller charges, 
if our pastors are to get old and our people are to be properly 
trained and truly benefited spiritually. 



CHAPTER II. 181 

2. During the seven years (from the 1st of June, 1855, to the 
1st of June, 1862,) that the present pastor has had charge of the 
Bloomfield pastorate, in the various changes that have taken place 
in it, two congregations were organized ; two new Lutheran 
churches were built, and the third is in course of erection ; three 
hundred and thirty-eight persons were added to the membership 
by confirmation and certificate ; three hundred and thirty-seven 
infants were baptized; the pastor preached just thirteen hundred 
times, lectured on the Catechism three hundred and thirty-two 
times, and delivered about four hundred and fifty addresses on 
various occasions ; he attended one hundred and sixteen funerals, 
and solemnized ninety-one marriages. During the same time there 
were sold in the charge sixty dozen Lutheran Hymn-books, thirty 
dozen Catechisms, eighty dozen Lutheran Almanacs, and other 
church literature in proportion. The Lutheran Observer is the 
acknowledged church-paper, and circulates extensively in the 
charge. Weekly prayer-meetings and Sunday-schools in all the 
congregations are established, regularly kept up, and generally 
well attended. For the support of every good cause the members 
contribute liberally, and peace in all the congregations is sacredly 
maintained. The chief and only source of grief to the pastor 
arises from his inability to visit the members more frequently in 
their houses, and to preach oftener to the congregations, owing to 
the great extent of the charge. Much has indeed been done to 
advance the cause of the blessed Redeemer ; more might have 
been done had the charge been smaller. Whilst the pastor would, 
with sincere gratitude to God, record the kindness and sympathy 
of the members he has always experienced, and express his un- 
feigned love for them, he knows, that, as the charge now is, 
labor, severe labor, is required ; so that he may, in view of the 
past and future, justly exclaim : " Who is sufficient for these 
things \" and adopt as his own the language of the hymn : 

1. Jerusalem ! my happy home ! 
Name ever clear to me ! 
When shall my labors have an end, 
In joy and peac» and thee? 



182 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

2. When shall these eyes thy heav'n-built -vralls 

And pearly gates behold ? 
Thy bulwarks with salvation strong, 
And streets of shining gold ? 

3. when, thou city of my God, 

Shall I thy courts ascend. 
Where congregations ne'er break up 
And Sabbaths have no end? 

. 4. There happier bow'rs than Eden's bloom, 
Nor sin nor sorrow know : 
Blest seats I through rude and stormy scenes 
I onward press to you. 

5. Why should I shrink at pain or woe ? 

Or feel at death dismay ? 
I've Canaan's goodly land in view, 
And realms of endless day. 

6. Apostles, martyrs, prophets, there, 

Around my Savior stand ; 
And soon my friends in Christ below 
Will join the glorious band. 

7. Jerusalem ! my happy home ! 

My soul still pants for thee ; 
Then shall my labors have an end, 
When I thy joy shall see. 



CHAPTER III. 183 



CHAPTER III. 

THE BLAIN CHARGE. 

The territory embraced in the Blain cliarge was until lately 
connected with the Loysville pastorate. As the Loysville charge 
was too large for one minister to serve, Rev. P. Willard requested 
that provision should be made for the employment of an assistant. 
Zion congregation at Blain, and St. Paul's in Madison Township, 
proposed such an assistant, and were willing to do their part to- 
wards supporting him ; but for reasons not known to us, the con- 
gregation at Loysville was opposed to the employment of an assist- 
ant, and unwilling to aid in his support. As the Loysville charge 
required more labor than one minister could perform, and as the 
two congregations above named considered themselves fully able 
to support a pastor, they united in the formation of a new charge. 
For this purpose a meeting was called. On the 26th of October, 
1858, the church-councils of Zion and St. Paul's congregations 
met,, and passed the following preamble and resolutions : 

" Whereas the Loysville charge is too large and laborious for 
one minister, and whereas the Loysville congregation refuses to 
employ the assistant named by the other part of the charge — 
therefore — 

" Resolved, That we hereby separate ourselves from the other 
part of the Loysville charge, and form ourselves into a new one, to 
be known by the name of the Blain charge. 

" Resolved, That a copy of the above preamble and resolution 
be sent to the balance of the Loysville charge, and to the Presi- 
dent of Synod of Central Pennsylvania, with the request that he 
publish the same in the Lutheran Observer. 

Signed, " William Brickley, 

"President. 

" George Stroup, 

" Secretary." 



184 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

The Loysville pastorate being now divided into two separate 
charges, Rev. Willard resigned in November, 1858, and thus 
opened the way for each charge to call its own pastor. 



SECTION I. 

ZION CONGREGATION AT BLAIN IN JACKSON TOWNSHIP. 

During the last quarter of the last century, and the beginning 
of the present, a large number of families belonging to the Lu- 
theran Church settled the very fertile and beautiful scope of land 
west of Loysville. Blain, a village in Jackson (formerly Toboyne) 
Township, about ten miles west of Loysville, is located at about 
the centre of this rich, charming, and densely populated part of 
Sherman's Valley. At the close of the last century the members 
in this region enjoyed already occasional preaching by the Rev. 
John Herbst, at different places in private dwellings, school-houses, 
barns, &c. Encouraged by these occasional pastoral visits, and 
with a view to the building of a church and the securing of the 
stated preaching of the Gospel among them, a piece of land was 
bought where Blain was afterwards located. This church-land is 
part of a tract located by Abraham Mitchel as early as 1762, of 
which tract James Adams afterwards sold two acres for church and 
graveyard purposes, as the following extracts from the deed of con- 
veyance show : 

" The Indenture made the 10th day of January, 1801, between 
James Adams of Toboyne Township, Cumberland County, and 
State of Pennsylvania, of the one part, and Christopher Bower, 
Henry Zimmerman, Adam Hubler and Peter Brown of the Town- 
ship, County, and State aforesaid. Trustees for building a German 
meeting-house in said Township, of the other part, — Now this In- 
denture witnesseth that the said James Adams, for and in con- 
sideration of the sum of twenty-five pounds Pennsylvania currency 



CHAPTER iir. 185 

to liim in hand paid by said Christopher Bower, Henry Zimmer- 
man, Adam Hubler and Peter Brown, hath granted, bargained, 
sold, &c., ... a small moiety of land, containing in all two acres 
without any allowance for roads, &c., ... to the aforesaid Trustees 
for the foresaid congregation and their successors in office to said 
congregation or their assigns forever, &c." Vide Deed-Book, Let- 
ter 0., p. 497. 

Though the members had now land whereon to erect a church, 
still they had preaching only occasionally. After Rev. Herbst 
left in 1801, they were visited successively by Rev. Messrs. 
Sanno, Osterloh, and it may be by Oberhauser. Until they had 
a house of worship of their own, the members here went to Loys- 
ville, a distance from eight to fifteen miles, on sacramental occa- 
sions. The young people also attended catechizing at Loysville, 
and were there confirmed. Some time in 1815, the members se- 
cured the pastoral services of the 

Rev. John William Heim, 

who organized the congregation. The first Lutheran Church-Coun- 
cil consisted of the following members : 

John Sieger, I ^, , Abraham Bower, ^ 

Henry Zimmerman, I Solomon Bower, ^ Deacons. 

John Stambach, j 

In the spring of 1816, the congregation sent a petition to Synod, 
requesting that Rev. Heim might be recognized as their pastor. 
This request was granted by Synod. (See page 31.) The scattered 
members were now collected and much encouraged. But the want 
of a suitable house was soon and deeply felt. The members 
were in this section of the valley comparatively numerous, and they 
were not only necessitated, but also able, to build a large church. 
The following is a translation of the heading of a German sub- 
scription circulated for the purpose of obtaining aid towards erect- 
ing the proposed church : 

" In the year 1816. A petition for aid, for the welfare of the 
congregations, to build a joint German Lutheran and German Re- 
16* 



186 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

forQied church in Toboyne Township, Cumberland County. As 
our neighborhood is very inadequately provided with churches for 
the worship of the Triune God, and as we should not be indiffe- 
rent respecting this matter, it is highly necessary that we build a 
house of God, where we can assemble and unitedly engage in 
praising the Lord for his unspeakable goodness and mercy mani- 
fested towards us to this time. It is our prayer and entreaty that 
this proposal to build a church may meet with a hearty response 
and active support, because we should feel it to be our duty to do 
a good work, and because it is a work so highly necessary. It is 
proposed to build the edifice of stone ; and all the church-mem- 
bers are requested to contribute towards its erection, and we would 
also ask our fellow-brethren to help us, so that this good work, 
which we are bound to do, may not remain undone." 

" Accordingly," so says the record, " the commencement of 
this building was made on the 6th of May, in the year 1816." 
The following Constitution, though without date, was without 
doubt written and signed only a short time before the laying of 
the corner-stone, in which a copy of it was deposited. It was 
written in the German language, probably by Rev. Heim, and is 
singularly difficult to decipher. Rev. J. T. Williams says : " I 
confess I never undertook anything so difficult to translate as this 
Constitution. It is bad in orthography, bad in syntax, bad all 
over, I think I have, however, succeeded in giving the sense, 
though I had often to guess it out, for the words and the con- 
struction of the sentences frequently convey no sense." As we 
have been informed, one of the members transcribed the Consti- 
tution into the church-record in a careless manner, and hence no 
doubt the difficulty Rev. Williams experienced in translating it. 
The Constitution reads as follows : 



THIS CHURCH SHALL BE STYLED ZION CHURCH. 
Churchrules. 
The Church-rules of the joint congregations are the following : 
Article 1, The minister preaching in this church shall be of 



CHAPTER III. 187 

good report ; he shall teach according to the Holy Scriptures and 
the Large and Smaller Catechisms,* that is, the doctrines he 
preaches shall be in harmony with the pure Word of Jesus Christ 
and the Lutheran and Reformed confession of faith ; and he shall 
administer the Holy Sacraments, Baptism and the Lord's Supper, 
and lead an upright and godly life. 

Art. 2. The minister and church-council shall see to it that 
order be preserved in the church, and when children are baptized 
that their names be recorded in the church-record. 

Art. 3. In the election of pastor, of schoolmaster, of the 
church-council, and in all matters relating to the church and 
school, the majority of votes shall decide. 

Art. 4. When the congregation is without a pastor, the church- 
council shall then invite a minister to preach a trial sermon, so 
that the congregation may have the opportunity to hear him, and 
thus be enabled to judge whether he is likely to be useful among 
them and will prove to be a good witness in doctrine and life. 

Art. 5. The church-council shall exercise care that the minis- 
ter, who takes charge of this congregation, be and continue sound 
in doctrine and exemplary in life ; if he, however, fail to be so, 
the council shall then notify the congregation of the fact and ad- 
monish the minister, and if he does not reform after having been 
admonished, he shall then be discharged by a majority of votes. 

Art. 6. The Elders and Deacons of this joint Lutheran and 
Reformed congregation shall always be elected by a majority of 
votes, viz. : two Elders for the term of six years and three Dea- 
cons for the term of three years, by each congregation ; the re- 
tiring members of the church-council, if they have been faithful 
in their ofl&ce, may be re-nominated and re-elected. The church- 
council shall lift the collections of the congregation, and once a 
year make settlement of the money collected. 

Art. 7. The land belonging to the church and the graveyard 
shall be the joint property of the two congregations ; the money 

* The Lutheran and Reformed Catechisms are meant, as the "confession 
of the faith" of each congregation. 



188 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

obtained by collections shall belong equally to both congregations, 
and shall be used for the improvement of the church and school- 
house ; the altar-cloth and sacramental service, the keys of the 
church and such like, shall be held and used jointly by both con- 
gregations. 

Art. 8. It shall be the duty of the church-council to take care 
that the land belonging to this Evangelical Lutheran and Reformed 
church and school, together with all the buildings thereon erected 
or that may hereafter be thereon erected, be and continue for all 
time to come the property of this Lutheran and Reformed congre- 
gation. 

Art. 9. The church-council shall, out of love to these congre- 
gations, render their service at divine worship free of charge. 
When, however, a minister or school-teacher is invited from a dis- 
tance, if required, his travelling expenses shall be paid by the 
congregations. 

Art. 10. The pastors shall be elected by their respective con- 
gregations. The Lutherans shall elect their pastor, and the Re- 
formed theirs, and the Lutherans shall support their pastor and 
the Reformed theirs. 

Art. 11. It shall be the duty of the church-council of each 
congregation to exercise diligent care that during the time of di- 
vine worship and school-term good order be maintained. 

Art. 12. The church-council shall see to it that as regards ap- 
pointments for preaching, one minister does not interfere with 
the other. When one minister has announced an appointment for 
divine worship, the other shall then make his appointment eight 
days later, so that all things may be done in peace and order. 

Art. 13. The church-council shall take care that, if two deaths 
occur near the same time, the one that died first be buried first. 
If, however, the friends of the one that died first be not ready to 
bury, they shall then notify the friends of the one that died last, 
and these shall then proceed to bury their dead. If in this 
matter any one should be negligent and cause strife at or in the 
church, men shall then be chosen from each congregation, and 
these men shall settle the case and severely reprimand the guilty. 



CHAPTER III. 



189 



Art. 14. In this church the church-council shall permit no 
person to preach, who has not been examined, found qualified, 
and been licensed by one of the Evangelical Lutheran or Reformed 
Ministeriums to perform the duties of the office of teacher or 
preacher. 

That we will be governed by the above rules, we obligate our- 
selves by affixing our signatures : 



Henry Wentz, 
John Zimmerman, 

Solomon Bower, >, 
Jacob Kroemer, [ 
Jonathan Faust, I 
Jacob Arnold, J 
George Leiby, 
Daniel Wentz, 
Daniel Gutshall, 



Elders. 



Trustees. 



Jacob Wentz, "x 

John Berkir, v Deacons. 

Jacob Shuman, ) 

Hen. Zimmerman, >> 

John Garber, i Building 

Henry Wentz, j Committee. 

George Faust, J 

Jonathan Sieger, 
George Stroup, 
David Kern. 



The above " Church-rules" have long since become a dead letter. 
Each congregation now manages its ecclesiastical affairs according 
to the Synod or General Synod of its own Church. 

According to the church-record, " the corner-stone was laid on 
the 23d of May, 1816, being Ascension Day, when Pastor Heim, 
Lutheran minister, preached a suitable discourse from 1 Pet. 
2 : 6-8, which reads as follows : ' Behold, I lay in Zion a chief 
corner-stone, elect, precious : and he that believeth on him shall 
not be confounded. Unto you therefore which believe, he is pre- 
cious : but unto them which be disobedient, the stone which the 
builders disallowed, the same is made the head of the corner, and 
a stone of stumbling, and a rock of offence.' " * 

The church was consecrated in July, 1817, by the name of 



* In his journal, Kev. Heim says : "On the 23d of May, 1816, laid the 
coraer-stone of Zion Church in Sherman's Valley. Preached in the forenoon 
from 1 Pet. 2 : 6-8. Hymn : Meinen Jesuvi lass ich nicht, &c. In the after- 
noon I preached from Rom. 10 : 17. Hymn : Versuchet euch dock selbst, &c. 
Baptized five infants." 



190 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

Zion Church. On this occasion Rev. Heim and Rev. Conrad 
Walter of the Lutheran Churchy Rev. Mr. Helffensteiu of the Re- 
formed Church, and Rev. John Linn of the Presbyterian Church, 
were present and took part in the exercises. 

The church-edifice is of stone, a substantial structure, forty-five 
hyji/fi/ feet in size. It has inside a high gallery on three sides. 
The pulpit is high and ascended by a flight of steps, and over it 
is suspended a sounding-board. The altar, in front of the pulpit, 
is circular, elevated one step from the floor, and wholly surrounded 
by a balustrade. A cupola and bell surmount the church. We 
should suppose the church has capacity to accommodate from six 
to eight hundred persons, and judging from the work expended 
on it, it must have cost from four to five thousand dollars. Withal, 
the internal arrangement is not good. At the time the church 
was erected, it was, however, considered a great church as to size 
and felicitous as to arrangement. 

From 1815 to 1849, Rev. Heim preached here regularly once 
every four weeks, exclusively in the German language. On the 
27th of December, 1849, in his 68th year, the Lord called him 
from his labors in the church militant to his reward in the church 
triumphant, For want of a church-record, we are unable to learn 
who or how many were from time to time admitted to membership 
whilst Rev. Heim was pastor of this congregation. The number 
must have been large, as at present upwards of two hundred and 
fifty members belong, at least nominally, to the Blain congrega- 
tion. The Lord crowned the labors of his servant, here as else- 
where, with great success. After the decease of Father Heim, the 
congregation was vacant about ten months. In November, 1850, 
in connection with the Loysville pastorate, the 

Eev. Frederick Ruthravff 

commenced his ministerial labors here. He introduced the use 
of the English language in preaching, a measure for a long time 
much needed among this people. His pastoral labors were crowned 
with marked success, and under his ministry many were added to 
the Church. Soon after he commenced preaching here, he formed 



CHAPTER III. 



191 



a class of catechumens, whom he instructed in the doctrines of 
religion. Though he has since joined the ransomed in glory, he 
did a good work here, and long hereafter many will dwell on his 
name with delight, filial affection, and sincere gratitude to God. 
He labored diligently ; the words he spoke were those of a father, 
who desires the good of his children ; and in all he did and said 
he pointed to Jesus Christ as the only Savior of the soul. His 
words of love will not be forgotten by those who heard them. The 
large number whom he inducted into the Church will ever be a 
witness to his faithfulness and success as a minister of the Gospel 
of Jesus Christ. On the 18th of April; 1851, the following per- 
sons were confirmed : 



Joseph Wentz, 
Andrew S. Loy, 
John Shuman, 
George Wentz, 
John Ebert, 
Joseph B. Garber, 
William Stambaugh, 
Peter Stahl, 
David McCartel, 
George Ernst, 
Sylvester K. Baltoser, 
David Kissler, 
Henry Gibbons, 
John Shoemaker, 
Samuel Klaus, 
James McCartel, 
John Sheibley, 
Margaret Garber, 
Lucinda Baltoser, 
Elizabeth Baker, 
Caroline Loy, 
Susanna Bower, 
Eliz. Jane Baker, 



Jane Gutshall, 

Magdalene Briner, 

Lydia A. Wentz, 

Jane Shoemaker, 

Mary Gutshall, 

Catharine Phillips, 

Margaret Stroup, 

IMargaret Loy, 

Mary A. Gutshall, 

Mary Kissler, 

Sarah Ernst, 

Mary Schambach, 

Margaret Kissler, 

Catharine Klaus, 

Maria A. Henry, 

Rebecca Henry, 

Elizabeth C. Saltzberg, 

Eliza Ewing, 

Sarah J. Wentz, 

Michael Loy, ^ ^^ ^^^^;g_ 

^^^'y^^J' [ cate. 

Elizabeth Chestnut. ) 



192 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

This year the congregations at Blain obtained another parcel of 
land, as the following extracts from the deed of conveyance show : 

" This Indenture, made the 1st day of November, 1851, be- 
tween Arnold R. Fahs and Julia E. his wife, of Jackson Town- 
ship, Perry County, and State of Pennsylvania, of the one part, 
and Solomon Bower, Jacob Kremer, David Snyder, and George 
Souder of Jackson and Toboyne Townships, County and State 
aforesaid, Trustees of the congregations at Zion's Church, in Jack- 
son Township, County and State aforesaid, of the other part, Wit- 
nesseth, that the said Arnold E.. Fahs and Julia E. his wife, for 
and in consideration of the sum of five dollars to them in hand 
paid by the party of the second part, . . . have granted, bar- 
gained, sold, &c., . . . one acre neat measure ... to Solomon 
Bower, Jacob Kremer, David Snyder, and George Souder," &c. 
See Deed-Book, Letter 0., p. 498. 

In order to render honor to whom honor is due, it is proper to 
state, respecting this one acre of land, that Alexander F. Toply 
donated three-fourths of an acre of it to the congregations. But 
before making a deed of conveyance, he sold his tract of land 
adjoining the church property to Mr. Fahs, with the understand- 
ing that these three-fourths of an acre were to belong to the con- 
gregations. Mr. Fahs afterwards sold to the congregations one- 
fourth of an acre in addition to the three-fouths Mr. Toply had 
previously donated, and then gave the congregation a deed for one 
acre. The congregations paid Mr. Fahs five dollars for the one- 
fourth acre he sold to them. 

A year had now passed away, and others were found willing to 
attend a series of lectures on the Catechism. The Lord smiled ap- 
provingly on the faithful labors of the pastor. The congregation 
was reviving and prospering. A deep interest on the subject of 
religion was awakened in many hearts. On the 9th of April, 
1852, the following persons were confirmed : 

Samuel Bloom, Elizabeth Beistlein, 

Jacob Briner, Mary E. Brickley, 

John Beistlein, Sarah E. Cless, 



CHAPTER III. 193 

Benjamin Beistlein, Eliza J. Ernst, 

George Holienshilt, Mary Grutshall, 

Daniel Shoemaker, Elizabeth Garber, 

Peter Yohn, Sarah Hohenshilt, 

Thomas Stump, Sarah Yohn, 

Alexander Stump, Sarah Seager, 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Catharine E. Seager, 

George McCartel, Susanna Reinsmith, 

George Holtz, Rebecca Zimmerman, 

Sarah Beistlein, Hannah Zimmerman. 

Having served the congregation as pastor for two years, to the 
great regret of all, Rev. RuthrauflF resigned in November, 1852. 
The charge was then vacant about four months. Having accepted 
a call, the 

Rev. Reuben Weiser 
commenced his pastoral labors in the Loysville charge on the 1st 
of April, 1853. Whilst he was pastor of this congregation some 
twenty persons were confirmed ; but as their names were not re- 
corded, we cannot give them now. Rev. Weiser preached here 
once every three weeks. About one-half of the preaching was 
now required in the English language. Having been pastor of 
the congregation about two years and a half, Rev. Weiser resigned 
in September, 1855. The charge was then vacant about seven 
months. Having received and accepted a call, on the 25th of 
May, 1856, the 

Rev. FhiUp Willard 

entered on the discharge of his pastoral labors here. Rev. Wil- 
lard toiled incessantly in this part of the Lord's vineyard, and here, 
as elsewhere in the charge, uncommon success attended his min- 
istry. Through his instrumentality many were led to Jesus Christ, 
and now give full proof by their life that they are in the way to 
glory. He catechized almost constantly. No sooner was one class 
of catechumens confirmed than he formed and instructed another. 
Much, very much, of his success was owing to his faithfulness in 
the lecture-room. Here it was that the revivals under his minis- 
17 



194 CHURCHES between the mountains. 

try couimenced. Here he was at home. Not by any labored effort, 
not by anything peculiarly eloquent in his sermons (though these 
were always instructive), not by vapid appeals to the feelings of 
his hearers, — no, in none of these ways did he accomplish what 
he did ; but he catechized as one who feels deeply that he must 
appear before God and answer for the manner he dealt with the 
souls committed to his charge. With him, catechization was not 
a dead formality. Truth, the truth as it is in Jesus, with all its 
life and saving energy, its fulness and glory, was clearly set forth, 
illustrated, and enforced with unction from on high and amid 
ardent tears and fervent prayers. The result of, such labors — la- 
bors continued from day to day — we have in the large access of 
members to the Church under his ministry. The mystery of his 
success is easily solved. Would that, in this respect, his example 
were more generally followed 1 In catechizing, as in preaching, 
a man may be slothful and inefficient, and with all his formal and 
heartless, spiritless and Christless catechizing, both he and his 
catechumens may sink to hell ; but, on the contrary, in catechiz- 
ing, as in preaching, a man filled with a due sense of his respon- 
sibility to God and to souls, speaking from the heart to the heart, 
holding forth the whole counsel of God, and directing the sinner 
to Jesus Christ as the only Savior, will be successful in leading 
sinners to Christ, and catechizing will evince itself to be a glorious 
means of good. Much, very much, depends on the manner and 
spirit, the zeal and deep earnestness, the longing of soul and deep 
desire of heart for the conversion and salvation of the catechu- 
mens, in order to success in catechizing. The life and spirit of 
Christ must give life and spirit to the instruction imparted, and 
then the truth will be the power of God and the wisdom of God 
unto salvation. But to proceed with our narrative. In October, 
1856, the following were confirmed : 

Joseph Beistlein, David H. Smith, Jane Bower, 

Samuel Smith, Elizabeth Wentz, Sarah Gutshall, 

Jonathan Beistlein, Catharine Wentz, Caroline Gutshall, 

Jacob Meager, Margaret Wentz, Sarah B. Smith, 



CHAPTER III. 



195 



William Anderson, Mary A. Shearer, Susanna Shatto, 
Solomon Gutshall, Mary A. Ebert, Marg. Hollenbaugh, 
"Wm. B. Gutshall, Arabella Beistlein, Eliza Seager, 
Samuel Gibbons, Leah Beistlein, Malinda J. Seager, 

George Beistlein, Sarah Bower, Nancy Gibbons. 

It may with great propriety be said that this congregation, as 
well as the whole Loysville charge, enjoyed a continual revival 
wlulst Rev. Willard was pastor of it. God poured out his Spirit 
on the people, and their hearts were opened to the truth as it is 
in Jesus, and made them willing to receive it in the love of it. 
The lectures on the Catechism were continued and well attended. 
Everywhere the inquiry was, '^ What shall I do to be saved ?" — 
and the answer always was, "Repent of your sins and believe in 
Jesus Christ." On the 7th of June, 1S57, the following persons 
were confirmed : 



John Brickley, 
Thomas Reeder, 
Daniel Anderson, 
Samuel Kuney, 
Henry Baker, 
Abraham Trostle, 
Catharine Shuman, 



Esther Philips, Matilda Wentz, 

Margaret Gutshall, Sarah Gutshall, 



Elizabeth Loy, Rebecca Shoemaker, 

Mary C. Trostle, Caroline Baltozer, 

Julia A. Bower, Caroline Faust, 

Mary M. Brickley, Margaret Kuney, 

Susan E. Smith, Elizabeth Shuler. 

During the early part of 1858, it pleased the Lord to pour out 
his Spirit copiously upon this congregation. A large number pro- 
fessed to have experienced a change of heart, and the members 
were greatly revived. The lectures on the Catechism were con- 
tinued, and the converts were still more fully instructed. The 
pastor met them for several months once or twice every week, and 
under his teaching their views of the doctrines of our holy religion 
were enlarged, their experience was confirmed, and their duties, 
positive and relative, were made clear. Found willing to unite 
themselves with God's people, on the 25th of April, 1858, the 
following persons were confirmed : 

Christian Streiker, Samuel P. Gutshall, Susanna Shuman, 
Samuel Weibly, Cornelius Baker, Mary Reeder, 



196 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

Henrj Wolf, George Stahl, Hannah Stump, 

Conrad Comp, Samuel Ebert, Susan Gutshall, 

Simon Gutshall, Henry AlUson, Ann Stump, 

Andrew Kessler, Mary A. Shoemaker, Susanna Weibly, 

David Stahl, Susan Bernheisel, Sarah A. Stump. 

Andrew Schreffler, Cath. E. Shoemaker, 

George Briner, Hannah Gutshall, 

During the summer of 1858, the matter relating to a division 
of the Loysville charge was agitated. The charge was too large 
and laborious for one minister, and Rev. Willard's health began 
to fail in consequence of incessant and severe application to supply 
the wants of the members. On the 26th of October, 1858, a di- 
vision of the Loysville charge was effected, and he concluded to 
resign and thus open the way for each charge to call its own pas- 
tor. As he had, however, for some time been instructing a class 
of catechumens, he continued to meet them a few weeks longer, 
and on the 6th of November, 1848, the following persons were 
confirmed : 

Jacob Guttshall, Catharine Baltozer, IMary E. Bower, 

Daniel Leiby, Lydia A. Gutshall, Susan Schreffler, 

William H. Leiby, Clara Stambaugh, Flora A. Stambaugh. 

Emeline Schreffler, Mary A. Gutshall, 

The confirmation of these persons, and the administration of the 
Lord's Supper on the day following, closed the ministerial labors 
of Rev. Willard at this place. He had with great acceptance 
served this congregation about two years and a half. 

The new charge, consisting of the Zion and St. Paul's congre- 
gations, and now known as the Blain charge, was then vacant 
about four months. Having received and accepted a call, the 

Rev. John T. Williams, 

as the first pastor of the Blain charge, commenced his ministerial 
labors on the 1st of April, 1859. He located at Blain, and 
preaches here once every two weeks. 

Early in the spring of 1860, the charge erected a fine parson- 



CIlAFrER III. 197 

age at Blain for the pastor. This was highly necessary, and the 
congregation deserve great credit for the manner in which they 
accomplished this needful work. Every charge ought to have a 
parsonage. It saves expense, and is a great convenience to pas- 
tor and people. 

Having been carefully instructed, in the spring of 1860 the 
following persons were confirmed : 

John Baker, Miss Adaline Stroup, 
Andrew Shearer, " Eliza Jane Shearer, 

Baltzer Beistlein, " Malinda J. Boltosser, 

Mr. Beistlein, " Ebert. 

This congregation requires about one-half of the preaching in 
the German language. But as there are no German schools in 
this community, the use of the English language will gradually 
supersede that of the German, and will finally supplant it altoge- 
ther here, as it has done in nearly all the other Lutheran congre- 
gations in the county. 

As the old Church-rules or Constitution had long ago become 
obsolete, and the congregation was in a manner without any rules 
for government and discipline, in November, 1860, the Formula 
appended to the Lutheran Hymn-Book was adopted, not without 
opposition, as the Constitution of the congregation. At the same 
tinie a move was made towards having the congregation incorpo- 
rated. We may well ask, how can a congregation manage its 
afi"airs properly, and administer discipline fairly without a Consti- 
tution ? The pastor did well in urging the adoption of a Consti- 
tution. To have the congregation incorporated was also a move in 
the right direction. From the charter of incorporation, dated Ja- 
nuary, 1861, we make the following extracts, exhibiting the posi- 
tion of the congregation as to doctrine and government : 

" That whereas they (the members) have associated themselves 
together for the purpose of worshipping Almighty God according 
to the faith and discipline of the Lutheran Church in the United 
States of America, and for said purpose, &c. — Art. 2. This 
church acknowledges itself to be a member of and belonging to 
17* 



198 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Central Pennsylvania, and 
as such recognizes the Augsburg Confession of Faith as a sub- 
stantially correct symbol of its faith, and the Constitution and 
Discipline adopted by the congregation as its rule of government 
and discipline. — Art. 3. The pastor, or pastors, of said church 
shall be elected as the Constitution of the church prescribes, and 
must be a member of an acknowledged Evangelical Lutheran 
Synod of the United States, or if not a member of the Evangeli- 
cal Lutheran Synod of Central Pennsylvania when elected, he or 
they must unite with it at its first meeting thereafter, and a refu- 
sal to do so shall be regarded and taken as a resignation," &c. 

Having been carefully instructed for some time in the Cate- 
chism, on the 3d of May, 1862, the following persons were con- 
firmed : 

George Stum, Lydia Gutshall, Mary A. Stahl, 

George Fry, Catharine Shuman, Mary A. Kessler. 

Elizabeth C. Briner, 

Much labor is required to make all the members of this con- 
gregation efficient. Many of them, living a considerable distance 
from the house of God, are very indifferent and do not attend the 
ordinances of the sanctuary, nor concern themselves about the in- 
terests of the church and their souls, as it is their duty to do. 
As the charge is reduced, and as the pastor resides among 'the 
members, it is to be hoped that the large Lutheran population in 
that region will be gradually brought into a state of progress and 
activity. There are in the congregation many most excellent men, 
whose hearts are alive to every good cause and who are willing to 
do their utmost to elevate the congregation in piety, intelligence, 
and Christian benevolence ; but there are also many who care but 
little about these things, and whose hearts are not lighted with 
wisdom from on high. The present pastor has already accom- 
plished much in the way of general reform, and the hope is en- 
tertained that in future still more will be accomplished by biui. 
To this end may God bless his labors, and stir up the hearts of 
all the members to prayer and every good work ! 



CHAPTER III. 199 

'Lord, shall we lie so sluggish still ! 
And never act our parts ? 
Come, holy Dove, from the heav'nly hill, 
Renew and warm our hearts. 

' Then shall our active spirits move, 
Upward our souls shall rise ; 
With hands of faith and wings of love 
We'll fly and take the prize." 



SECTION 11. 

ST. PAUI,'S LUTHERAN CHURCH IN MADISON TOWNSHIP. 

Most of the members of St. Paul's Churcli belonged formerly 
to Zion Church at Blain, some few to the congregation at Loys- 
ville, and other places. As they had a considerable distance to 
the nearest church, they concluded, in 1855, to organize them- 
selves into a congregation and erect a church in their midst. 
The members united heartily in this good work. The congre- 
gation was regularly organized early in the spring of 1855, by the 

Rev. Reuben Weiser, 

when the following brethren were elected and installed as the first 
board of officers of the congregation : 

Jacob Arnold, ) „, , J- B. Zimmerman, | 

Jacob Kunkel, \ ' Samuel Arnold, ) 

George Hohenshilt, ") 

Henry Wolf, | ^'''''''''- 

The corner-stone of St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Cimrch 
was laid on the 27th day of May, 1855, when the Eev. Daniel 
Sell, the only minister present on the occasion, preached a suitable 
sermon from Isa. 28 : 16. At this time. Rev. R. Weiser, the 
pastor, was absent on a visit to Texas. The church-edifice was 
reared speedily and successfully. In September, 1855, Rev. 



200 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

Weiser resigned the Loysville pastorate. The charge was then 
vacant about eight months. 

Consecration of St. Paul's Church. 

The church was dedicated to the service of the Most High on 
Sunday, the 22d of December, 1855. Rev. Messrs. J. Evans, 
M. J. Alleman and P. P. Lane, were present on this occasion and 
conducted the exercises. The meeting commenced on Friday 
evening pi-evious and closed on Sunday evening. The Sunday 
morning exercises were introduced with a prayer-meeting, after 
which Rev. Alleman preached in the German language from 
Rom. 5 : 1, and was followed in the English language by Rev. 
Evans, who preached from Psalm 42 : 1, 2. The Rev. Lane 
attended then to the liturgical exercises, and consecrated the 
church by the distinctive title of >SV. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran 
Church. 

The church-edifice is of brick, neat and substantial, forti/ by 
Jiff}/ feet in size. It has a vestibule, and is surmounted by a 
steeple and sweet-sounding bell. The internal arrangement is 
tasty and judicious. The entire cost of erecting the building was 
about seventeen hundred dollars. The church is located in Madi- 
son Township, about five miles west of Loysville, and on the main 
road leading from Loysville to Blain, on a tract of land originally 
located by John Crawford in 1766, but now owned by the Messrs. 
Clarks. The site is eligible and in every way convenient. 

Rev. Philip Willard 

commenced his pastoral labors here, in connection with the Loys- 
ville charge, on the 25th of May, 1856. Soon after he had 
entered on the discharge of his ministerial duties, he commenced 
instructing a class of catechumens, and here, as well as in the 
other congregations of the charge, the Lord blessed his labors to 
the edification of Christians and the conversion of sinners. On 
the 25th of October, 1856, the following persons were admitted 
to full communion by the rite of confirmation : 



CHAPTER III. 201 

Jacob Clausert, Catharine Balclozer, 

George A. Shuman, Mary Ernst, 

Andrew Hohenshilt, Amanda Reed, 

Catharine Loy, Elizabeth Seager, 

Mary A. Loy, Lydia A. Seager, 

Ellen Loy, Mary Stahl. 
Mary J. Beaston, 

During the early part of 1857, the Lord poured out graciously 
his Spirit upon the congregation. A number professed to have 
realized a change of heart during this season of refreshing from 
on high. These were carefully instructed for a few months, and 
on the 23d of May, 1857, the following were confirmed : 

John A. Garber, Svisanna Burrel, 

Franklin D. Baldoser, Mary M. Ewing, 

John Bergstresser, Sarah A. Garland, 

Sarah J. Seager, Elizabeth Shatto, 

Amanda H. Bergstresser, Mary A. Moyer, 

Mary A. Zimmerman, Sarah Koon. 
Elizabeth Beistlein, 

In the charter of incorporation, dated August 7th, 1857, among 
other matters not necessary to state, we find the following item of 
general interest : 

" Article 5. Whatsoever is not otherwise specially provided for 
in this Constitution shall be regulated according to the Constitu- 
tion, form of government, discipline, rules and usages of the 
Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Central Pennsylvania and of the 
General Synod of the Lutheran Church in the United States," &c. 

Trustees: Daniel Ernst, Samuel Shope and Michael J. Loy. 

On the 14th of March, 1858, the following persons were ad- 
mitted to full communion by confirmation : 

Thomas Messimer, John Calhoon, Catharine Calhoon. 

On the 6th of September, 1858, James Clark and Ann his 
wife, and Andrew M. Clark, made a deed to Daniel Ernst, William 
Zimmerman and Samuel Shope, Trustees of St. Paul's Evangelical 



202 cnuRCHES between the mountains. 

Lutheran Church in Madison Township, conveying to said Trus- 
tees one acre and fifty-nine perches of land, strict measure, for 
the consideration of sixty dollars. See Record-BooJc, Letter R., 
p. 200. 

In October, 1858, this congregation and that at Blain withdrew 
from the Loysville charge, and united in the formation of the 
Blain charge, and in November following Rev. P. AVillard re- 
signed. The Blain charge, just formed, was vacant about four 
months. Having received and accepted a call, 

liev. John T. Williams 

commenced his pastoral labors in this charge on the 1st of April, 

1859. He preaches here once every two weeks, alternately in 
the German and English languages. After having attended 
lectures on the Catechism for some time, on the 14th of April, 

1860, the following persons were confirmed : 

Daniel Garber, John H. Briner, 

Daniel Beistlein, Anna E. Zimmerman, 

Samuel Koon, Sarah J. Stroup, 

John "W. Smith, Catharine M. Koon, 

Samuel A. Smith, Caroline Loy, 

Henry Hohenshilt, Anna E. Roush, 

John Roush, Jane E. Beistlein. 

Thus fourteen more were added to the membership of this con- 
gregation. May we not hope that they will be useful in their 
day, and afterwards be received to glory. 

" Lord, we accept, with thankful heart, 
The hope thy gracious words impart ; 
We come with trembling, yet rejoice, 
And bless the kind inviting voice. 

" Dear Savior, let thy wondrous love 
Confirm our faith, our fears remove ; 
sweetly influence ev'ry breast, 
And guide us to eternal rest." 



CHAPTER III. 203 



SECTION III. 

EMANUEL CHURCH NEAR ICKESBURG IN SAVILLE TOWNSHIP. 

At the beginning of the present century a number of Lutheran 
families settled in the vicinity where Ickesburg was afterwards 
located. These all went to church at Loysville, a distance from 
eight to twelve miles. After the erection of St. Andrew's or 
Shuman's Church, in 1831, some attended preaching there. The 
want of a church in their midst was deeply felt. Kev. Heim 
preached for them occasionally in private dwellings and school- 
houses. This was however not satisfactory, as the members could 
not but see the advantage to themselves and their children of 
having a house of worship and regular preaching in their neigh- 
borhood. It would seem that Rev. Heim did not encourage them 
to erect a church, and when it was built he never preached in it. 
But without the encouragement of any minister, the Lutherans, 
in union with a sister denomination, were minded to have a 
church, which they also erected about two miles and a half west 
of Ickesburg in Saville Township. The following is the heading 
of the subscription circulated for the purpose of securing aid 
towards erecting the contemplated church : 

*•' We, the subscribers, promise to pay the sums annexed to our 
names for the purpose of building a Lutheran and Reformed 
Church on the land of Henry Hartman, on Buffalo Creek, near 
McKinley's Mill. July 30th, 1839." 

The amount subscribed was encouraging. Messrs. Conrad Rice 
and Jonathan Swartz were chosen the building committee. The 
church was erected in the summer of 1840. In the spring of 
1841, it was consecrated to the service of God and received the 
distinctive appellation, Emanvel Church, though it is commonly 
known as Buifalo or Stone Church. Rev. S. R. Boyer, then 
pastor of the Lutheran Church at Mifflintown, Juniata County, 
and Rev. Henry Aurandt of the German Reformed Church, 
officiated on the occasion of the consecration. It is a rouo'h stone 



204 cnuRCHES between the mountains. 

edifice, forty-six by fhirti/six feet in size, without gallery ; it is 
entered by one side door and two end doors, and has two aisles, 
two side rows of pews, and one double block of centre pews. 

After the church was erected and dedicated, the Lutherans 
were in want of a pastor. For reasons not known to the writer. 
Father Heim did not, and, perhaps on account of his extended 
charge and the increasing infirmities of age, could not preach for 
the members here. For about one year. Rev. Boyer preached for 
them an occasional sermon. The members were not organized 
into a congregation ; and for want of the regular ministrations of 
the sanctuary by a minister of their own Church, a number of the 
principal Lutheran members with their families were induced to 
unite with the denomination that exclusively occupied the church. 
Thus, a number of Lutherans were gradually absorbed and drawn 
into another denomination, under the specious plea that it made 
DO difi"erence to what denomination they belonged. Some of the 
members were, however, not so pliant nor so easily hoodwinked. 
They argued very correctly, that if it made no difference to what 
Church they belonged, they would remain in their own Church. 
They therefore secured, early in 1847, the visits of the 

JRev. Lloyd Kni(jht, 

of the Bloomfield charge, who took a deep interest in their spiri- 
tual welfare and made every proper effort to collect the remaining 
scattered members into a congregation. Though the church had 
been built mainly by the Lutherans, yet, strange as it may seem, 
Kev. Knight was at first scarcely allowed to preach in it, and his 
efforts to organize a Lutheran congregation were met with strong 
opposition from those who occupied the church. Here we have 
a fine illustration of the amiable spirit of union-churchism ! A 
debt of some hundred dollars still rested on the church, and it 
was finally agreed that if the Lutherans would pay that debt, they 
should be entitled to one-half of the property and of the church. 
This was very generous indeed ! especially so, when they had done 
most towards erecting it in the beginning. Thus, the advantage 
to some people of building union-churches becomes strikingly ap- 



CHAPTER III. 205 

pai-ent ! The Lutherans, however, paid that debt, and of course 
all diflficulties had to cease. In the meantime Rev. Knight col- 
lected and instructed a class of catechumens. The organization 
of the Lutheran congregation was finally effected, and great suc- 
cess attended the pastor's labors. As no church-record was then 
kept, we will transcribe from a letter of Rev. Knight to the writer 
an account of his pastoral labors here : 

'' The Ickesburg or Buffalo congregation (Lutheran) was orga- 
nized by me on Saturday, the 12th of June, 1847, with fifty- 
three members. The following brethren were elected the Church- 
Council, viz. : 

Benjamin Rice, j ^^^^^.^_ George Rice, | ^^^^^^^^_ 

John Butturff, ) John Peck, ) 

Conrad Rice, Trustee. 

^^Th.Q first communion was held on the 13th of June. Thirty- 
nine persons gave in their names as members and communicants, 
besides the following persons, who had on the previous day (the 
12th) been received to full communion by the rite of confirma- 
tion : 

Samuel Rice, Elizabeth Rice, 

David B. Kistler, Susanna Kistler, 

John Rice, Sarah Rice, 

John Sanderson, Catharine A. Heim, 

Jonathan Rice, Catharine Kochenderfer, 

Margaret Butturff, Mary A. Otto, 

Sarah Butturff, Susan Otto. 

" The Lord smiled propitiously on the labors of his unworthy 
servant. The congregation was truly revived, and many of those 
then added to the Church are now among its most efficient mem- 
bers. Having attended a course of lectures on the doctrines of 
our holy Christianity, and being found possessed of the requisite 
qualifications, on the 14th of May, 1848, the following persons 
were adinitted to full communion by confirmation : 
18 



206 



CHURCHES BETAVEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 



George Butturif, 
Samuel Hench, 
John Ickes, 
Michael Ickes, 
Jeremiah Hall, 
Robert C Boden, 
John Hollenbaugh, 
George F. Flickinger, 
Henry S. Saylor, 
Samuel Fuller, 
Andrew Snyder, 
William Yohn, 
Robert Matthews, 



John ButturfF (baptized), 
John M. Evril " 
John Hassler " 

Sarah Snyder " 

Sophia Hall, 
Sarah T. Rice, 
Nancy J. Rice, 
Alice Rice, 
Ann Delancy, 
Elizabeth Saylor, 
Mary Bringman, 
Elizabeth Saylor, 
Martraret Yohn. 



" After another year had passed away, a number of persons were 
found willing to attend lectures on the Catechism, and having re- 
ceived instruction for some time, on the loth of May, 1849, the 
following were confirmed : 



Nicholas Hench, 
William Rice, 
Adam Rice, 
Daniel Rice, 
Adam Bitner, 
David Bitner, 
Joseph Saylor, 
Samuel Duffield, 
Benjamin Flickinger, 



Jacob Bringman, 
William Kinzer (baptized), 
Mary Kinzer, 
Catharine J. Hench, 
Sarah J. Kepner, 
Mary A. Bitner, 
Susan Flickinger, 
Elizabeth Flickinger, 
Margaret Keyser. 



" I served the congregation a little more than two years. 
During this time Ji/(i/-eiyht persons were received to full commu- 
nion by confirmation. This was my favorite, most interesting, 
and beloved congregation. I resigned in June, 1849. 

''Yours, truly, 

"Lloyd Knight." 



Rev. Knight preached here once every three weeks, exclusively 



CHAPTER IIT. 207 

in the English language, the German not being required by the 
congregation. In July, 1849, he was succeeded by the 

Rev. Jacob Martin, 

who had a large charge to supply and many difficulties to over- 
come. He labored indefatigably, and was highly esteemed by the 
members of this congregation. Souls were converted under his 
ministry and the interests of Christ's kingdom were promoted. 
When he took charge of this congregation, a church-book was 
bought and regular records of baptisms, confirmations, &c., were 
made. He preached here once every three weeks, alternately in 
the forenoon and afternoon. He preached with great energy and 
unction from on high, and to this day many tell the happy effect 
his sermons had on them. 

Having been for some time diligently instructed in the Cate- 
chism of the Church, and being found possessed of the requisite 
spiritual and doctrinal qualifications, on the 27th of April, 1851, 
the following persons were confirmed : 

George H. Hench, Sarah Cath. Rice, 

Henry Orris, Elizabeth Rice, 

David McKenzie, Margaret Rice, 

James Matthews, Eliz. Ann Hench, 

Mary A. Rice, Susan Bausum. 

Having faithfully served the congregation for two years and 
nine months, Rev. Martin resigned in April, 1852, and was suc- 
ceeded, in June of the same year, by the 

Rev. William Gerhardt, 

who met at this church a class of catechumens for some time, but 
before they were confirmed he resigned the Bloomfield charge in 
June, 1853, having served it as pastor only one year. The con- 
gregation and charge were then vacant about eight months. A 
call was then extended by the charge to the 

Rev. Adam Height, 

who, having accepted the call, commenced his ministerial labors 



208 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

here on the 1st of March, 1854. He had communion but once 
at this church, viz., on the 9th of April, 1854, when John Rei- 
singer was admitted to full communion by confirmation. At this 
place Rev. Height met also a class of catechumens for some time; 
but for reasons not necessary to state, and before they were con- 
firmed, he ceased to labor as pastor in September, having preached 
here only about seven months. The disappointment of two classes 
of catechumens in succession, had an unhappy efi'ect, and is much 
to be regretted. The charge was then vacant about eight months. 
During this time the Rev. J. Evans of Newville, Pa., by request, 
visited the congregation in December, 1854, and preached a 
number of sermons and administered the Lord's Supper, and the 
same was also done in May, 1855, by the Rev. L. Knight of Hol- 
lidaysburg. Pa. 

Rev. D. K Focht 

of Chambersburg, Pa., having accepted a call from the Bloomfield 
charge, entered on the discharge of his ministerial labors in the 
charge on the 1st of June, 1855, and at this church preached his 
introductory sermon, on the 3d of June, from Exod. 33 : 14. 
He preached here once every three weeks, alternately in the fore- 
noon and afternoon. Having been carefully instructed in the doc- 
trines of our holy religion, on the 29th of December, 1855, the 
following persons were confirmed : 

George C. Rice, Nicholas J. Hench, 

Henry ButturflF, Francis H. Hench, 

Suwarrow W. Witmer, Mrs. Sophia Weibly, 
Samuel Rice, " Sarah Bender, 

William Rice, Miss Jane Mary Rice, 
George Rice, " Sophia Orris. 

Davidson Miller, 

" Let the sweet work of pray'r and praise 
Employ our daily breath : 
Thus we're prepar'd for future days, 
Or fit for early death." 



CHAPTER III. 209 

A year having passed away, a number of persons were found 
willing to attend lectures on the Catechism. The Lord graciously 
visited this class in the outpouring of his Holy Spirit. Being 
duly instructed and accounted worthy of full communion, on the 
9th of November, 1856, the following persons were confirmed : 
Wesley W. Fuller, Miss Ann Eliz. Bucher, 

William Flickinger, " Susan J. Crist, 

George J. Delancy, " Susan Rice, 

Benj. F. Rice, " Catharine Rice, 

Philip Z. Resinger, " Mary J. Flickinger, 

Jacob Resinger, " Mary E. Resinger. 

"Call'd to bear the Christian name, 
May our vows and life accord ; 
And our ev'ry deed proclaim 
' Holiness unto the Lord ! ' " 

On the 4th of April, 1857, Mrs. Hannah Bitner, and William 
Smith on the 19th of July following, were admitted to full com- 
munion by confirmation ; also in October, 1857, Mrs. Elizabeth 
Witmer, and in April, 1859, Miss Hetta Bausum, were received 
as members by certificate. 

As the Loysville charge was weakened by the formation of the 
Blain charge, application was made by the former for Emanuel 
Church. As the Bloomfield charge was large and Emanuel 
Church lay more convenient to Loysville than Bloomfield, it was 
for the time being and on certain conditions agreed to yield 
Emanuel Church in favor of Loysville at the expiration of the 
then pastoral year. Accordingly, after having served the congre- 
gation/our years, the Rev. D. H. Focht preached his valedictory 
sermon on Sunday, the 22d of May, 1859, from 2 Cor. 13 : 14, 
and was succeeded on the 1st of June following by the 

Rev. G. 31. Settlemoyer, 
who then served the congregation in connection with the Loysville 
charge, and preached for it once every two weeks. Rev. Settle- 
moyer instructed a class of catechumens for some time, and on 
the 28th of April, 1860, the following were confirmed : 
18* 



210 



CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 



John W. Bernheisel, 
John R. Boden, 
George R. Hall, 
Miss Jane E. Boden, 



Miss Elizabeth Heim, 
" Mary E. Hench, 
" Emerata llice, 
" Jemima Shaeffer. 



On the 30th of March, 1861, the following were received as 
members by certificate, viz., William Bower, Mrs. Leah Bower, 
Mrs. Susanna Johnston, and Miss Mary Ellen Bower. 

Having served the congregation as pastor for two years, Rev. 
Settlemoyer resigned on the 1st of June, 1861. The congrega- 
tion numbers at this time about one hundi'ed and fifteen members. 
May the Lord soon send this people another shepherd after his 
own heart ! 

Immediately after the resignation of Rev. Settlemoyer, the con- 
gregation dissolved its connection with the Loysville pastorate and 
united with the Blain charge, and on the 1st of June, 1861, the 

Rev. John T. Williams 
commenced his pastoral labors here. May his labors be crowned 
by the blessing of heaven ! and may the dear people of this con- 
gregation prosper in every Christian virtue and grace ! This is 
the sincere prayer of their former pastor. 

Since the organization of Emanuel congregation, on the 12th 
of June, 1847, the following brethren have served it as its 
officers : 

Elders. 

from June, 1847 to May, 1850. 
" " 1847 to " 1850. 



Benjamin Rice, 
John Butturff", 
Conrad Rice, 
Henry Harman, 
Benjamin Rice, 
John Butturfi', 
John Sanderson, 
Jacob Reisinger, 
Benjamin Rice, 
John Sanderson, 
Nicholas Hench, 
Beniamin Rice, 



May, 1850 only a short time. 

" 1850toMarch,1852. 
Aug., 1850 to " 1852. 
March, 1852 to May, 1854. 

" 1852 to '' 1857. 
May, 1854 to " 1857. 

'' 1857 to — 1859. 

" 1857 to — 1859. 

" 1859 yet in office. 

" 1859 " 





CHAPTER III. 




Deacons. 


George Rice, 


from June, 1847 to May, 1850. 


John Peck, 


a 


" 1847 to '' 1850. 


Nicholas Hench, . 


a 


May, 1850 to March, 1852. 


John Sanderson, . 


a 


" 1850 to '' 1852. 


Samuel Rice, 


a 


March, 1852 to Aug., 1855. 


Jeremiah Hall, . 


u 


" 1852 to " 1855. 


David B. Kistler, 


li 


Aug., 1855 to May, 1857. 


Moses Gr. Witmer, 


a 


" 1855 to " 1857. 


Henry Hall, 


a 


May, 1857 to — 1859. 


Peter Flickinger, 


(( 


" 1857 to — 1859. 


Jonathan Rice, . 


(( 


" 1857 to — 1859. 


Samuel Rice, 


ic 


1859 yet in office. 


John Peck, 


u 


1859 


Peter Shaeffer, . 


a 


1859 '' 




Trustee. 


Conrad Rice, 


from June, 1847 yet in ofiice. 




SECTION IV. 



211 



LUTHERAN CONGREGATION IN HENRY'S VALLEY, JACKSON TOWNSHIP. 



Until lately this was only a preaching station. As some of the 
members living in this valley belonged to one of the congrega- 
tions of the Newville charge in Cumberland County, and some to 
the congregation at Blain in Perry County, the Rev. J.. Evans of 
Newville, Rev. I. J. Stine, Principal of Loysville Academy, and 
Rev. P. Willard of Loysville, preached, each, occasionally for 
them at a school-house. Henry's Valley lies between high moun- 
tains, is narrow, in the southeast corner of Perry County, Jackson 
Township, and is not accessible from Newville or Blain but by 
crossing a high mountain. In this secluded valley a number of 



212 CHURCUES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

pious members of the Church made their homes. They were 
devoted to the Church, and had for many years themselves regu- 
larly conducted a prayer-meeting in a school-house. Father 
Christian Henry, one of the best of Christians, collected the mem- 
bers for social worship, and led the exercises. Sometimes the 
members would cross the mountains, a distance from ten to twelve 
miles, to meet with the people of God in the sanctuary. Did 
space permit, we might give many interesting facts "respecting the 
unostentatious piety of this people in the mountains. 

After the formation of the Blain charge, the members in this 
valley looked to that charge for the preaching of the Gospel among 
them. Hence, when in 1859 the 

Rev. John T. Williams 

took charge of the Blain pastorate, he also visited and preached 
for the members in Henry's Valley about once every four weeks. 
By this the members — about forty in the valley — were much en- 
couraged ; their prayer-meeting was generally well attended, and 
the prospect of establishing a congregation began to brighten. 
The subject of organizing a congregation had been agitated for 
some time. But now the necessity of such a step became ap- 
parent to all. Therefore, on the 24th of November, 18G0, the 
congregation was organized with twenty-four members (a number 
of others joined in afterwards) and the following brethren were 
installed as ofl&cers : 

Christian Henry, ) Henry Snyder, ") 

T 1 c J \ Elders. T~i • 1 tr r Deacons. 

John Snyder, j Daniel Henry, ) 

Rev. Williams preaches here once every four weeks in a school- 
house. A suitable house of worship is what the congregation now 
very much wants. May the Lord bless this little flock I 

" Dear Shepherd of thy people, here 
Thy presence now display ; 
As thou hast giv'n a place for pray'r, 
So give them hearts to pray. 



CHAPTER II. 213 

Show them some token of thy love, 

Their fainting hope to raise ; 
And pour thy blessings from above, 

That they may render praise." 



SECTION V. 

PREACHING STATIONS CONNECTED WITH THE BLAIN CHARGE. 

Besides tte four organized congregations, Eev. Williams 
preaches at present also at the following preaching stations con- 
nected with the Blain charge : 

1. At Lupfer's Tannery, in Jackson Township, he preaches 
once every four weeks in a school-house. The attendance here 
is good and the prospects encouraging. 

2. At Sandy Hill school-house, in Madison Township, he 
preaches also once every four weeks. At this place the attend- 
ance on the preaching of the Gospel is good, and good is accom- 
plished. 

3. At New Germantown, four or five miles west of Blain, he 
preaches once every six weeks. 

Thus within the bounds of the Blain charge there is yet much 
" land to possess." Members of the Church are found scattered 
everywhere in that section of Sherman's Valley, and also in the 
minor adjoining valleys, so that at many central points small con- 
gregations might be organized. But the labor at present required 
by the Blain charge is more than a man can perform with pleasure 
to himself or advantage to the people. To remedy this evil, the 
members must unite in supporting the pastor at Blain, as they are 
abundantly able if all do their duty, and then the charge may be 
divided and an additional minister secured. This is the only way 
all can be adequately supplied with the preached Gospel and the 
interests of souls and Christ's kingdom promoted. for more 
men to reap the harvest ! 



214 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

" Jesus, thy wand'ring sheep behold ! 
See, Lord, in tender mercy, see. 
Poor souls that cannot find the fold 
Till sought and gathered in by thee. 

" Thou, only thou, the kind and good, 
The sheep-redeeming Shepherd art ; 
Collect thy flock, and gire them food, 
And pastors after thine own heart.'" 



CHAPTER IV. 215 



CHAPTER IV. 

PETERSBURG CHARGE. 

This charge was formed in February, 1850, at Bloomfield, by 
a convention of delegates from the Lutheran congregations in 
Perry County. See pp. 52-54. A part of what now constitutes 
the charge was at first missionary ground. Rev. Andrew Berg 
accepted an invitation in November, 1842, to visit this destitute 
field. He preached at Petersburg, New BulFalo, Buck's School- 
house, Liverpool, and perhaps also at some other places, for about 
six months, that is, from November, 1842, to the middle of June, 
1843. In his annual report, in 1843, the President of the West 
Pennsylvania Synod says : "On the 21st of October, 1842, I re- 
ceived a letter from Rev. A. Berg, in which he informed me that 
he designed visiting Petersburg, Liverpool, and other congrega- 
tions in that region, and requested me to give my consent and 
advice. I advised him to visit those places, and if possible take 
charge of them. I promised him, at the same time, towards his 
support, for the first year, thirty dollars from the legacy in the 
hands of Synod. But as he resigned this field of labor after 
having spent in it about six months, I allowed him only fifteen 
dollars, with which amount he was also satisfied.'' After the 
resignation of Rev. Berg, all the congregrations now composing 
the charge, except Mount Zion on Fishing Creek, were served in 
connection with Bloomfield until February, 1850, when the charge 
was regularly constituted. 



216 CHtRCHES BETAVEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

SECTION I. 

Christ's (lutheran) church of Petersburg. 

A number of Lutheran families settled at Petersburg and its 
vicinity soon after the town was located. These had no church 
of their own nearer than New Buffalo or Fishing Creek, both 
some five or eight miles off. It was chiefly through the exertions 
of Dr. Philip Ebcrt that they secured a pastor. When the West 
Pennsylvania Synod held its sessions at Bloomfield in September, 
1842, he prevailed t)n Rev. Berg, who at that time received 
license to preach, to visit Petersburg and the members scattered 
along the west bank of the Susquehanna as far up as Liverpool. 
This was the beginning of the forming of the congregation at 
Petersburg. In November, 1842, 

Rev. Andrew Berg 

commenced his pastoral labors here. The use of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church was kindly granted. Here he preached once 
every four weeks. The use of the German language in preaching 
was never required by this congregation. Eev. Berg's labors 
were blessed by the Lord, the scattered members were collected 
and all took courage. At the close of December, 1842, the con- 
gregation was regularly organized, when the following brethren 
were elected and installed as its first officers : 

Jonathan Michener, Sen., ") 
George Keim, Elder. ^^ pj^jjj^ ^^^^^^ | Deacons. 

The first communion was held on the 1st of January, 1843, 
when the following names were recorded as members of the con- 
gregation : 

John Hiltner, Abraham Lcady, Rebecca Kulp, 

Jacob Sidel, Eleazer Michener, Mary Hantz, 

Andrew Hantz, Sarah Hiltuer, Letitia Ebert, 

Amos A. Jones, Sophia Fie, Mary A. Grove, 

Dr. Philip Ebert, Mary Michener, Mary A. Remirk. 



CHAPTER IV. 217 

The congregation, though small, was now regularly constituted 
and assumed a more encouraging position. The want of a suitable 
house of worship was however seriously felt. Rev. Mr. Berg 
succeeded in collecting a class of catechumens. These he dili- 
gently instructed for some time, and on the 4th of June, 1843, 
the following persons were confirmed and admitted to communion : 

jiarpn^Keimj Cath. Michener, Edward Miller, 

Jon. Michener, Moriah Keim, Michael Koup, 

Philip Michener, Eliza Stevenson, George Keim, 

Eliza A. Keiser, Mary Eddy, Samuel Garman, 

Susan Clandenin, Mary Sellers, Jane Jones, 

Susan Jones, Cath. Hiltner, Mary Shannon. 

Though the congregation was prospering and increasing in 
numbers under the faithful labors of Rev. Berg, and it was hoped 
that by patient perseverance much would be accomplished for 
the cause of Christ, but to the sincere regret of all. Rev. Berg 
thought it to be his duty to change his pastoral relation. Near 
the close of June, 1843, he resigned and accepted a call from the 
Shrewsbury charge, York County, Pa. He was much beloved by 
this people, and to him belongs the honor of establishing this 
congregation on a firm basis amid numerous difficulties. 

The congregation was then vacant about four months. Dr. 
Ebert again put forth efforts to secure a pastor. He addressed a 
letter to Synod, urging the necessity of a speedy supply. This 
letter was read before Synod in September, 1843, and, on motion, 
that body took the following action : 

" Resolved, That in view of Dr. Ebert's letter, the attention of 
applicants for licensure be called to the congregation at Peters- 
burg, and the congregations united therewith, in Perry County." 

Rev. Levi T. Williams, 

then a licentiate, accordingly accepted a call from Petersburg and 
the other congregations, and entered on the discharge of his 
pastoral duties in October, 1843. He preached here once every 
four weeks, and extended his labors to New Buffalo, Mount Pisgah, 



218 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

Newport, Bloomfield, and perhaps to some other points. He per- 
formed Home Missionary labor, and for some time received some 
aid from the Home Missionary Treasury of Synod. As the con- 
gregations were small and only in a formative state, much hard 
labor and self-denial were required, but these were not bestowed 
in vain, as the result clearly evinced. 

At Petersburg, for want of a church, the congregation labored 
under great disadvantage. Hence, soon after Rev. Williams had 
taken charge, the subject of erecting a house of worship was agi- 
tated, and measures were taken to effect this needful end. Having 
land as a suitable location on the edge of the town. Dr. Ebert 
generously offered one acre of it to the congregation, and executed 
a deed of conveyance, from which we submit the following ex- 
tract : 

" This Indenture, made the 7th day of May, A.D., 1844, be- 
tween Dr. Philip Ebert of Penn Township, Perry County, State of 
Pennsylvania, and Letitia his wife, of the one part, and the Council 
of the Lutheran congregation at Petersburg, &c., ... of the other 
part, Witnesseth that the said Dr. Philip Ebert and Letitia his 
wife for and in consideration of the sum of one hundred dollars, 
... to them in hand paid by the said Church-Council of the Luthe- 
ran congregation of Petersburg, &c., ... do grant, bargain, sell, &c., 
. . . to said Church-Council of the Lutheran congregation of Peters- 
burg, &c., ... all that lot or piece of land, situate, &c., . . . con- 
taining one acre. Said Dr. Philip Ebert, &c., . . . hath granted, 
sold said lot or one acre to said Council and their successors in 
office to and for the only proper use, benefit, and behoof of said 
Church-Council of the Lutheran Church of Petersburg, &c." 

This lot of ground lies on the west edge of the borough of Pe- 
tersburg, on a high and dry bluff, commanding a fine view of 
the town, the river and the mountains all around for a considera- 
ble distance, and is in every way a desirable locality for a church 
and graveyard. The foundation was run up, and on the 19th of 
May, 1844, the corner-stone was laid. A number of documents 
and a copy of the following declaration were deposited in the cor- 
ner-stone : 



CHAPTER IV. 219 

"declaration at the laying of the corner-stone. 

" In the name of the Triune God. Amen. 

" Whereas the Evangelical Lutheran congregation, now wor- 
shipping in the Methodist Episcopal Church in this place, be- 
lieves it necessary to build a house of worship of their own, and 
that its location in this vicinity would best subserve the interests 
of the congregation and religion generally ; and Whereas we are 
desirous of perpetuating Christianity by the faithful preaching of 
God's word and the administration of the ordinances of religion, 
for our mutual benefit and improvement as well as that of our pos- 
terity, — We, therefore, the members of this congregation, in reli- 
ance on the Great Head of the Church, Jesus Christ, the same to- 
day, yesterday, and forever, have resolved to build upon this 
ground a house of worship, and do now publish to the world the 
olject and society for which it is to be erected : Wherefore, be it 
known to the present and future generations, that we here, on 
this 19th day of May, A.D., 1844 (John Tyler being President 
of the United States, and D. R. Porter Governor of the State of 
Pennsylvania), do lay the corner-stone of this Evangelical Luthe- 
ran church; and should God prosper the work of our hands and 
the edifice be completed, it shall be dedicated forever to the ser- 
vice of the Triune God, Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, and shall 
be known and called by the name of Christ s Church ; moreover, 
it shall be and remain forever an Evangelical Lutheran church, in 
which the doctrines of the Gospel of Jesus Christ, as they are 
substantially set forth in the Augsburg Confession of Faith, shall 
be preached, and the sacraments shall be administered in con- 
formity with the -usages of the Church, that thus it may appear 
to posterity what is our religious faith. Should there, however, 
a generation of men arise and obtain possession of this church, — 
men who deny the Lord that bought them and despise God's word 
and ordinances, and will not submit to the wholesome doctrines 
and discipline of the Church, we call heaven and earth to witness 
that we are free from their blood, — moreover, we call heaven and 



220 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

earth to witness that we love vital godliness and ardently desire 
its perpetuity, that we expect it from our children and children's 
children that they faithfully and perseveringly adhere to the doc- 
trines of the Cross, and that it is our prayer that the young and 
old may be awakened, converted, comforted, edified and prepared 
for the enjoyment of the sanctuary above. Prompted by such de- 
sires and having in view such objects, we trust we can confidently 
adopt the language of the Patriarch Jacob, and exclaim : ' This 
stone which we have set for a pillar shall be Grod's house.' Given 
at Petersburg, this 19th day of May, A.D., 1844, the sixty-se- 
venth year of the Independence of the United States of America, 
and subscribed by the Elders, Deacons, Building-Committee, and 
the Ministers present. 



George Keim, Elder. Andrew Hantz, 



Building 



Jon. Michener, Sr., ) j. Dr. Philip Ebert, r n 

^ ^ .,. ^ . T JJeacons. ^ ^ ' l Committee. 

Dr. Philip Ebert, J Edward Miller, 

Eev. Levi T. Williams, Pastor loci. 

Kev. Nicholas J. Stroh, Minister present." 

Heaven smiling on the good work thus begun in the name and 
fear of God, the edifice was speedily erected, and in November 
following it was completed. 

In September, 1844, Dr. Ebert, as lay delegate of the charge, 
attended Synod at Hanover, York County, Pa. 

On Saturday, the 9th of November, 1844, the following per- 
sons were confirmed : 

Mary Ann Leppert, Susan Keim, 

Christiana L. Keim, Mary A. Miller, 

and on Sunday, the 10th, the church was solemnly dedicated to 
the service of the Triune God. In the Lutheran Observer of 
November 29th, 1844, is given the following account of the con- 
secration of this church : 

" A new House of Worship. — We learn that on the 10th in- 
stant a new Evangelical Lutheran church, at Petersburg, Perry 
County, Pa., was dedicated to the service of the Triune God under 



CHAPTER IV. 221 

the name of Christ's Church. The Rev. Mr. Stroh performed the 
dedicatory ceremony, after which the Rev. Mr. Berg delivered an 
appropriate sermon from 1 Peter 2 : 5, ' Ye also, as living stones, 
are built together a spiritual house.' The edifice is of stone, forty 
feet square, with a gallery at one end, a neat pulpit, and well fur- 
nished with lights. This building has been erected by a few 
Lutherans in a place where two years ago the existence of the Lu- 
theran Church was scarcely known. The Rev. Levi T. Williams 
is the pastor. Dr. Ebert, who is a warm-hearted and whole-souled 
member, gave an acre of ground for the site of the church and for 
a graveyard, and also contributed very liberally towards the build- 
ing ; in short, by his unwearied exertion the church has been 
built, and he deserves well of the neighborhood and of the 
Church in general for his zeal and liberality in the good cause. 
We rejoice that that heretofore neglected and destitute region is 
at length favored with a house of worship, in which the pure Gos- 
pel will be preached with power and in simplicity, and the Gospel 
ordinances be regularly dispensed. May the blessing of God fol- 
low this good work, and our brother Ebert be richly rewarded in 
his person and family with all spiritual gifts and consolations I" 

During the beginning of 1845, the Lord poured out his Spirit 
graciously upon this congregation, and a number embraced a hope 
through Jesus Christ. The subjects of this revival were then for 
a time carefully instructed in the doctrines of religion, and on the 
22d of July, 1845, the following persons were confirmed : 
Michael Koup, Jr., Mary A. Wade, 

Susanna Keiser, Doan Michener (baptized). 

The following names appear also now for the first time on the 
list of members : 

Henry Bressler, John Price, Barbara Ensminger, 

David Ensminger, Letitia Branyan, Elizabeth Long, 

Peter Smith, Martha Bressler, Margaret Ashton. 

Jacob Long, Elizabeth Goodman, 

In September, 1845, Rev. Williams resigned, having served 
the charge in the Gospel about two years. Mr. V. Jones of Pe- 
19* 



222 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

tersburg, as delegate, attended Synod at Carlisle in September, 

1845. At this session of Synod Rev. Williams reported four con- 
gregations, viz. : Petersburg, Bloomfield, Newport, and Mount 
Pisgah, 42 infant and 5 adult baptisms, 42 confirmations, and 
196 communicants. The Lord owned and blessed his labors, and 
many still remain among us who own him as their spiritual father. 

Rev. Lloyd Kni(jht 

took charge of this congregation on the 1st of October, 1845, and 
served it in connection with Bloomfield, where he resided. His 
field of labor was large. He preached at Bloomfield, Petersburg, 
Newport, New Buffalo, Mount Pisgah, St. David's (Billow's), and 
after June, 1847, at Buffalo above Ickesburg. 

In the fall of 1845, at the first communion Rev. Knight held 
at Petersburg, there were tic enty -nine communicants. 

During the early part of 1846, a number of persons attended 
the catechetical lectures of the pastor, and on the 24th of May, 

1846, the following were received as members by confirmation, 
baptism, and certificate : 

Sylvanus H. Green, Elizabeth Custer (baptized), 

Franklin Garman, Eliza Majer, " 

Margaret J. Black, Ann C. Ashton, " 

Rebecca Milliken, Susan Ashton, " 

Eliza A. Hiltner, Philip Bierbower, by certificate, 

Elizabeth Wilkinson, William B. Irvine, " 

Susan Souder, Catharine Harper, " 

The names of John C. West, Mary Bossier, and Mary Hinkel 
appear also now for the first time on the list of members. The 
Lord was evidently blessing the labors of his servant, and much 
good was effected. 

In September, 1846, at Synod, Rev. Knight reported 6 congre- 
gations, 52 infant and 8 adult baptisms, 26 confirmations, and 241 
communicants. Thus the number of members in the charge was 



CHAPTER IV. 223 

On the 18th of October, 1846, the following persons were re- 
ceived to membership at Petersburg : 

Edwin Mager by confirmation, and John Custer by baptism. 

During the early part of 1847, others were found willing to at- 
tend lectures on the Catechism, and on the 25th of April, 1847, 
the following persons were confirmed, baptized, and received by 
certificate : 

Joseph B. Hall (baptized), Hannah Torbert (confirmed), 

Lewis Y. Michener, " Mary S. Ziegler, '^ 

Amelia Straley, " Amanda Steel, by application, 

Rebecca Leedy, " James Hoffman, by certificate, 

Lydia A. Black (confirmed), Susan Hofi'man, " 

On the 21st of November, 1847, Catharine Ash ton was con- 
firmed, and Eliza Rumbaugh baptized; and on the 6th of May, 
1848, Catharine Hofi'man was received by certificate, and on the 
18th of June following Eliza Werner was confirmed. 

In September, 1848, Mr. A. Billow represented the charge as 
delegate to Synod, held at East Berlin, Adams County, Pa. 

In June, 1849, Rev. Knight resigned, having served this con- 
gregation three years and a half. During this time the member- 
ship of the congregation increased considerably in number ; but 
as the charge was so large, it was utterly impossible for the pastor 
to devote to any one congregation that undivided attention and 
labor which were necessary to build it up eff'ectually. Still, much 
more was accomplished than could be expected. 

Rev. Jacob Martin 

commenced his pastoral labors here in July, 1849. For one year 
Rev. Martin preached to the same congregations Rev. Knight did 
before him. At a convention held at Bloomfield in February, 
1850 (see pp. 52-54), the Petersburg charge was first properly 
formed, and has since consisted of the following congregations, 
viz. : Petersburg, Mount Pisgah, Mount Zion in Fishing Creek 
Valley, St. David's or Billow's, and New Buffalo on the Susque- 
hanna River. Rev. Martin continued, however, to preach to these 



224 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

congregations for some months after the charge was formed, that 
is, till the close of the current pastoral year, on the 1st of July, 
1850, when he resigned them. 

During the winter and spring of 1850, Rev. Martin instructed 
a class of catechumens at Petersburg, and on the 5th of May, 
1850, the following persons were confirmed : 

James Martin, Daniel Hafer, Elizabeth Hafer, 

Thomas Branyan, Maria Martin, Sarah Brown. 

According to the division of the charge above referred to, after 
having preached here one year. Rev. Martin resigned in June, 
1850, and thus opened the way for the Petersburg charge, as now 
constituted, to call a pastor. After being vacant about five 
months, the charge was supplied in November, 1850, by the 

Rev. John P. Hiester, 

who preached regularly once every two weeks at Petersburg, 
Mount Pisgah, and St. David's or Billow's. At Mount Zion or 
Fishing Creek, some of the members were dissatisfied because. 
Rev. Hiester could not preach for them in the German language; 
hence he did not preach regularly there during the first year he 
was pastor of the charge. At New Buffalo he preached but 
seldom, if any at all. He resided at Petersburg. From all we 
can learn he did not succeed very well in the charge, though he 
is said to have been a good man. 

In September, 1851, Mr. Edwin Mager, as delegate of the 
charge, attended Synod at Newville, Cumberland County, Pa. 

On the 24th of January, 1852, at Petersburg, Nancy Jane 
Black was confirmed and Mrs. Susan King was received as a 
member by certificate, and on the 9th of August, the same year, 
Mary Greek was received by baptism. 

In September, 1852, Mr. D. Ensminger, Sen., as delegate, re- 
presented the charge in Synod, held at Mechanicsburg, Cumber- 
land County, Pa. Synod appropriated §50 towards the support of 
the pastor in charge for the ensuing year. 



CHAPTER IV. 225 

On the lltli of June, 1853, the following persons were con- 
firmed at Petersburg : 

Susan Michener, Martha A. Michener, Mary Manmiller. 

In September, 1853, Mr. David Billow represented the charge 
at Synod, held at Lewistown, Pa. 

Having served the charge as pastor about three years. Rev. 
Hiester resigned in November, 1853, and removed to the State 
of Illinois. The charge was then vacant about six months. A 
call was extended to the 

Rev. George A. Nixdorff, 

which he accepted, and he entered on the discharge of his pas- 
toral labors in the charge in June, 1851. He resided at Peters- 
burg, and preached there every two weeks, at St. David's, Mount 
Zion, Mount Pisgah, and also occasionally at New Buffalo. On 
the 20th of August, 1854, he had communion at Petersburg the 
first time. What the number of members was at this time we 
have no means of knowing. 

In September, 1854, Mr. William Messinger, as delegate of the 
charge, attended Synod at Shrewsbury, York County, Pa. At 
this convention of Synod Rev. Nixdorff reported 4 congregations, 
10 infant baptisms, and 129 communicants. 

At the organization of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod of 
Central Pennsylvania, at Aaronsburg, Pa., in February, 1855, 
Mr. Jacob Ensminger represented the charge as lay delagate ; and 
at the first Annual Convention of that Synod at Mifflintown, Pa., 
in May, 1855, Mr. Philip Michener appeared as delegate of the 
charge. At this time Rev. Nixdorff reported 4 congregations, 5 
infant and 1 adult baptisms, 13 confirmations, and 160 communi- 
cant members. 

At the convention of Synod held at Mifflinburg, Union County, 
Pa., in May, 1856, Mr. William Messinger appeared as delegate 
of the charge, and Rev. Nixdorff reported 4 congregations, 11 
infant baptisms, 4 confirmations, and 165 communicants. 

In May, 1857, Mr. D. Ensminger appeared as delegate in 



226 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

Synod, held at Perryville, Juniata County, Pa., and Eev. Nixdorff 
reported 5 congregations (he preached now also at New Buffalo), 
14 infant and 1 adult baptisms, 5 confirmations, and 165 commu- 
nicants. 

On the 29th of November, 1857, Dr. Andrew J. Werner and 
Christian Galbach were confirmed. These, so far as the church- 
record shows anything, were the only persons admitted by Rev. 
Nixdorff to membership at Petersburg. Probably others were 
admitted, but their names were not recorded. 

When Synod convened at New Bloomfield in May, 1858, Mr. 
J. Souder, as delegate, represented the Petersburg charge, and 
Rev. Nixdorff reported 5 congregations, 20 infant and 1 adult 
baptisms, 12 confirmations, and 165 communicants. 

Having served the charge as pastor about four years. Rev. Nix- 
dorff resigned it in May, 1858. During these four years he ad- 
mitted to full membership 3 persons by baptism and 34 by confir- 
mation. Although he had not the pleasure of seeing much of the 
fruit of his labors, and had apparently much reason to be discou- 
raged, still we have good ground for believing that he sowed much 
of the seed of the word now springing up and bearing an ample 
harvest, and that the time will surely come when he that sowed 
sorrowing and he that now reaps rejoicing shall both rejoice alike 
together on the great day of ingathering. 

After the charge had been vacant about four months, the present 
pastor, the 

Rev. William H. Diven, 

accepted a call, and on the 22d of August, 1858, commenced his 
labors as pastor of the charge. Much hard labor and self-denial 
were required to make the charge self-sustaining. Rev. Diven 
entered on the discharge of his pastoi'al duties with energy and 
prosecuted them with untiring zeal, and, God blessing his labors, 
he succeeded in leading many precious souls to Christ and in build- 
ing up the charge on a solid basis, so that it does now with ease 
sustain its pastor well. 

The members at Petersburo; had become somewhat scattered 



CHAPTER IV. 227 

and discouraged, so that it was necessary to start anew, — a new 
life had to be infused into the congregatioa and the members 
aroused from their lethargy. Under the approving smiles of 
Heaven, Rev. Diven succeeded to a good degree in the accomplish- 
ment of these ends. 

On the 26th of March, 1859, the following persons were con- 
firmed : 

John Fie, Susan Philips, 

Sarah A. Keel, Rebecca Keiser (baptized), 

and on Sunday, the 27th, being the first communion Rev. Diven 
held here, forty persons communed, which was at this time the 
entire or nearly the entire membership of the congregation. Of 
these forty members, thirty-tico were females, who are, if pious, 
generally first in every good cause, and without whose active co- 
operation this congregation could not have sustained itself much 
longer. They deserve much praise for their attachment to the 
Church, and their aid and influence in advancing the glorious 
cause of the Redeemer. 

In May, 185P, Rev. Diven reported at Synod, held at Mifflin- 
burg, Union County, Pa., 4 congregations and New Buffalo as a 
preaching-station, 7 infant and 2 adult baptisms, 9 confirmations, 
and 151 communicants. 

During the latter part of 1859 and the beginning of 1860, the 
congregation was blessed with an extensive revival of religion. 
Never before did this congregation enjoy such a precious season 
of grace from on high. The word was daily and faithfully 
preached by the pastor, and meetings for anxious inquirers were 
continued for some weeks. Many, both old and young, asked, 
" What must we do to be saved ?" They were pointed to Jesus 
as their only Savior. Among these were old members, and many 
belonged to no church. Parents and children were often at the 
same time seeking peace through Jesus Christ. These converts 
were carefully instructed by the pastor, and on the 5th of Feb- 
ruary, 18G0, the following persons were confirmed and baptized : 



228 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

Lawrence Gross, Susan Collier, 

Thomas Black, Malinda Noss, 

Charles F. Green, Margaret Ziegler, 

Andrew J. Jones, Eli Branyan (baptized), 

Jacob Keel, William Pressly, " 

, David L. McKenzie, James McLaughlin, '' 

Alexander Mahaflfey, Sarah E. Collier, " 

John T. Mahaffey, Mary McCannah, " 

George Parson, Delilah Roth, " 

John Spahr, Catharine Roth, " 

Jenny E. Branyan, Sarah A. StouiFer, " 

Leah Gross, Mary Wait, " 

Rachel A. Hess, Eleanor Roth, by application. 

On the 11th of March, 1860, Abram Hess and Miss Catharine 
McKenzie were confirmed. 

By this accession of members the congregation was very much 
encouraged and strengthened, and may now be said to be in a 
prosperous condition. May the Lord have all the praise ! and 
may all prove faithful ! 

In May, .1860, the sixth annual Convention of the Synod of 
Central Pennsylcania was held at Petersburg, when Mr. Samuel 
Noss represented the charge as delegate, and when Rev. Diven 
reported 4 congregations and New Buffalo as a preaching-station, 
22 infant and 15 adult baptisms, 38 confirmations, and 187 com- 
municant members. 

On the 10th of February, 1861, the following persons were 
confirmed : 

Alexander Manning, Mary Pressley, 

Mrs. Rebecca Shatto, Rebecca Shry (baptized). 

Sarah Moser, 

Mr. John Adams, as delegate of the charge, attended Synod in 
May, 1831, at Belleville, Mifflin County, Pa., when Rev. Diven 
reported 5 congregations, 10 infant and 3 adult baptisms, 12 con- 
firmations, and 196 communicants. 

On the 10th of March, 1862, Mrs. McCannah was received by 



CHAPTER IV. 



229 



baptism. In May, 1862, Mr. William Messinger represented the 
charge in Sjnod, at Selin.sgrove, Pa. 

The weekly prayer-meeting and Sunday-school of the congre- 
gation at Petersburg are generally well attended, and the benevo- 
lent operations of the Church meet a hearty response on the part 
of the members. 

By request we will conclude this sketch by adding a list of the 
members of Christ's Church at Petersburg at this time, June 1st, 
1862: 



Dr. Philip Ebert, 
Letitia Ebert, 
Philip Bierbower, 
Philip F. Michener, 
Jonathan Michener, 
Mary Michener, 
Susan Michener, 
Catharine Michener, 
Martha Michener, 
John Hiltner, 
Sarah Hiltner, 
Melvina Hiltner, 
Dr. Andrew J. Werner, 

Mrs. Werner, 

John Fie, 
Nicholas Jones, 
Hannah B. Jones, 
Jane Jones, 
Samuel Noss, 
Malinda Noss, 
Jesse White, 
Maria White, 
John Roth, 
Catharine Roth, 
Catharine Roth, 
Delilah Roth, 



Sarah Gamber, 
James McLaughlin, 
Susan McLaughlin, 
Christian Gelbach, 
Christiana Gelbach, 
Mary A. Moses, 
Lawrence Gross, 
Anna M. Gross, 
Leah Gross, 
Elizabeth Keel, 
Sarah A. Keel, 
Abram Hess, 
Rachel A. Hess, 
Elizabeth Wilkinson, 
Mary Bosler, 
Eliza Fritz, 
Mary Greek, 
Eli Branyan, 
Letitia Branyan, 
Charles F. Green, 
John Spahr, 
Mary McCannah, 
Susan Collier, 
Mary Wait, 
Sarah A, Stouffer, 
Rebecca Shatto, 



20 



230 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

Thomas Black, Sarah Moser, 

Margaret Black, Mary Pressley, 

Lydia Black, Rebecca Shry, 

Eliza A. Keiser, Alexander Manning, 

Rebecca Keiser, Susan Philips, 

Susan King, Mrs. McCannah. 

Eliza Rumbaugh, 

Owing to the peculiar circumstances and surroundings of the 
place, the membership of this congregation is constantly changing 
more or less. Some come to the place every year and others re- 
move. 

"Near to each other and to thee, 
Lord, bring us all in unity ; 
pour thy Spirit from on high, 
And all our num'rous wants supply. 

" show that in our low estate 
No blessing for us is too great ; 
We plead thy Son, we plead thy word, 
Founder, Patron, bounteous Lord I" 



SECTION II. 

MOUNT ZION CHURCH IN FISHING CREEK VALLEY, RYE TOWNSHIP. 

Some of the earliest settlers in Fishing Creek Valley were 
Lutherans, and many of their descendants still form a large portion 
of the population of Rye Township. As early as 1763, John 
Rankin located land ''at Candennan's Gap in Kittatiny Hill j" 
Israel Jacobs settled on Fishing Creek in 1766, and John Jacobs 
in 1768 ; Adam Reigart in 1773, and Samuel Starr, " on the 
waters of Fishing Creek," in 1774, and George Albright ( German, 
Albrecht) located land in 1786. These pioneer settlers were soon 
joined by others from the eastern counties and Cumberland Valley, 
among whom were the Reibers ( German, Raubers) in 1790, the 



CHAPTER IV. 231 

Foulks (Volks) in 1795, the Ensmingers in 1797, and then the 
Sloops, Finicles, Kimmels, Hinkels, Billows (^German, Billoch), 
and a number of others. These all settled on Fishing Creek, 
along Sherman's Creek, and in Pisgah Valley, so that at the 
beginning of the present century a considerable number of Luthe- 
ran families was scattered through that region over an extended 
territory on the northwest of the North Mountain. Before they 
had a church in their midst, these members attended preaching 
at Carlisle, a distance from ten to fifteen miles, by a rugged path 
over the North Mountain. Rev. John G. Butler was pastor of 
the Lutheran Church at Carlisle from 1780 to 1788, and it is 
thought that he occasionally visited and preached for the scat- 
tered members on this side of the mountain, especially so as their 
number was considerable, and he was noted for looking up the 
destitute members of the Church. Rev. Butler resigned at Car- 
lisle in 1788, and in 1790 the congregation at Loysville secured 
as pastor, the 

Rev. John Timothy Kiihl, 

who preached statedly for " the Grermans in Sherman's Valley," 
and occasionally, if not regularly, also for the members " on the 
waters of Fishing Creek," until 1796, when he left Sherman's 
Valley. 

Rev. John Herhst 

pastor of the church at Carlisle, in 1797, commenced to preach 
at Loysville regularly once every four weeks. On his way to and 
from Loysville he usually stopped with the members on Fishing 
Creek and preached for them. In 1801, Rev. Herbst resigned 
at Carlisle, and in 1802 he was succeeded there by 

Rev. Frederick Sanno, 

who, from 1802 to 1809, on his way to and from Loysville, 
preached frequently in Fishing Creek Valley. Some of the aged 
members still remember his preaching, and, also, that he in- 
structed a class of catechumens, whom he confirmed in Mr. Philip 
Foulk's bam, where he had communion at the same time. When 

f 



232 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

this was, and whom he confirmed, cannot be remembered. It 
was probably in 1808 or 1809. In winter he preached in private 
dwellings, and in summer in barns and sometimes in the woods. 
On such occasions the members all around from six to ten miles 
assembled to hear the word of life. I^xcepting the single in- 
stance just referred to, the young people always went to Carlisle 
to attend catechetical instruction, and so did the members on oc- 
casions of communion. On their way to and from Carlisle, they 
crossed the North Mountain at Sterrett's Gap. In those days the 
people were surely willing to deny themselves in order to hear the 
word of God. Who in Sherman's Valley would now walk ten or 
fifteen miles over a high and rugged mountain to hear the Gospel 
preached ? Carriages and the means of easy and speedy convey- 
ance were then unknown, and if they had been known, they would 
have been useless, as the mountain was crossed by a narrow path, 
leading over high rocks and deep gorges. In 1809, Rev. Sanno 
ceased to preach in Sherman's Valley, and then the 

Rev. John Frederick Osterloh 

took charge of the congregations in said valley. He resided in 
Saville Township on a small tract of land of his own, but now 
belonging to Mr. Henry Flcisher. At Fishing Creek he preached 
regularly once every four weeks, in summer usually in Mr. Kim- 
mel's barn, and in winter at diiferent places in private dwellings 
and school-huusos. He preached also about six miles west of 
Fishing Creek neighborhood at Reiber's church or school-house 
on Sherman's Creek. This church or school-house (for it was 
used for both purposes), now in Carroll Township, was built by 
the early settlers. It stands yet, an ancient-looking structure, 
and a large graveyard adjoins it. 

In June, 1811, as delegate of the charge, Mr. C Geiger of the 
Fishing Creek congregation accompanied Rev. Osterloh to Synod, 
then held at Philadelphia. 

When this congregation was regularly organized does not ap- 
pear ; it is however highly probable, from all we can learn, that 
it was about the year 1811. 



CHAPTER IV. 233 

In the spring of 1813, at Reiber's church or school-house, Eev. 
Osterloh confirmed the following class of catechumens — the only 
class he confirmed among this people : 

Philip Hinkel, Miss Margaret Kimmel, 

George Hinkel, " Barbara Kimmel, 

John Shearer, " Susan Shearer, 

John Reiber, " Elizabeth Jacobs, 

Matthias Finicle, " Susan Jacobs, 

Mrs. Mary Finicle, " Elizabeth Reiber, 

Miss Susan Ensminger, " Catharine Losh.* 
" Catharine Kimmel, 

The members were scattered over an extensive territory, and 
were therefore easily beguiled by the influence of straggling 
preachers. Hence, from the minutes of Synod, June, 1813, we 
learn that a letter was addressed to Synod ''by a part of the con- 
gregation in Rye Township, Cumberland (now Perry) County, in 
which the signers state that they have employed Mr. Gr. Preissler 
as their preacher, and they pray therefore that he may be received 
as a member of this Ministerium." Thus the spirit of schism 
was rife among the members in Fishing Creek Valley. '' In re- 
gard to Mr. Preissler, it was, on motion, Resolved, That the 
Ministerium can at present have nothing to do with him, and that 
the President, in the name of the Ministerium, fraternally ad- 
monish him to cease exercising the functions of the ministry." 
It seems Mr. Preissler alienated a part of the congregation by in- 
truding himself as a minister. Such self-constituted preachers 
have always done mischief. Who, and what Mr. Preissler was, 
we do not know. No doubt Synod had good reasons for the 
action it took in his case. 

In the summer of 1815, Rev. Osterloh resigned his congrega- 
tions in Sherman's Valley, and moved to Cumberland Valley. 

* For these names we are indebted to Mrs. Susan Billow, whose maiden 
name was Ensminger, and who is the only survivor of the fifteen catechumens 
that were then confirmed. She is a truly pious mother in Israel. 

20* 



234 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

The Fishing Creek congregation was then vacant. In June, 
1816, a petition from this congregation was read before Synod, 
praying that body to send them a minister. On motion, Synod 
" Resolved, That the pastor of Carlisle be requested to serve this 
congregation." Thus the congregation was again attached to 
Carlisle and served from thence. 

Rev. Benjamin Keller 

was then pastor of the Lutheran Church at Carlisle, and, in ac- 
cordance with the resolution of Synod, at once commenced to 
preach for the congregation in Fishing Creek Valley. He labored 
with great zeal, and encouraging success attended his pious efforts 
to do good. Among the first things this indefatigable and faithful 
minister of Christ did, was to collect the youth for catechetical 
instruction and to make arrangements for the erection of a suitable 
house of worship. In the Lutheran Observer, August 14th, 
1857, he says: "I preached every fourth Sunday afternoon in 
Sherman's Valley (crossing at Sterrett's Gap), in the second story 
of a new log house, belonging to a Mr. George Albrecht (now 
written Albright), until we had a church built, which was conse- 
crated by the Rev. George Lochman, D.D., then pastor of the 
Lutheran congregation at Harrisburg. After the church was 
built and consecrated, I gave it up to the Rev. J. W. Heim." 

The corner-jStone of this church was laid some time in July, 
1816 ; but we cannot ascertain who the building-committee were, 
or who the ministers were in attendance on this occasion. About 
ten years ago, by some 'Mewd fellows of the baser sort," this 
corner-stone was forced out and robbed of its contents — a few 
coins, books and documents. We have found no traces of a con- 
gregational constitution. Probably none was adopted. The 
church-edifice was speedily erected and completed, and on Sun- 
day, the 14th day of August, 1816, it was consecrated with ap- 
propriate ceremonies and received the distinctive title, 3Iottnt 
Zion Church. The Rev. Dr. Lochman preached the dedicatory 
sermon and consecrated the church. The edifice was built of 
hewed logs, and is about thirty-five feet by forty in size. It was 



CHAPTER IV. 235 

a high structure, and had inside high galleries on three sides, and 
a high pulpit against the wall. A few years ago the building was 
lowered, the galleries were removed, the pulpit was rebuilt, and 
in all respects the internal arrangement of the church was rendered 
more convenient and comfortable than it had been before. The 
church is located in Fishing Creek Valley, Rye Township, 

At this time (1816), and for a number of years after, the 
Church-Council consisted of the following persons : 

Christian Ensminger, ) Anthony Kimmel, ) 

Philip Foulk, \ Elders, p.^ev Foulk, \ Deacons. 

Under the efEcient labors of Rev. Keller the congregation re- 
vived and attained a high degree of prosperity. He was beloved 
by the people, and his eiforts to do them good were appreciated 
by them and blessed of God. But we need not proclaim his 
praise; the large number of accessions to the congregation, under 
his ministry, speaks more effectually than anything we can say. 

Soon after he had taken charge of the congregation, Rev. 
Keller commenced instructing a large class of catechumens in the 
Catechism of the Church, and at the first communion he held 
here, on Sunday, the 10th of November, 1816, the following 

thirty-five persons were confirmed : 

# 

John Reibei', Maria Shade, 

Daniel Ensminger, Elizabeth Shade, 

John Kimmel, Catharine Bender, 

Conrad Hiiikel, Barbara Finicle, 

David Shade, Lydia Billow, 

George Shade, Anna Foulk, 

Henry Bender, Elizabeth Foulk, 

John Foulk, Maria Musser, 

Solomon Finicle, Margaret Yoh, 

John Shade, Catharine Richter, 

William Messinger, Catharine Schlang, 

Jacob Messinger, Barbara Jacobs, 

Solomon Schlang, Maria Gamber, 



236 



CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 



William Musser, 
Heni7 Bradley, 
John Jacobs, 
Elizabeth Ensiuingor, 
Catharine Foulk, 

On the same day, witli the above 
thirty-six members communed : 

Christian Ensminger, 
Regina Ensminger, 
Anthony Kimmel, 
Barbara Kimmel, 
Bernhardt Schlang, 
Justina Schlang, 
Philip Foulk, 
Eve Foulk, 
Philip Kimmel, 
Peter Kimmel, 
Catharine Kimmel, 
Barbara Kimmel, 
Anna M. Reiber, 
Anna M. Reiber, 
Magdalene CornrJtan, 
Peter Finicle, 
Elizabeth Finicle, 
William Messin<rer, Sen., 



Catharine Stlhrin, 
Anna Shade, 
Maria Bradley, 
Susan Bender, 



catechumens, the following 

Henry Jacobs, 
Maria Jacobs, 
Elizabeth Jacobs, 
Susan Jacobs, 
John Richter, 
Susan Myers, 
John Ensminger, 
David Ensminger, 
George Billow, 
Susan Billow, 
Peter Foulk, 
Catharine Foulk, 
John Focht, 
IMargaret Billow, 
IMargaret Swartz, 
Catharine Souder, 
Susan Heckendorn, 
Elizabeth Albrisrht. 



In all seventy-one members communed, being about the nume- 
rical strength of the congregation at that time. Nearly all whose 
names are given above have since gone to the eternal world. 

The first person buried in the graveyard at Mount Zion Church 
was John Stoufer, on the 20th of May, 1820, aged fifteen years 
and fifteen days. 

As Rev. Keller's charge was very large^ he preached here only 
once every four weeks, usually on Sunday afternoon. On such 
occasions the members came together from a great distance all 
ai'ouud, and seemed to appreciate the preached Gospel very highly. 



CHAPTER IV. 237 

Nearly four years had now passed away, when Rev. Keller met 
and instructed another large class of catechumens in the doctrines 
of our holy religion. This was the last class he instructed here. 
On Monday, the 22d of May, 1820, when the Lord's Supper was 
also administered, the following thirty-two persons were confirmed: 

Abram Jacobs, Anna M. Ensminger, 

John Miller, Salome Richter, 

Peter Foulk, Maria Richter, 

Samuel Foulk, Margaret Losh, 

John Foulk, Elizabeth Losh, 

Joseph Bender, Elizabeth Kimmel, 

Isaac Shade, 3Iana Stankey, 

Abram Jacobs, Susan Messinger, 

George Jacobs, Sarah Messinger, 

David Reiber, Margaret Messinger, 

George Reiber, Catharine Miller, 

George Bender, Elizabeth Miller, 

Martin Swartz, Magdalene Billow, 

George Nevinger, Susan Foulk, 

John Stankey, Susan Finicle, 

Barbara Ensminger, Julia A. Fair, 

At this time (1820), deducting removals by death, letter, &c., 
the whole number of communing members was dghfy-three. The 
congregation seems to have been in a flourishing condition. Rev. 
Keller served this congregation as pastor till he resigned at Car- 
lisle, late in the fall of 1827, and in February, 1828, he took 
charge of the Lutheran congregation at Germantown, Pa. Be- 
sides those whose names are given above, we do not find that he 
confirmed any others here. Whilst pastor he preached to this 
congregation exclusively in the German language. It appears 
that in the spring of 1829, the 

Rev. L. H. Meyer 

took charge of this congregation and served it with great accept- 
ance for about one year. We have not been able to learn why 
Rev. Meyer served this congregation only so short a time, or with 



238 



CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 



what other congregations he served it in Cumberland County. 
Our impression is that he served it only as a temporary supply. 
The aged membei's speak of him with affection and the highest 
terras of regard, and regret sincei-ely that he left them so soon. 
Immediately after Rev. Meyer had resigned, in the spring of 
1829, the 

Rev. John William Heim 

of Loysville took charge of the congregation and served it as 
pastor, in connection with his other congregations in Perry 
County, until he was called to the eternal world, in December, 
1849. This indefatigable herald of the Cross labored in this con- 
gregation with great acceptance and success, and the number of 
accessions, under his ministry, to the membership was large. 
Soon after he had become pastor of the congregation, he met and 
instructed a class of catechumens in the Catechism, and when he 
held the first communion here, on Sunday, the 30th of August, 
1829, the following /or/y-OHe persons were confirmed : 



Francis Mickey, 
Joseph Ensminger, 
John Finicle, 
Joseph Foulk, 
David Sloop, 
Jacob Billow, 
Baltzer Beistlein, 
Henry Gamber, 
William Davis, 
John Shade, 
"William Sloop, 
Conrad Fair, 
Nehemiah Reed, 
Jacob Hair, 
Levi Hair, 
Peter Hair, 
Joseph Hair, 
John Hair, 



Anna M. Hair, 
Catharine Fair, ■ 
Susan Stouffer, 
Catharine Bowman, 
Sarah Sailer, 
Margaret Sailer, 
Sarah Spahr, 
Eliza Mickey, 
Mary A. Mickey, 
Rosanna Ensminger, 
Sarah Foulk, 
Elizabeth Billow, 
Sarah Smeigh, 
Sarah Mahaffey, 
Elizabeth Roth, 
Elizabeth Shade, 
Elizabeth Souder, 
Elizabeth McCord, 



CHAPTER IV, 239 

David Smeigh, Elizabeth Finicle, 

William Smeigh, Rebecca Finicle. 

George Smeigh, 

At this time the congregation numbered one hundred and six- 
teen members. Daniel Yoh was Ulder and David Shade Deacon. 

Rev. Heim catechized here once every four or five years, and 
as the congregation at that time embraced a large territory, the 
number of catechumens was usually large. On Sunday, the 25th 
of May, 1834, the following twenti/ -three persons were confirmed : 

Abram Jacobs, Catharine Hauk, 

John Sloop, Susan Hair, 

William Ensminger, Elizabeth Hair, 

Benjamin Finicle, Maria Kunkel, 

John Finicle, Elizabeth Souder, 

Jacob Fair, Maria Dunkelberger, 

William Hair, Sarah Finicle, 

Thomas Hair, Elizabeth Foulk, 

Daniel Low, Hannah Foulk, 

Martin Swartz, Susan Mickey, 

John Dunkelberger, Charity Richter. 
John Kunkel, 

The whole number of communicants was at this time eighty- 
eight. This was, however, by no means the whole number of 
members. Rev. Heim's labors were signally crowned with God's 
blessing. He could not but be encouraged to prosecute his call- 
ing with joy and holy delight, when everywhere so many were 
found willing to unite themselves with God's people. 

Having been for half a year carefully instructed in the doc- 
trines of the Christian faith, on Sunday, the 22d of April, 1838, 
the following twenty-six catechumens were confirmed : 

George Finicle, Elizabeth Messinger, 

John Finicle, Maria Shade, 

Henry Finicle, Elizabeth Foulk, 



240 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS, 

Solomon Low, Maria Foulk, 

George Shade, Margaret Jacobs, 

Jacob Shade, Catharine Meyer, 

David Sidel, Louisa Meyer, 

Daniel Jacobs, Susan Sloop, 

Henry Leppert, Elizabeth Sloop, 

Hannah Sidel, Maria Yoh, 

Catharine Souder, Magdalene Wick, 

Frances Low, Elizabeth Reed, 

Maria Messinger, Mary A. Reed. 

So far as the increase of members was concerned, the congre- 
gation was evidently in a prosperous condition. What the state 
of piety was we are not informed. We must suppose, however, 
that the preaching of the word was not without effect. In his 
preaching and catechetical lectures, Rev. Heim sought to do im- 
mortal souls good. A few years had again passed away, when a 
large number were found willing to attend lectures on the Cate- 
chism, and on Sunday, the 18th of April, 1841, the following 
twenty-seven persons were confirmed : 

Daniel Jacobs, Sarah Finicle, 

Christian Finicle, Anna M. Noss, 

William Finicle, Susan Noss, 

Henry Ensminger, Rachel Billow, 

David Ensminger, Sarah Foulk, 

Adam Billow, Hannah Foulk, 

John Yoh, Mary A. Messinger, 

Daniel Sweger, Sarah Jacobs, 

Jacob Reed, Mary A. Sloop, 

George Yoh, Catharine Sloop, 

Solomon Yoh, Margaret Fair, 

David Yoh, Catharine Hair, 

Samuel Noss, Maria Reed. 
Henry Koup, 

At this time the number of communicants was one hundred 
and eleven. The congregation had hitherto been constantly in- 



CHAPTER IV. 241 

creasing by large accessions to the membership. But about this 
time the want of preaching in the English language began to be 
deeply felt. Hence, some of the members united in forming 
Mount Pisgah congregation, about five miles west of Mount Zion 
Church. The Rev. John Ulrich of Carlisle organized Mount 
Pisgah congregation in 1839, and preached to it in the English 
language. Thus a large number of members were drawn off 
from Mount Zion congregation. Rev. Heim, however, continued 
his labors with success, and on Sunday, the 13th of April, 1845, 
the following twenty-four persons were confirmed : 

David Billow, Susan Billow, 

George Mickey, Regina Ensminger, 

John Souder, Caroline Ensminger, 

John Sweger, Mary A. Ensminger, 

Samuel Sweger, Maria Jacobs, 

Jacob Mickey, Rebecca Hartman, 

William Finicle, Elizabeth Siesholtz, 

George Messinger, Christiana Hair, 

David Messinger, Susan Hair, 

David Shade, Maria Light, 

William Reed, Anna M. Gamber, 

Anna Foulk, Elizabeth Gamber. 

In June, 1846, the St. David's or Billow's congregation was 
organized by Rev. Lloyd Knight, about four or five miles north of 
Mount Zion Church, to which most of the members of the new 
organization had belonged. Thus, Mount Zion congregation was 
considerably reduced in numbers by the organization of Mount 
Pisgah in 1839 and of St. David's in 1846. In the fall of 1846, 
Rev. Heim met another class of catechumens for instruction in 
the Catechism, and on Wednesday, the 6th of January, 1847, the 
following twelve persons were confirmed : 

Levi Sweger, Susan Reed, 

William Finicle, Susan Albright, 

William Ensminger, Sarah Noss, 
21 



242 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

Solomon Ensminger, Regina Gamber, 

Julian IMickej, Barbara Fleisher, 

Catharine Smeigh, ' Hannah Messinger. 

This was the last class of catechumens Rev. Heim confirmed 
at Mount Zion Church. He continued, however, to preach here 
till he was removed by the hand of death in December, 1849. 
He was pastor of the congregation nearly twenty-one years, during 
which time he confirmed at this place one hundred and Jiffy-tliree 
persons. He preached exclusively in the German language and 
opposed the introduction of the English. Hence the formation, 
in part at least, of two congregations, one north and the other 
west of Mount Zion ; and hence, too, the reason why Mount 
Zion congregation is not now what it might be, and what it once 
was in point of numerical strength. 

At the formation of the Petersburg charge, in February, 1850, 
by the convention of delegates held at Bloomfield (see pp. .52-54), 
the Mount Zion congregation was attached to said charge. After 
Father Heim's death, the congregation had no preaching for 
about ten months. In November, 1850, the 

Rev. John P. Hiester 

accepted a call from the Petersburg charge, and commenced to 
preach at Mount Zion ; but as he could not preach in the German 
language, the German-speaking portion of the congregation be- 
came dissatisfied and were on the point of seceding from the 
charge in order to get preaching in their own language. In Sep- 
tember, 1851, the congregation sent Mr. Messinger, as commis- 
sioner, to Synod, in order to secure German preaching for the 
congregation, or permission for it to withdraw from the charge or 
to call another man. After considerable discussion of the subject 
in question, it was by Synod 

" Resolved, That the Fishing Creek church be recommended to 
remain in the charge of Brother Hiester, and that he use his en- 
deavors to procure the aid of his neighboring clerical brethren to 
supply them as frequently as possible with German services." 



CHAPTER IV. 243 

For the want of German preaching and from other causes, as 
well as the formation of the two congregations referred to above, 
the Mount Zion congregation had dwindled down very much in 
the number of members, so that when Rev. Hiester held commu- 
nion here the first time there were only forty communicants. 

During the summer of 1852, a number of persons attended the 
catechetical lectures of the pastor, and on the 11th of August, 
1852, the following were confirmed : 

John Fleisher, Catharine A. Ensminger, 

George Reed, Sarah Messinger, 

William Reed, Sarah Reed, 

Simon Finicle, Elizabeth Fleisher, 

John Gamber, Jane Hartman. 

These were the only persons, so far as we can learn, who were 
confirmed whilst Rev. Hiester was pastor of the congregation. At 
Synod in September, 1852, Rev. Hiester reported "that he had 
made efibrts, but unsuccessfully, to secure German preaching for 
Fishing Creek Church." Thus the wants of the German part of 
the congregation remained unsupplied, and more or less dissatis- 
faction was continued by them. It is to be regretted that they 
were not supplied, at least for some time, with preaching in their 
own language. The transition from all German to all English 
was too abrupt and complete for the congregation, and, as might 
be expected, called forth strenuous opposition and much dissatis- 
faction. Only time can reconcile the Germans to English 
preaching. Having served the congregation as pastor about 
three years. Rev. Hiester resigned in November, 1853. The 
charge was then vacant about six months. A call was then ex- 
tended to the 

Rev. George A. Nixdorff 

and accepted by him, and he commenced his pastoral labors here 
in June, 1854. He held the first communion here on the 22d 
of April, 1855, when the following twelve persons were confirmed : 



244 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

George Ensminger, Isabella Ensminger, 

David Sloop, Elizabeth Ensminger, 

Jacob Hartman, Sarah Reed, 

David Gamber, Rachel A. Reed, 

William Flei.'^her, Rebecca Fiuicle, 

George Snell, Susan Messinger. 

At this time (1855) the Church-Council consisted of John 
Sweger, Elder, and George Messinger and William Ensminger, 
Deacons. On the 19th of April, 1857, Moses Waugh was con- 
firmed. 

Rev. Nixdorff resigned in May, 1858, having served the con- 
gregation as pastor about four years, A call was then extended 
to the 

Rev. William H. Diven 

and accepted by him, and on the 22d of August of the same year 
he commenced his labors as pastor of this congregation. He 
preaches here once every two weeks. Some prejudice against 
English preaching is still entertained by some. In January, 
1859, the following persons were confirmed : 

William Ensminger, James White, Nancy Kleckler, 
George Albright, Mary J. Grier, Magdalene Fiuicle. 

For want of documents, the above is the fullest sketch of the 
history of Mount Zion Cliurch and congregation that can be given. 
Since the death of Father Heim in December, 1849, no German 
has been preached here. It is hoped the congregation will gra- 
dually gain its former position as to number of members. 

At the desire of some friends of the church, we will conclude 
by subjoining a full list of the members of this congregation on 
the 1st of June, 1862. This list may be of interest to those who 
shall come after us. There diVe fifty-seven members, viz. : 

Daniel Ensminger, Barbara Messinger, 

Susan Ensminger, Susan H. Messinger, 

Joseph Ensminger, Barbara Messingei-, 



CHAPTER IV. 



245 



Elizabeth Ensraingcr, 
William Enstninger, Sen., 
William Ensminger, Jr., 
George Ensminger, 
Margaret Ensminger, 
Isabella Ensminger, 
Sarah J. Ensminger, 
Susan Ensminger, 
George Albright, 
E-osanna Albright, 
Elizabeth Albright, 
William Finicle, 
Elizabeth Finicle, 
Rebecca Finicle, 
Helena Finicle, 
Sophia Bensel, 
Henry Gamber, 
John Gamber, 
David Gamber, 
S. E. Gamber, 
Mary Gamber, 
Maria Gamber, 
Regina Gamber, 
Elizab^eth Gamber, 
William Messinger, 
Georse Messinger, 



Mary A. Messinger, 
John Reed, 
Hannah Reed, 
Susan Reed, 
Anna M. Reed, 
Sarah Reed, 
Daniel Comp, 
Daniel Sweger, 
Susan Sweger, 
John Sweger, 
Elizabeth Sweger, 
James White, 
Margaret White, 
Anne Grier, 
Mary J. Grier, 
Susan Fleisher, 
Barbara Fleisher, 
Sarah Smeigh, 
Jacob Smeigh, 
Peter Low, 
Elizabeth Hummel, 
Catharine A. Sloop, 
Elizabeth Noss, 
Susan Meyers, 
Catharine Sheriff. 



' Our souls, by love together knit, 

Cemented, mix'd in one, 
One hope, one heart, one mind, one voice, 
'Tis heav'n on earth begun." 



21* 



246 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

SECTION III. 

MOUNT PISGAH EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH IN CARROLL TOWNSHIP. 

This churcli is located in Carroll Township, on the southeast 
bank of Sherman's Creek, not far from Billow's Mill, on the site 
of what used to be known as " Sutch's School-house." This 
school-house was erected some time between 1775 and 1780. It 
was one among the earliest improved places in this region, and 
this was one of the first, if not the first, school-house in Pisgah 
Valley. A large graveyard is connected with it, and here the 
earliest settlers were buried.* 

A number of Lutheran families settled here along Sherman's 
Creek at the beginning of the present century. Some of these 
afterwards attended preaching at Mount Zion Church in Fishing 
Creek Valley, some at Carlisle, crossing the North Mountain at 
Sterrett's Gap, and some perhaps also at St. Peter's Church in 
Spring Township. They had preaching also occasionally at 
Keiber's school-house till about 1830. Those of the members 
who could not understand the German language were members 
at Carlisle ; but as it was from ten to fifteen miles to Carlisle, the 
pastor at that place came occasionally across the mountain and 
preached for the scattered members on this side. This gave rise 
to the Pisgah Lutheran congregation. The best information with 
regard to the origin and early progress of this congregation, with- 
in our reach, is given in a communication, dated October, 1860, 
to us, by the 

Rev. John Ulrich 

of CarliJile, the first pastor of the congregation, Rev. Ulrich says: 
" All the information I can give you will be from memory, 

* Reiber's {Gertnan, Rauber's) church or school-house, about two miles 
west of Sutch's and in Spriug Township, was built about the beginning of the 
present century. Here Rev. Messrs. Herbst, Sanno, Osterloh and Heim 
preached occasionally, and by some denominations it is still used as a preach- 
ing-place. See note on p. 44. 



CHAPTER IV. 247 

The early history of Mount Pisgah Church is about this : There 
lived in Pisgah Valley several families of the Lutheran Church. 
They were entirely ignorant of the German language, ai*! could 
therefore not profit by the preaching of Father Ileim. These fa- 
milies attended preaching at Carlisle, and were there regular 
members of the Lutheran Church. They had from ten to twelve 
miles to Carlisle ; they were, however, very punctual in their Sab- 
bath attendance. To these families, and for the benefit of their 
neighbors. Rev. Messrs. Keller and Heyer preached whilst they 
had the pastoral charge of the church at Carlisle. It may be 
that Rev. C. F. Schaeifer, D.D. (now Professor at Gettysburg), 
preached also occasionally for them ; but very seldom, if any. 
The others named, I know, did frequently preach for them, as I 
was told by different persons. After I had taken charge of the 
congregation at Carlisle, I visited these families as my predeces- 
sors had done, and preached for them on week-days during the 
first three years of my ministry here. When the children of these 
families had grown up, they found it very inconvenient to attend 
preaching at Carlisle, and hence they requested my Church-Coun- 
cil to allow me to organize them into a congregation and to preach 
regularly for them. This request was granted. The most pro- 
minent and active members of our Church, in Pisgah Valley, were 
Richard Adams, Joseph Egolf, and John Henderson. Mr. Adams 
was a true Israelite — one of the excellent of the earth. He was 
loved and respected by all who knew him. No man in that sec- 
tion of country had more influence as a Christian than he. In 
those days all looked up to him for counsel in spiritual matters. 
Others were indeed active ; but they had not the influence he 
had, as he was the oldest of the English-speaking members of our 
Church in the whole Valley. 

"In the year 1838, I commenced to preach for this people regu- 
larly every four weeks. My appointments were always on Friday 
evening and Saturday morning, except twice each year, when I 
preached on Sabbath and administered the Lord's Supper. Thus, 
I preached twice every time I visited them — once in the school- 
house near where the church now stands, and the other time in 



248 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

the Protestant Methodist Church further down the Valley. These 
Christian brethren very generously offered me the use of their 
churcli^ It was here, also, we usually celebrated the Lord's Sup- 
per, before we had a church of our own. 

" In December, 1839, 1 organized the congregation. A Church- 
Council was elected and installed, consisting of the following four 
members : 



j Elders. -^^^'P^^ ^S°^^' I Deacons. 

) John Losh, ) 



Richard Adams, | TT'.hlcv Joseph Egolf, 

John Henderson, 



" For three years I continued my four-week appointments at 
the above-named places. During that time this little congrega- 
tion enjoyed several special seasons of grace, which resulted in the 
hopeful conversion of a goodly number of persons, both old and 
young. When I organized the congregation there were only about 
ten or twelve members, who united with us. There were, annu- 
ally, considerable accessions by confirmation and certificate from 
other denominations. 

"In the year 1842, the present Mount Pisgah Church was 
built. I am not certain when the corner-stone was laid ; but if 
any was laid, it must have been in the spring of 1842. On Sun- 
day, the 2(3th of September, 1842, the church was consecrated. 
Rev. B. Kurtz, D.D., and Rev. B. Keller assisted on the occa- 
sion — it was at the time the West Penn.sylvania Synod was in 
session at New Bloomfield. The dedicatory sermon was preached 
by Rev. Keller, and the consecration services were performed by 
Rev. Dr. Kurtz. Mr. Adams was on the building-committee ; 
but who the other members of the committee were, I do not re- 
collect. Perhaps there was but one. I know Mr. Adams had the 
entire care of the erecting of the church, the raising of money, 
&c., in his hands. He spared neither time nor money to have the 
church erected and completed. It is a Lutheran church, though 
other denominations have the privilege to preach in it occasionally 
when not occupied by the Lutheran congregation. 

" At the time when the church was consecrated the member- 
ship of the congregation numbered about eujhti/ persons. A few 



CHAPTER IV. 249 

weeks after the dedication of the church, I resigned, and preached 
my last sermon on the 12th of November, 1842. During my 
ministry among this people there was union and harmony. My 
labors have perhaps nowhere been more signally blessed than 
among the people of this congregation." So far Rev. Ulrich's 
statement respecting the early history of the church. 

During the summer of 1839, Rev. Ulrich instructed a class of 
catechumens, and on the 8th of December, 1839, the following 
eight persons were confirmed : 

George Souder, Daniel Losh, 

John Souder, David Adams, 

Henry Souder, Catharine Souder, 

Jacob Brown, Elizabeth Adams. 

On the same day, being the first time Rev. Ulrich had com- 
munion here, the following members communed with the above 
eight persons : 

Richard Adams, John Losh, 

Jane Adams, John Henderson, 

Elizabeth Adams, David Fair, 

Joseph Adams, Elizabeth Fair, 

Elizabeth Adams, William Melister, 

Frances Adams, Bradley Henry, 

John Adams, Mary Stouifer, 

Mary E. Adams, Elizabeth Stouflfer, 

Joseph Egolf, Mary Shearer, 

Susan Egolf, Rebecca Lenhart, 

Christian Ziegler, Barbara Mickey, 

Mary Ziegler, Sarah Heckendorn. 

Thus at the first communion there were thirty-two members. 
On the 5th of December, 1840, John Finicle and Sarah Finicle, 
and perhaps some others, were received as members by applica- 
tion. 

During the early part of '41, the congregation was blessed with 



250 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

a precious season of refreshing from on high. A number were 
hopefully converted to God. These were for some time carefully 
instructed, and on the 27th of March, 1841, the following six 
persons were confirmed : 

Peter Slushcr, " John IMcClintock, 

John Jones, Martha Jones, 

Joseph Murphy, Sarah McClintock, 

and on the 20th of November, the same year, Margaret Shearer 
was confirmed. The congregation increased in number. 

The want of a suitable house of worship was deeply felt by all, 
and measures were taken to erect one. Among other places 
offered, it was thought best to locate the church near " Sutch's 
School-house," where there was an old and large graveyard, and 
where Rev. Ulrich had hitherto been preaching. The land 
belonged to Abraham Jacobs. From the deed of conveyance we 
transcribe the following extracts : 

" This Inrlenture was made on the 12th day of February, 1842, 
between Abraham Jacobs of the Township of Carroll, County of 
Perry, and State of Pennsylvania, and Catharine his wife, on the 
one part, and Richard Adams, John Henderson, and Joseph Egolf, 
of the Township, &c., . . . aforesaid, Trustees of the Evangelical 
Lutheran Church, and their successors in oflace, of the other part, 
Witnesseth that the aforesaid Abraham Jacobs and Catharine his 
wife, ... for the purpose of erecting a church at the place called 
Sutch's School-house, ... for the consideration of one dollar, . . . 
have granted, bargained, and sold . . . unto the said Trustees . . . 
a certain lot or piece of land, . . . containing one acre and thirty- 
two perches. . . . The graveyard is reserved to be used as hereto- 
fore as a graveyard free to all those who may choose to inter the 
dead in said graveyard. And further, said church may be used 
as a place of public worship by any denomination of Christians 
at any and all times when not occupied by said Evangelical 
Lutheran congregation, so that those who meet in said church do 
conduct themselves in a decent and Christian-like manner," &c. 
See Deed-Book, Letter I., p. 591. 



CHAPTER IV. 251 

During the winter and spring of '42 the Lord poured out his 
spirit copiously on the congregation, and many souls were awakened 
and professed conversion. The Kev. TJlrich diligently instructed 
for some time these subjects of this gracious work, and on the 1st 
of May, 1842, the following ^/i!een persons were confirmed : 

Jacob Adams, Philip Shearer, 

Samuel Adams, Benjamin Jones, 

William Adams, Kobert Jones, 

Levi Adams, Elizabeth Shearer, 

David Adams, Rebecca Jones, 

Michael G. Earhart, Frances Hackendorn, 

George W. Briner, Margaret Moore, 
John Shearer, 

and the following four persons were received as members by ap- 
plication, viz., John Souder, James McCrosky, Isabella McCrosky, 
and Leah Heckendorn. 

The new church-edifice was erected this summer. No corner- 
stone was laid. The building is frame, about thirty-five by forty 
feet in size. In the Lutlieran Ohserver of October 21, 1842, 
Eev. Dr. Kurtz gives the following notice of the dedication : '< A 
new church was dedicated to the service of God, in Perry County, 
Pa., on the 24th of September (1842), and received the name of 
Evangelical Lutheran Church of Mount Pisgah. The dedicatory 
sermon was preached by Rev. B. Keller of Gettysburg (and Rev. 
Dr. B. Kurtz performed the services of consecration). The 
church is frame, and though not grand is nevertheless quite a 
neat house of worship. If we recollect right, this congregation 
was only organized at the close of the year '39. It is in charge 
of Rev. Ulrich of Carlisle." 

The congregation had now a house of worship, and under the 
eflScient pastoral labors of Rev. Ulrich was in a prosperous con- 
dition ; but to the sincere and great regret of all, he resigned at 
Carlisle, and here preached his farewell sermon on the 12th of 
November, 1842. Soon after the resignation of Rev. Ulrich, the 



252 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

Rev. Jacob Kemjyfer 
of Carlisle took charge of the congregation, and served it about 
one year in connection with some congregations in Cumberland 
County. On the 7th of May, 1843, Jacob Cornman and Elizabeth 
Cornman were confirmed, and the names of the following persons 
appear for the first time in the list of members, viz., Abram 
Trostle, Priscilla Trostle, Lewis Mickey, Elizabeth Souder, Mary 
Heckendorn, John Foulk and Mary Foulk. On the 8th of Oc- 
tober, 1843, Joseph Heckendorn and Mary Swarner were received 
as members by application. 

Rev. Kempfer resigned some time in tbe fall of '43, and near 
the close of '43 or the beginning of '44, the 

Rev. Levi T. Williams 

took charge of the congregation and served it in connection with 
Petersburg, where he resided. The first communion he held here 
was on the 26th of May, 1844, when the following, persons were 
confirmed : 

William Heckendorn, Sarah Earhart, Susan Earhart. 

On the 22d of December, 1844, having been carefully in- 
structed, the following persons were confirmed : 

Hamilton Mahaffey, Martha Mahaifey, 

Joseph Jones, Mary Rice, 

and the names of George Shearer and Hetta Shearer appear now 
for the first time in the list of members. 

During the early part of '45, a class of catechumens were in- 
structed by the pastor in the doctrines of our holy religion, and 
on the 17th of May, 1845, tbe following were confirmed : 

Philip Cornman, Susan Adams, 

Jacob Shatto, Mary A. McCord, 

Mary Shatto, Martha J. McClintock, 

Catharine Adams, Mary A. Heckendorn. 

Having served the congregation nearly two years as pastor. 



CHAPTER IV. 253 

Kev. Williams resigned in September, 1845, and was succeeded, 
on the 1st of October following, by the 

Rev. Lloyd Knight, 

who served the congregation in connection with New Bloorafield 
where he resided. At the first communion he held here, in the 
fall of '45, Kev. Knight found the congregation to consist of 55 
communicants. 

In March, 1857, it pleased the Lord to visit this congregation 
in an unusual effusion of the Holy Spirit. Of this revival we 
have the following account from the pen of liev. Knight in the 
Lutheran Observer of April 30, 1857 : 

" A protracted meeting was held the first week in March last, 
in one of our churches, built on Mount Pisgah, in Perry County, 
about twelve miles from Carlisle. And the Lord be praised, there 
was more than one Moses, who took a view of Canaan from that 
consecrated Mount. There was something peculiar about this 
work of grace. It is sometimes said by the enemies of vital 
religion, that young persons and women are easily frightened by 
the presentation of the terrors of the law, and may be brought 
into any measures ; but it was not so at this place. True, there 
were some young females and one young man, who professed to have 
experienced a change of heart; but it was among the aged that 
the Holy Spirit seemed especially to be at work. Almost every 
aged person in that vicinity now believes and feels himself to be 
a child of Grod. You may now see some eight or ten persons 
assembled with others, for singing and prayer, whose united ages 
would amount to more than six hundred years, who never before 
called on the name of the Lord with those views and feelings that 
are peculiar to the Christian. Is not the very thought as well as 
the sight of such converts a great source of joy to the angels in 
heaven, and delightful and encouraging to all good men on earth! 
There are some things connected with this meeting that will 
never be erased from my mind. Whilst preaching on Thursday 
from the words, ' Quench not the Spirit,' a respectable aged 
gentleman arose about the middle of the church and came forward 
22 



254 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

to the front pew without the least solicitation, literally bathed in 
tears. This, together with the many other indications of God's 
awful presence, almost disqualified us for the agency which we 
bore. We had no disorder, confusion, or shouting. The meet- 
ing was characterized with deep feeling and great solemnity. We 
do not confine ourselves to one way of working, but make use of 
any loay, by which more good than evil will be accomplished. 
As one result of this meeting, twelve persons were added to our 
congregation ; another is, that there is now a better state of things 
in the church — there is more interest taken in preaching, prayer- 
meetings, &c. But the final result will be known only in eternity. 
For this let us all prepare. And in view of what the Lord has 
done for us all, may we i^ay, 'Not unto us, but unto thy name, 
Lord, be all the praise forever.' " 

After the subjects of this revival had received instruction for 
some time, on the 11th of April, 1847, John A. Heekendorn and 
Charity Richter were received as members by application, and the 
following were confinued and baptized : 

William Stambaugh, ^ Mary Coniman, 

Christian Docterman, Elizabeth Jacob.s, 

Martha J. Adams, Elizabeth J. Cornraan (baptized), 

Agnes Cornman, Mary Wolf (baptized). 

Eve Cornman, 

Having preached for the congregation three years and a half, 
Rev. Knight resigned in June, 1849, and was succeeded on the 
1st of July, the same year, by the 

Rev. Jacob Martin, 

who served the congregation in connection with New Bloomfield, 
the place of his residence. When the Petersburg charge was 
regularly constituted in February, 1850, this congregation became 
an integral part of that charge. See pp. 52-54. Rev. Martin 
continued however to preach here to the end of the pastoral year, 
which was on the 1st of July, 1850, when he resigned. We 
cannot find that any were added to this congregation during the 



CHAPTER IV. 255 

year Rev. Martin was pastor of it. The Petersburg charge, as 
now constituted, was then vacant about four months. In Novem- 
ber, 1850, it was supplied by the 

Rev. John P. liiester, 

who resided at Petersburg, and preached at Mount Pisgah once 
every three weeks. Some time after he had commenced preaching 
here, he met and instructed a class of catechumens, and on the 
23d of May, 1852, the following were confirmed : 

Alexander Murphy, Susan Mickey, 

Mary Adams, Elizabeth Lenhart. 

Nancy Mickey, 

Rev. Hiester served the congregation as pastor about three 
years, and resigned in November, 1853. The charge was then 
vacant about six months. A call was then extended to the 

Rev. George A. Nixdorff, 

who commenced his pastoral labors here in June, 1854. On the 
23d of May, 1857, the following were confirmed : 

Daniel Jacobs, Julia Wolf, 

Elizabeth Jacobs, • Margaret Adams, 

Susan Wolf, Catharine Losh. 

Rev. Nixdorflf served the charge about four years, and resigned 
it in May, 1858. On the 22d of August, the same year, the pre- 
sent pastor, the 

Rev. William H. Diven, 

entered on his labors as pastor of the charge. On the 30th of Oc- 
tober, 1859, John A. Adams was confirmed, and on the 11th of 
November, 1860, James McCord and Sarah McCord were received 
by application, and Susan A. Bender was confirmed. 

On the 17th of March, 1861, after having received instruction 
for some time, the following were confirmed : 

David Sweger, Mary Hartman, 



256 



CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 



William Souder, 
Henry Souder, Jr., 
Frances McCord, 



Sarah A. Adams, 
Eleanor Adams (baptized). 



On the 13th of October, 1861, Miss Nancy Yoh was admitted 
to membership by the rite of confirmation. 

May the Lord revive this congregation ! The following is a 
list of the membership of the congregation at this time (June 1st, 
1862). 



Abram Jacobs, 
Catharine Jacobs, 
Elizabeth Jacobs, 
Joseph Heckendorn, 
Adam Heckendorn, 
Anna M. Heckendorn, 
Susan Heckendorn, 
Henry Souder, 
John Souder, 
Regina Souder, 
Elizabeth Souder, 
John Finicle, 
Susan Finicle, 
George Smeigh, 
Catharine Smeigh, 
William Souder, 
Henry Souder, 
James McCord, 
Sarah McCord, 
Frances McCord, 
Joseph Bender, 
Elizabeth Bender, 



Susan A. Bender, 
Jacob Shatto, 
John A. Adams, 
Jane Adams, 
Mary Adams, 
Sarah A. Adams, 
Eleanor Adams, 
Mary Foulk, 
David Fair, 
Frances Fair, 
David Sweger, 
Margai'et Sweger, 
Jacob Ensminger, 
Susan Ensminger, 
Susan Wolf, 
Julian A. Wolf, 
Susan Wolf, 
Sarah Sluthower, 
Elizabeth Shearer, 
Mary Hartman, 
Eebecca Lenhart, 
Nancy Yoh. 



' Revive, God, desponding saints, 
Who languisli, droop, and sigh ; 

Eefresh the soul that tires and faints 
Till mourning hearts with joy. 



CHAPTER IV. 257 

' Make known thy power, victorious King, 

Subdue each stubborn will ; 
Then sov'reign grace we'll join to sing 
On Zion's sacred hill." 



SECTION IV. 

ST. David's (billow's) church in wheatfield township. 

This church is located in "Wheatfield Township, about five miles 
southwest of Petersburg, and near the site of the old Fio Forge. 
Some of the members of this congregation had belonged to Mount 
Zion in Fishing Creek Valley, some to Mount Pisgah, a few to 
Petersburg, and a number seldom attended preaching anywhere. 
To all the places named, the members here had a considerable 
distance to go. During the summer of 1845, Rev. L. T. Wil- 
liams preached occasionally at Fio Forge school-house. The mem- 
bers, in union with another denomination, felt encouraged and 
^ able to build a church in their midst. We are informed that no 
corner-stone was laid. The edifice was erected in the summer of 
1845, and was consecrated to the service of God in November, 
1845, by the name of St. David's Church. Rev. Messrs. John 
W. Heim, Jacob Shull and Lloyd Knight, were present and con- 
ducted the various religious exercises on this solemn occasion. 
The church-edifice is a frame, about thirty feet by forty in size, 
is weather-boarded and painted white, is entered by two front 
doors, and has inside two aisles, a low pulpit, and no galleries. It 
is well located, presents a pleasing external appearance, and the 
internal arrangement is judicious. 

Rev. Lloyd Knight 

of Bloomfield commenced to preach here regularly once every four 
weeks after the church was consecrated. He was the first pastor 
of the congregation, which was regularly organized on the 20th 
of June, 1846, with twenty-seven comuaunicant members. The 
22* 



258 



CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 



names of the first officers we have not been able to learn. No en- 
tries were made in the church-book at first, and very imperfectly 
and irregularly afterwards. 

On the 14th of November, 1847, after having been instructed 
in the Catechism, the following were confirmed : 



Kachel Billow, 
Rebecca Findley, 



Mary A. Findley, 
Priscilla White. 



During the summer of 1848, another class of catechumens was 
instructed by the pastor, and on the 4th of November, 1848, the 
following twelve persons were confirmed : 



Henry Souder, 
George Wetsel, 
Joseph Leppert, 
Joseph Matlock, 
Samuel Matlock, 
Mrs. Catharine Leppert, 



Mrs. Rebecca Strough, 
Miss Louisa Matlock, 
*' Hannah Billow, 
" Caroline Mickey, 
" Alesonna Wetsel, 
" Mary A. Frey. 



As this is the first time the names of cominunicants were re- 
corded, we will give the names of the members who communed- 
with the above twelve persons on Sunday, the 5th, viz. : 



George Billow, 
Susan Billow, 
David Billow, 
Daniel Frey, 
Anna Frey, 

David Ensminger, Sen. 
Barbara Ensminger, 
David Ensminger, Jr., 
Sarah Ensminger, 
Jacob Ensminger, 
Regina Ensminger, 
Solomon Ensminger, 
Susan Ensminger, 
Henry Ensminger, 



John Leppert, 
Henry Leppert, Sen., 
Henry Leppert, Jr., 
John Souder, 
Rachel Souder, 
Sarah Souder, 
Abram Mickey, 
Mary jNIickey, 
Aaron Keim, 
Mary Keim, 
Eve Cornman, 
Mary Cornman, 
Mary Findley, 
Rebecca Findley. 



CHAPTER IV. 259 

At this time (1848) the congregation numbered about forty 
members. Having preached here three years and a half, Kev. 
Knight resigned in June, 1849, and was succeeded, on the Isfc of 
July of the same year, by 

Rev. Jacob Martin, 

who preached here once every three weeks. In February, 1850, 
this congregation was united with others to form the Petersburg 
charge, (See pp. 52-54.) Rev. Martin preached here only one 
year, resigning on the 1st of July, 1850. If any persons were 
confirmed by him here, their names were not recorded, and can 
therefore not be given by us. For about four months the Peters- 
burg charge, as now formed, was vacant. 

Rev. John P. Hiester, 

having accepted a call, commenced his labors as pastor of the 
charge in November, 1850. Whilst he was pastor a number of 
persons were confirmed here ; but for want of a record we are un- 
able to give their names. Having served the congregation about 
three years, he resigned in November, 1853. The charge was 
then vacant about six months. Having received and accepted a 
call, the 

Rev. George A. Nixclorff 

entered on the discharge of his pastoral duties in the charge in 
June, 1854. We can find no record of admissions to membership 
whilst he was pastor of this congregation, though there were some 
accessions. After he had served the congregation in the Gospel 
about four years, he resigned in May, 1858. 

It is to be greatly regretted, that whilst Rev. Messrs. Martin, 
Hiester and Nixdorff were pastors of this congregation, no record 
was kept of their official ministerial acts. It is to be hoped that 
a matter of such vital importance will not be neglected hereafter 
by this or any other Lutheran congregation in Perry County. A 
word to the wise will suffice. After a vacancy of a few months, 
the 

Rev. William H. Diven 



260 



CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 



accepted a call, and commenced liis labors as pastor on the 22d of 
August, 1858. After having been instructed for some time in 
the doctrines of the Christian religion, on the 18th of December, 
1859, the following eight persons were confirmed : 



Joseph H. Marshall, 
Martha J. Billow, 
Kuth Ann Fisher, 
Matilda Cooper, 



Sarah Cooper, 
Susan Heiner, 
Mary A. Green, 
Eliza S. McConnal, 



On the 7th of October, 1860, Eli Young by baptism and John 
Ziegler by confirmation were admitted as members of this congre- 
gation. 

We regret that for want of church-records and other authentic 
documents our historical sketch of this congregation could not be 
made fuller. We availed ourselves of every source of information, 
and herewith submit the result of our investigation. In compli- 
ance with the wish of many, we will yet add a list of all the mem- 
bers of this congregation at the present time, June, 1862. 



David Ensminger, 
Wm. Henry Ensminger, 
Barbara Ensminger, 
Rebecca Ensming^, 
Susan Ensminger, 
Benjamin Jones, 
Elizabeth Jones, 
Ruth A. Fisher, 
William Smeigh, 
Susan Smeigh, 
Susan Heiner, 
Augustus McKenzie, 
Catharine McKenzie, 
Samuel McKenzie, 
R. K. Adams, 
Susan Adams, 
Ludwig Cornman, 



Mary Cornman, 
Anna Frey, 
Eli Young, 
Mary Young, 
Mercy A. Green, 
John Ziegler, 
Susan Ziegler, 
Margaret Ziegler, 
Samuel Weaver, 
Leah Weaver, 
Henry Leppert, Sen., 
Henry Leppert, Jr., 
Hannah Leppert, 
Aaron Keim, 
Mary Keim, 
Mrs. Spiece. 



, CHAPTER IV. 261' 



' Jesus shall reign -where'er the sun, 
Does his successive journeys run ; 
His kingdom stretch from shore to shore 
Till moons shall wax and wane no more. 

People and realms of ev'ry tongue 
Dwell on his love with grateful song ; 
And with united hearts proclaim 
That grace and truth by Jesus came." 



SECTION V. 



CHURCH NEAR NEW BUFFALO ON THE SUSQUEHANNA IN WATTS 
TOWNSHIP. 

The history of this church is involved in considerable obscurity, 
as we have no data to guide us with certainty. It is located in 
Watts Township, about one mile west of the borough of New 
Buffalo on the west bank of the Susquehanna. The town of New 
Buffalo was laid out in 1800 by Jacob Baughman. In a survey 
of land, adjoining the church-land, made May 29th, 1800, it is 
said, " Vacant land for church and school purposes." As here 
stated, about three acres of land lay vacant for the purposes spe- 
cified, though it would seem no church was as yet built on it. 
No legal right was secured for this land till 1840, when we find 
the following : '' Warrant to Samuel Albright in trust for the 
Presbyterian and Lutheran congregations, dated September 28th, 
1840." On the basis of this warrant, some years ago, Mr. Al- 
bright made a deed to the congregations therein named. 

Tradition says that in the Half-Falls Mountain Gap a small 
church was ei'ected by the early settlers some eighty years ago, 
near a beautiful spring, on land vacant only a few years ago. 
This church, in the heart of Half-Falls Mountain, was burnt 
down about the beginning of the present century. The stones 
which served as the foundation of the building may still be seen 
lying in the order they were placed by the builders. There is no 



262 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

graveyard here. It is supposed this church was located here in 
order that the settlers on both sides of the mountain might enjoy 
the advantages of divine worship. Where the present church is 
located, in the valley on the southeast of Half-Falls Mountain, 
there is an old and very large graveyard, and here the early settlers 
buried their dead. When, therefore, the old church in the Gap 
of the Mountain had been burnt, another church was erected, at 
the beginning of the present century, on the three acres of land, 
which contained the graveyard and was reserved " for church and 
school purposes," about one mile west of New Buffalo on the 
west bank of the Susquehanna River. This was about the origin 
of this church. 

Among the earliest settlers of this region on the west of the 
Susquehanna were Germans, belonging to the Lutheran Church. 
In 1767, Christopher Mann located the land on which New Buf- 
falo was afterwards laid out. In 1772, George Albright (German, 
Albrecht) settled on the " south side of Buffalo Mountain," and 
Jacob Buck (German, Bock), on land called " Buck's Field," now 
the east end of Buck's Valley on the Susquehanna. In 1773, 
Christopher Heyne, Jacob Luckenbeel, Augustus Millichsack, 
and, in 1774, Frederick Hummel and Nicholas Littich settled in 
this section of countrj^ These pioneer settlers were from time to 
time joined by others from the east of the river, so that before 
the close of last century their number was considerable. It is not 
known who preached first for them. The first minister whose 
name is remembered was 

Rev. Mathias Giinfzel, 

who preached also for the early Lutheran settlers in Foutz's Val- 
ley. The length of time he preached here is not known for cer- 
tain ; it must have been, however, from about 1789 to 1796. 
He preached in the old log church on Half-Falls Mountain. He 
was succeeded, in 1796, by the 

Eev. JoJui Herhst 
of Carlisle, who no doubt preached also in the old church in 



CHAPTER IV. 263 

Half-Falls Mountain Gap. We suppose the members had at this 
time only occasional visits by the minister, who performed home 
missionary labor in a new and sparsely settled district of country. 
Rev. Herbst resigned at Carlisle in 1801, and, in 1804, he was 
succeeded in Foutz's Valley by the 

Rev. Conrad Walter* 

then residing at Middleburg, Snyder County, Pa., who, we are 
told by aged persons, preached also here. He preached in Foutz's 
Valley from 1804 to 1809, and about the same time at this place. 
So far as we can learn, it was during this time that the church 
was built on the three acres of vacant land near New Buffalo. It 
was a log structure without galleries, about thirty-six by forty feet 
in size. If the church had a distinctive name, we have never 
heard it. It is probable that, during winter, school was also kept 
here for some time. This old church was removed in the fall of 
1860, and a new one, just completed, has been erected on the 
same site by the Lutherans and Presbyterians. An unusually 
large, and, to all appearance, old graveyard is attached to the 
property. For more than a century the dead of this vicinity have 
been buried here. The pioneer settlers of this region repose here, 
and from year to year has the ground been broken to receive the 
remains of three generations. What a heaving of earth will 
there be here on the resurrection day ! 

In 1809, Rev. Walter ceased to preach in the territory now 
embraced in Perry County. Rev. J. George Heim succeeded 
him that year in Foutz's Valley and at Liverpool ; but as Mr. 
Heim has himself told us, he did not preach at the New Buffalo 
Church. Hence, we suppose Rev. Osterloh preached occasionally 
for this congregation from 1809 to 1814, or perhaps they were 

* Rev. Conrad Walter died at Middleburg on the 11th of August, 1819, 
in his 44th year. At the time of his death he served eight congregations, of 
■which he had been pastor for fifteen years. It is supposed that not less than 
fifteen hundred persons attended his funeral. He was a good man and highly 
esteemed by his people, and did much towards the establishment of congre- 
gations over a large territory of country. 



264 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

visited at times by some minister from the east of the Susque- 
hanna, or there was perhaps no preaching here during that time. 
There is not a document or man to be found that can give us the 
desired information. 

Rev. John William Eeim, 

at the request and under the care of Rev. Walter, first visited 
the congregation in April, 1814. He received license to preach 
in June, 1814, and then commenced to preach here regularly 
once every four weeks. In his pastoral journal he says : " On 
the 18th of June, 1814, I preached the third time at Buck's 
from Luke 13 : 18. Hymn : Ich loill von meiner missethnt, &c. 
At Liverpool I preached from John 3 : 16. Hymn : Aho hat 
Gott die loelt geliebet, &c. Baptized nine infants." Some fa- 
milies by the name of Buck (German, Bock) resided then in the 
vicinity of the church, and hence Bev. Heim called it Buck's 
Church or School-house. We have no means of knowing the nu- 
merical strength of the congregation, or who the members were 
at the time Bev. Heim commenced to preach here. 

During the summer of 1816, Rev. Heim instructed at this 
place a class of catechumens, and as he says in his journal : " On 
the 30th of November, 1816, I preached the preparatory sermon 
at Buck's from Gal. 6 : 4, 5. Hymn : Ich will von meiner mis- 
sethat, &c. Baptized three of n}y catechumens. December 1st, 
1816, I preached the communion sermon from John 7 : 37. 
Hymn : Der yn<iden-hrunn, &c. At Liverpool I preached from 
Rom. 13 : 11-14. Hymn : Such wer da will, &c. Baptized 
one infant." This was the first time Rev. Heim held communion 
here. Who and how many were confirmed, or what the number 
of members was at this time, we have no means of knowing. 

Rev. Heim preached here till about 1830. As his charge was 
so very large, and, as we think, this congregation was not large, 
he did not preach regularly here, and only visited it at long inter- 
vals during the last four or five years he was pastor of it. Then 
for about three years the congregation had no preaching at all. 



CHAPTER IV. 265 

In 1833, the Liverpool pastorate was formed, of which, in the 
same year, the 

Rev. C. G. Erlenmeyer 

took charge. For a time Rev. Erlenmeyer preached here regu- 
larly, then only occasionally, and in 1836 or 1837 ceased alto- 
gether. After this, we are told, Father Heim again visited and 
preached for the congregation on week-days. Kev. Erlenmeyer 
resigned the Liverpool pastorate in the spring of 1842. In No- 
vember of the same year, the 

Rev. Andrew Berg, 

partly in the capacity of a home missionary, took charge of Liver- 
pool and the congregations and preaching places connected with 
it. He preached also occasionally at New Buffalo for about six 
months. But to the regret of these weak and struggling con- 
gregations. Rev. Berg resigned in June, 1843. In the fall of 
1843, 

Rev. Levi T. Williams 

took charge of the congregation at Petersburg, and also preached 
sometimes at New Buffalo. We are unable to say whether he 
confirmed any here or not, ^r what the condition of the congre- 
gation was at this time. Neglected and only partially supplied 
with preaching, it could not but dwindle down to a mere frag- 
ment of what it once was. In September, 1845, Rev. Williams 
resigned, and on the 1st of October following, the 

Rev. Lloyd Kniyht 

took charge of the congregation and served it in connection with 
Bloomfield. At the first communion he held here, in the fall of 
1845, he found keven/een communicant members. During the 
early part of 1848, he instructed some persons in the Catechism, 
and on the 28th of May, 1848, the following were confirmed : 

William Finicle, Louisa Finicle, 

Samuel Littig, Sarah Littig. 

2H 



266 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

Again, on the 20th of August, the same year, the following 
persons were confirnied, viz., Levi Siders and Catharine Siders. 

Having preached here about three years and a half, Kev. Knight 
resigned in June, 1849, and in July following, the 

Rev. Jacob Martin 

took charge of the congregation and served it about one year in 
connection with Bloonifield. In February, 1860, when the 
Petersburg charge was formed (see pp. 52-54), this congregation 
was attached to that charge. 

Rev. John P. Hiester 

took charge of the Petersburg pastorate in November, 1850. He 
preached for the congregation, though not regularly, and he met 
with no success. For reasons we have not been able to learn, the 
congregation was opposed to being attached to the Petersburg 
charge. Hence Synod, in September, 1852, "appointed a com- 
mittee, consisting of Ilevs. Gerhardt, Erlenmeyer, and Williams, 
to go to Buflalo, to preach for the Lutheran congregation of the 
place, and endeavor to bring them into connection with the Pe- 
tersburg charge." The congregation afterwards united with said 
charge. In November, 1853, Rev. Hiester resigned, and in June, 
1854, the 

Rev. Georye A. Nixdorff 

took charge of the pastorate. He preached occasionally at New 
Buffalo. It was counted only as a preaching-place. It seems 
various diflSculties were in the way of success whilst he was pas- 
tor of the congregation. In May, 1858, Rev. Nixdorif resigned, 
and in August of the same year, he was succeeded by the pre- 
sent pastor, 

Rev. William H. Diven, 

who has since been preaching regularly here. Hitherto the want 
of a more suitable house of worship had been a great hindrance 
to the growth of the congregation. The old church had become 
dilapidated, was inconvenient and in every respect unsuitable. 



CHAPTER IV. 267 

Hence, in the fall of 1860, the old building was removed, and 
on the site of it a new church was erected, of frame, and thirty 
by thirty-five feet in size. This new church was dedicated on the 
2d of June, 1861, when the Rev. Diven preached a suitable dis- 
course. The church and land connected with it belong to the 
Lutherans and Presbyterians. 

This congregation has in a measure been neglected for a long 
time, and as a consequence the members were gradually scattered 
and their number was greatly reduced. Difficulties, also, of va- 
rious kinds seemed constantly to be in the way of its progress. 
The want of a suitable house, the transition from the German to 
the English language, the want of regular preaching, and the fluc- 
tuating nature of the population along the river, as well as abound- 
ing wickedness, tended all to retard and bear down the rise and 
progress of the congregation. The few members still left are a 
noble band ; and now that they have a new church and regular 
preaching, it is to be hoped that a brighter day will dawn upon 
them, and this congregation will ere long attain its pristine strength 
and glory. May the Lord revive his work among this people, and 
glorify his name in their godly lives and final salvation ! 

On the 1st of June, 1861, the following were admitted to 
membership by certificate : 

Mary Gray, Lydia Hemperly, Mary A. Shatto. 

On the 9th of February, 1862, the following persons were ad- 
mitted by certificate and confirmation : 

John Garman, Esq., Sarah Liddig, 

Frederick Liddig, Benjamin Livingston, 

Elizabeth Liddig, Esther Livingston. 
Samuel Liddig, 

At this time (June, 1862), the congregation consists of the 
following members, viz. : 

George Swartz, Christiana Siders, 

Elizabeth Swartz, Sarah Hammaker, 



268 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

Daniel Livingston, George Arnold, 

Christian Livingston, John Garman, Esq., 

Benjamin Livingston, Barbara Arnold, 

Margaret Livingston, Margaret Shatto, 

Esther Livingston, Frederick Liddig, 

Catharine Livingston, Mary Gray, 

J. Liddig ( (?erma?i, Littick), Lydia Heniperly, 
Catharine Liddig, . Elizabeth Liddig, 

Samuel Liddig, Mary A. Shatto. 
Sarah Liddig, 

" Yes ! we trust the day is breaking ; 
Joyful times are near at hand : 
God, the mighty God, is speaking 
By his word in ev'ry land : 

When he chooses, 
Darkness flies at his command. 

" Let us hail the joyful season ; 
Let us hail the dawning ray : 
When the Lord appears, there's reason 
To expect a glorious day : 

At his presence, 
Gloom and darkness flee away." 



SECTION VI. 

PREACHING STATION IN CONNECTION WITH PETERSBURG CHARGE. 

In Carroll Township, about five miles southeast of Bloomfield, 
at Green Bank or Lackey's School-house, Rev. W. H. Diven has 
been preaching occasionally, in the evening, since 1860. The 
members here belonged, some to Bloomfield, some to Mount 
Pisgah, and a few to Mount Zion in Fishing Creek Valley. 
About thirty members of the Lutheran Church attend preaching 
at Green Bank School-house. On the 22d of June, 1862, the 



CHAPTER IV. 



following brethren were elected and installed as the first officers 
of the cono-reoation : 



John Sweger, ) Joseph Bender, , 

James McCord, ^^'^''''- Christian Fenicle, ^ ^^«^«"«- 



.} 



A church-edifice is now much needed here. The prospects for 
gathering a good congregation are encouraging. It is proposed 
to unite this station with the Bloomfield charge after the 1st of 
September, '62, and arrangements to that effect have been made. 
This will give the members day-preaching once every three weeks. 
May the good cause prosper and the Lord be glorified ! 

" From all who dwell below the skies 
Let the Creator's praise arise ; 
Let the Redeemer's name be sung, 
Through ev'ry land, by ev'ry tongue." 



23* 



270 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 



CHAPTER V. 

LIVERPOOL CHARGE. 

Though some of the congregations composing this charge are 
among the oldest in Perry County, for want of church-records we 
can say least concerning them. It is a matter of great regret, 
that there was such utter neglect on the part of the early minis- 
ters and church-councils in not putting on record the various and 
more important items of information with regard to the churches 
— information so interesting to us now, but to us wholly and 
forever lost. In our sketches of the history of the churches of 
this charge, we must rely chiefly on the frail memories of the 
aged, and, in connection with such facts as we know for certain, 
will endeavor to give an approximately correct history of each 
congregation. The charge, it may be said, was formed in 1830, 
when Rev. Heim consented to yield the congregations to another 
pastor as soon as they should call one. 



SECTION I. 



THE CONGREGATION AT LIVERPOOL. 

At the close of the last century and the beginning of the 
present, a number of families, belonging to the Lutheran Church, 
settled on the west bank of the Susquehanna in the vicinity where 
the town of Liverpool was afterwards located. We cannot say 
when and by whom they had preaching first. So far as we can 
learn, they had occasional preaching, by diflFerent ministers, until 
the 

Rev. Conrad Walter, 



CHAPTER V. 271 

of Middleburg, Snyder County, from 1804 to 1809, preached 
frequently, and perhaps regularly, for them on his way to and 
from Foutz's Valley. He preached in a school-house, standing 
on a lot of ground, which John Huggins reserved for church and 
school purposes at the time the town of Liverpool was laid out. 
On this lot and the very site of the old school -house the church 
was afterwards built. In 1809, the 

Rev. George Helm 

of near Lewisburg, Union County, commenced to preach here, in 
Foutz's Valley, in Tuscarora Valley near Perry ville, at Mifflintown, 
Lewistown, in Decatur Township east of Lewistown, and a number 
of other places, to Lewisburg on the Susquehanna. This state- 
ment we have from his own lips, and the preaching-places are 
named in his license. How it was possible for a man to do justice 
to such a charge, we are at a loss to know, or why Synod should 
assign to a licentiate such an extended field of labor is a mystery 
to us. We examined his certificate of licensure with care ; it is 
a curious document of the olden times ; there are given the names 
of the congregations he must serve, and he is not to neglect one 
of the ten or twelve named, although some were forty or fifty 
miles apart the one from the other. Mr. Heim informed us, 
also, that in 1810 he organized the congregation at Liverpool in 
the old school-house, and the one at Nieman's, now St. John's. 
He served these congregations till 1814, when his brother, the 

Rev. John William Heim, 

succeeded him. On the 8th of June, 1814, Synod licensed him 
to preach, and in his Journal he says: ''On the 18th of June, 
1814, I preached at Liverpool in the afternoon from John 3 : 16, 
and baptized an infant." At a later date, he says : " On the 17th 
of December, 1814, in the evening, I preached at Stollenberger's 
School-house from Eph. 5 : 14." Stollenberger's must have been 
in the neighborhood of Liverpool, as Rev. Heim preached alter- 
nately at these places on the same Sunday he preached at New 
Buffalo. The first year he was pastor he preached at Liverpool 



272 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

only five times. We suppose tbe congregation was small and 
scattered at this time. During the second year he also preached 
here only five times. He says : " On the 24th of December, 
1815, I preached in the school-house at Liverpool from Exod. 
20 : 24, and baptized three infants." And again, he says : "In 
the afternoon of the 7th of July, 1816, I preached in the school- 
house at Liverpool from Luke 6 : 36-42, and baptized eight in- 
fants and two women." During the third year, closing in June, 
1817, he preached twelve times at Liverpool, that is, he now 
preached here about once every four weeks. His Journal closes 
in June, 1817, and we can therefore not follow him in his later 
labors here. To this time he had not yet administered the Lord's 
Supper at Liverpool. We know little of Rev. Heim's success at 
this place, and cannot say who, and how many were confirmed by 
him from time to time, or how strong the congregation was. No 
church-record was kept, and there are no aged members here to 
give us the desired information. Rev. Heim preached in the 
school-house till the church was completed. 

In the spring of 1828, the corner-stone of the church was laid 
on the site where the old school-house had stood. Besides Rev. 
Heim, we cannot learn that other ministers participated in the 
religious exercises of this occasion. The wall of the edifice, a log- 
frame, was put up in the summer of 1828. This naked wall stood 
then without roof till 1831, when it received a roof, was weather- 
boarded outside, and finished inside. It had three high galleries 
and a high bell-shaped pulpit, mounted on a post. Outside the 
church was painted white, and a steeple and bell surmounted 
it. It is about thirty-five feet by forty in size, will seat from three 
to four hundred persons, and occupies a commanding position on 
an elevated spot of ground on the edge of Liverpool borough. 
The church was consecrated in the fall of 1831, when Rev. Heim 
and, perhaps, some other ministers oflSciated. In the erection 
and completion of the church, George Lutz, George Earner, 
George Tharp, David Stewart, Christian Weirich, John Roush, 
and a few others, took the most active and prominent part. We 



CHAPTER V. 273 

have no means of knowing what the numerical strength of the 
congregation was at this time, though it could not have been great. 
At the convention of Synod in October, 1829, " Kev. Heim 
promised to resign St. John's, St. Michael's in Foutz's Valley, 
the Liverpool and New Buffalo congregations, as soon as a pastor 
should be secured to supply them. In the mean time. Synod de- 
sired that the neighboring ministers would visit this district." 
Thus, the Liverpool charge was first formed, though it has since 
passed through various changes. As these congregations were 
not soon supplied by a pastor, Kev. Heim still continued to preach 
for them occasionally for some years. In the summer of 1833, as 
a candidate for the ministry, the 

Rev. Charles Gusiavus Erlenmeyer 

visited the charge and preached to the congregations. His 
preaching and labors were highly acceptable to the members, 
and they requested the West Pennsylvania Synod, at its conven- 
tion in October, 1833, to license him as their pastor. The 
minutes of that convention of Synod contain the following action : 
"No. 2. Consists of six different documents, which contain 
recommendations of Mr. Erlenmeyer, and testify to his irreproach- 
able walk, and a desire is expressed that he might be received as 
a member of this Synod. These documents are (a) of St. John's 
Church in Perry Township, Union (now Snyder) County, (b) of 
Liverpool in Perry County, (c) Millersburg in Dauphin County, 
((/) McCallisterstown in Juniata County, (e) of St. Michael's 
Church in Foutz's Valley and New BufEiilo in Perry County." 
As Mr. Erlenmeyer's examination was entirely satisfactory, he 
received a candidate's license. Thus, in October, 1833, Rev. 
Erlenmeyer became the regular pastor of the Liverpool charge. 
He served the congregation at Liverpool, where he resided, about 
eight years and a half, and resigned it in the spring of 1842. 
For want of documents we cannot say what success attended his 
labors here, or who and how many were confirmed by him. We 
are inclined to the opinion that the congregation was small and 
in a languishing condition. 



274 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 



Rev. Andrew Berij 

took charge of the Liverpool pastorate in November, 184lJ. lie 
resided at Liverpool, and preached here, at Petersburg, at Buck's 
School-house near the Susquehanna, at St. Michael's in Foutz's 
Valley, and perhaps at a number of other places. He received 
some aid from the Home Missionary Society of the Synod. 
Having preached in the charge only about six months, he resigned 
in June, 1843. If any persons were confirmed by him at Liver- 
pool, we have been unable to learn the fact. The congregation 
does not seem to have made much progress at this time ; nay, we 
think it was on the decline, owing to the want of regular preach- 
ing as well as piety and united efforts on the part of the members. 

After Rev. Berg had resigned, the charge was without preach- 
ing till 1847. In the mean time. Synod put forth repeated efforts 
to have it supplied. Thus, in the minutes of Synod, September, 
1845, it is said, that " with respect to the condition of our mem- 
bers ... at Liverpool, &c., . . . some interesting statements were 
made by Rev. Messrs. Eggers, Anspach, and Rosenberg." 
Though the destitute condition of the congregations of the Liver- 
pool charge was distinctly presented to the consideration of Synod, 
still no supply was secured. Again, in the minutes of Septem- 
ber, 1846, it is stated that ''the brethren Knight, Heim, Hickok, 
Boyer, and Berg, made some interesting remarks on the condition 
of our vacant congregations in Perry County ; — Whereupon it was 

" Resolved, That we especially direct the attention of our licen- 
tiates to the vacant congregations in question. 

" Resolved, That Brother Ehrenfeld be earnestly requested to 
take into consideration the condition of these congregations, in 
case he receive license. 

" Resolved, That in case Brother Ehrenfeld does not accept a 
call from these congregations, that then Rev. Messrs. Heim, 
Flint, Anspach, Hoffman, Thorn, Babb and Knight be required 
to visit them at least twice during the year." 

Rev. Ehrenfeld received license, but did not accept a call from 
the Liverpool charge. Hence, in accordance with the last of the 



CHAPTER V. 275 

above resolutions, Rev. Heim, and perhaps also some of the other 
nnnisters named, visited and preached several times for some of 
the congregations. Early in the beginning of 1847, the charge 
was supplied by the 

Rev. William Weaver, 

who preached at seven different places, viz., at Liverpool, at 
Christ's Church in Wild Cat A^alley, at Millerstown, at St. Mi- 
chael's Church in Foutz's Valley, at St. James's Church in Turkey 
Valley, at Richfield, and at St. John's (Nieman's) Church. In 
September, 1848, as delegate of the charge, Mr. George Kepner 
attended Synod. Having served these congregations for four 
years with more or less success. Rev. Weaver resigned in the be- 
ginning of 1851, when the Church-Councils of the charge met 
at Millerstown and drew up the following paper : 

" We wish to inform the brethren in the ministry, that the 
Millerstown (or Liverpool) pastorate is now vacant, and that we 
are anxious to be supplied with one ' to break unto us the bread 
of life/ This charge may not be as pleasant as many others at 
present; but we hope that such arrangements will shortly be made 
with a neighboring charge as will not only render it desirable, but 
will also enable us to give a competent support. Such arrange- 
ments have been in contemplation for some time, and will no 
doubt be carried into effect. We deem it due to our much-es- 
teemed pastor, Rev. Weaver, to say that we deeply regret his de- 
parture from us. He has faithfully labored in our midst for four 
years. During this time he organized thirteen Sabbath-schools 
within the bounds of this pastorate, and established a number of 
prayer-meetings. He lectured also frequently on temperance, and 
obtained as high as fifty signers to the pledge in one evening. 
His success in this laudable enterprise procured for him the ap- 
pointment of a Perry County Temperance Lecturer. By his zeal 
and perseverance a neat and comfortable house of worship was 
erected in Foutz's Valley, where we had but three male members. 
In the month of March, 1850, he made an effort to organize a 
Lutheran congregation at Millerstown, and upwards of forti/ 



276 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

united themselves in that organization ; sixteen more were added 
on the 5th of this month (January, 1851), at which time the 
Lord's Supper was administered. A considerable number has 
been added to the Church, and much good has been done for the 
cause of God in general during his ministry among us. Like 
many other faithful ambassadors of Christ, he met also with some 
opposition ; but by his consistent deportment he secured the en- 
tire confidence of his people and of the community in general. 
May the Lord abundantly bless his efforts in his new field of labor! 
Should any brother feel inclined to visit this charge, or desire 
more information, he will please address, — 

"William Rice, 
" P. Laudenslager. 

" Millerstown, Perry County, Pa., 
January 24th, 1851."* 

After Rev. Weaver had resigned, the charge was vacant till 
October, 1856 ; though Synod, by passing resolutions in the 
meantime, made repeated efforts to have it supplied. 

As the territory embraced in the charge was too extensive, and 
the number of preaching-places too great, in September, 1850, 
when Rev. Weaver expressed before Synod his intention to resign 
the charge at the expiration of his pastoral year. Synod then 
changed the charge by adding some congregations to it and taking 
others from it. The following resolution was passed : 

" Resolved, That the Liverpool, Banner's, Richfield, Nieman's, 
Hunter's Valley and Leininger's congregations be advised to form 
themselves into a new pastoral charge, and that Rev. C G. Erlen- 
meyer be requested to visit these churches and inform them of 
the action of Synod, and aid them to the extent of his ability in 
securing the services of a minister." What was to become of 
Millerstown, Wild Cat Valley, Foutz's Valley and Turkey Valley, 
is not stated. Probably it was designed that they should form 
themselves into a separate pastorate. But whatever the design of 

* See Lutheran Observer, February 7th, 1851. 



CHAPXER V. . 277 

Synod may have been, it is certain that the project did not suc- 
ceed. The congregations not provided for had no preaching, and 
llev. Erlenmeyer was unsuccessful in securing a minister for the 
new pastorate. Thus this large field lay vacant, and as a conse- 
quence many of the members became discouraged or united with 
one of the many sects, then so rampant in that section of country. 
Hence, in September, 1851, Synod took the following action : 

'' Resolved, That the churches (above named) in Perry County 
and vicinity (some being also located in Juniata County), in which 
the Lutheran Church has an interest, be hereby declared vacant. 

" Resolved, That these vacant congregations be referred to the 
favorable notice of any ordained minister or licentiate, at present, 
or hereafter to be connected with this body. 

" Resolved, That they be recommended to the Executive Com- 
mittee of the Home Missionary Society for an appropriation. 

" Resolved, That the President of Synod be requested to en- 
deavor to secure for them the services of a minister as soon as 
possible." The designs of Synod were certainly good, and it 
passed good resolutions, but unfortunately they were resolutions 
only on paper. Hence, in September, 1852, the President of 
Synod reported, tliat though he was last year requested to secure 
a minister for the vacant congregations in Perry County as soon 
as possible, he "was not able to carry out the wishes of Synod." 
The Synod then, " Resolved, That the vacant churches in Perry 
County be recommended to the attention of the Domestic Mis- 
sionary Society for aid." Here the matter ended for the time 
being. In September, 1853, Synod took no notice of these desti- 
tute congregations. In September, 1854, the last time the West 
Pennsylvania Synod took action relative to this vacant field, was 
in these words : " Millerstown (or Liverpool) charge, reported va- 
cant, was referred to Juniata Conference, which was directed to 
supply it with preaching as often as possible." From what we 
know, the members of this Conference preached but seldom, if 
any, for any of the congregations composing the Liverpool charge. 
During these years of almost total destitution, it need not surprise 
us that the congregations dwindled down to the very verge of ex- 
24 



278 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

tinction. But a brighter day was soon to dawn upon this ne- 
glected part of the Lord's vineyard.. 

In February, 1855, the Lutheran St/vod of Central Pennsyl- 
vania was organized, and all Perry County was included within 
the bounds of the new Synod. Efforts were put forth as soon as 
possible to resuscitate the congregations of the Liverpool charge 
by sending them a minister of the Gospel. Hence, in May, 1856, 
the President of Synod reported, that " the congregations of the 
Liverpool charge were still vacant," and " recommended them to 
the special attention of Synod." Accordingly, a Committee on 
Home Missions was instantly appointed, to whose care and atten- 
tion all vacancies within the bounds of Synod were referred. 
This committee did its utmost to secure a missionary for the Li- 
verpool charge, and the efforts thus put forth were successful. 
For, on the 1st of October, 1856, 



Rev. Jos! ah Zi 



mmennan 



took charge of the Liverpool pastorate or mission, under trying 
and discouraging circumstances. Rev. Zimmerman resided at 
Millerstown. He gives the following account of his labors in 
this charge : 

" I took charge of the congregations, composing the Liverpool 
charge or mission, on the 1st of October, 1856, and preached my 
first sermon on the 5th of that month. Several Sabbaths after- 
wards, I preached my introductory sermon from Rom. 15 : 29, 
80. Amidst various successes and reverses, I served the congre- 
gations two years and a half, and resigned on the 1st of April, 
1859. During the first year I preached at eight different places, 
and occasionally at school-houses. My regular appointments were 
Millerstown, Wild Cat Valley, Liverpool, Richfield, Pfoutz's Val- 
ley, Wright's School-house, and for about three months at Nie- 
man's (St. John's) Church. I preached also occasionally at Watt's 
School-house, at Cagill's School-house, and in Raccoon Valley, near 
Donally's Mill. After I had explored the territory thoroughly, I 
obtained, at the end of the first year, permission from Synod's 
Committee on Home Missions, to drop some points and confine 



CHAPTER V. 279 

my labors to the following five congregations, viz., Millerstown, 
Wild Cat Valley, Liverpool, Turkey Valley, and Richfield. At 
each of these places I then preached once every two weeks until 
I resigned. Whilst laboring in this field, I received during the 
first year two hundred dollars from Synod's Home Missionary 
Society, and during the second year one hundred dollars. Dur- 
ing the next six months I received nothing from said Society ; 
but would have received fifty dollars had I remained in the charge 
to the end of the year. In regard to the success" that attended 
my labors in the charge I will say nothing. I tried to preach 
only three or four times in the German language — more was, how- 
ever, needed in the charge. Eev. Hackenberger, I understand, 
is most successful where I could do least, especially at Christ's 
Church in Wild Cat Valley, where none were confirmed whilst T 
was pastor. The only person I confirmed at Liverpool was Mr. 
George Tharp." 

When Rev. Zimmerman entered on his pastoral labors in the 
charge, he found at Liverpool no organization and but few mem- 
bers belonging to the Lutheran Church ; though there was, how- 
ever, material enough to build up a large congregation. 

In May, 1857, Mr. A. Kohler of Richfield attended Synod at 
Perryville as delegate of the charge. In IMay, 1858, as delegate, 
Mr. John Dimm attended Synod at Bloomfield, and in May, 
1859, Mr. Samuel Dimm attended Synod as commissioner of the 
charge. 

Though Rev. Zimmerman's labors were not crowned with that 
immediate success he could have desired, he nevertheless did a 
good work. He explored the field, he collected the scattered 
members and aroused them from their lethargy, he removed diffi- 
culties, organized the congregations anew, prepared the way for 
his successors, and advanced the charge so far that it could sustain 
a pastor without aid from Synod. His consistent walk as a Chris- 
tian, his humility, his mildness, his kindness, together with his 
high tone of piety and manly defence of the Gospel, made a deep 
and abiding impression for good on all ingenuous and well-dis- 
posed minds Though he left, yet the result of his labors re- 



280 CHURcnES between the mountains. 

mained and continued to bear testimony to his unwearied efforts 
for man's good, and the seed of the word he sowed with prayers 
and watered with tears bears now a glorious harvest. Thus one 
sows and another reaps. Having spent two years and a half in 
this field, and having undergone much self-denial and performed 
hard labor, Rev. Zimmerman resigned on the 1st of April, 1859. 
The charge was then vacant about four months. The officers of 
Synod were instructed to secure a pastor for the charge. In Au- 
gust of the same year, the 

Rev. Jacolt A. HucJcenherger 

commenced his pastoral labors in the charge. He resided at Li- 
verpool. The charge now sustained itself without aid from the 
Home Missionary Society. During the first year he was pastor, 
Rev. Hackenberger preached at Liverpool, at Christ's Church in 
Wild Cat Valley, at St. Michael's in Pfoutz's Valley, at St. James's 
in Turkey Valley, at Richfield, and also occasionally at Millers- 
town, in Raccoon Valley near Donally's Mill, and some other 
places. Thus his charge extended from river to river, and even 
west of the Juniata. Finding his labors too much scattered to be 
effectual, in August, 1860, he ceased to preach at Millerstown 
and all the stations bordering on i\\Q Juniata, and confined his 
labors to Liverpool and the congregations on the Susquehanna. 
This was a judicious move, as it opened the way for a division of 
this extended territory and the formation of the Millerstown Mis- 
sion or charge. With regard to the congregation at Liverpool, 
Rev. Hackenberger says : 

" The name of the church, if it ever had any, cannot be re- 
membered. I have not been able to find a constitution ; though 
I suppose the congregation had one, but it is lost. We have now 
adopted the one prepared for congregations by the Synod of Cen- 
tral Pennsylvania. We removed the old pulpit and put a new 
one in its place, and have in other respects made improvements in 
the internal arrangements of the church. I preach every Sabbath 
at Liverpool, alternately in the morning and evening, and at the 



CHAPTER V. 281 

Other places every two weeks. The congregation is now in a pro- 
mising condition, and, if it receive proper attention, may become 
a large one. Since I have been here, considerable progress has 
been made. The Sunday-school, which was in a languishing con- 
dition, is now prospering, and the attendance on the stated ser- 
vices of God's house is encouraging." 

On the 5th of December, 1S59, Peter K. Moyer and Mrs. Sa- 
rah Moyer were confirmed, and in the spring of 1860, Frederick 
Staily, Mrs. Abbie Staily, and Mrs. Elizabeth Shuman. 

In May, 1860, Mr. Jonathan Wert, as delegate of the charge, 
attended Synod at Petersburg, Perry County. 

On the 7th of October, 1860, Mrs. Sarah Lutz, Miss Sarah J. 
Kepnei", Miss Mary J. McCracken, and Miss Sarah Moyer were 
confirmed, and on the 20th of April, 1861, the following persons 
(some of them froP-i Hunter's Valley) were confirmed : 

David Wagner, Susan Hunter, 

James Coulter, Hannah Coulter, 

Mary J. Seiler, Hannah Keisinger, 

Leah J. Shusely, Elizabeth Cargill, 
Mary A. Shusely, 

and at the same time the following were received from other de- 
nominations by certificate : 

George Kepner, Mrs. Mary Hackenberger, 

Mrs. E. Kepner, Isabella Wagner, 

" Lydia Hain, Jane Wells. 

Including the preaching-station in Huntei'!s Valley, the num- 
ber of communicant members, in June, 1861, was fortij-seven at 
Liverpool. Of these, one-half were received by Rev. Hackenber- 
ger. His labors of love were successful and greatly blessed. The 
congregation prospered and promised fair. To the regret of all 
Rev. Hackenberger's health failed, and in August, 1861, he re- 
signed the charge, having served it two years. The charge was 
then vacant about seven months. On the 1st of April, 1862, the 

24- 



282 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

Rev. John H. Davidson, 

having accepted a call, entered on the discharge of his pastoral 
duties in the pastorate. The charge, as now served by him, con- 
sists of the following congregations, viz., Liverpool, Christ's Church 
in Wild Cat Valley, St. James's in Turkey Valley, St. Michael's 
in Pfoutz's Valley, and, in Snyder County, Zion's Church at 
McKee's Half-Falls. With regard to the charge, Rev. Davidson 
says : " There is certainly room in the charge for the doing of 
good, and there are indeed many things to encourage. On the 
other hand, there are also many things to discourage. I am re- 
solved to do all 1 can to promote the glory of God in seeking the 
salvation of immortal souls. I have to labor very hard. Gene- 
rally I preach three times every Sabbath. At Liverpool infidelity 
stares me in the face, and I am sometimes discouraged ; but I 
have the promise of the Savior : ' Behold, I am with thee,' and I 
can see a change for the better." 

In May, 1862, Mr. Jeremiah Hall, as delegate, represented the 
charge in Synod, at Selinsgrove, Pa. May the Lord bless the 
labors of the pastor of this charge, and pour out His Spirit on the 
members ! 

" Their hearts from things of earth remove, 
Sprinkle them, Lord, from sin and fear; 
Fix their affections all above, 
And lay up all their treasure there. 

" Give them an ear to hear thy word ; 
Thou speakest to the churches now ; 
And let all tongues confess their Lord, 
Let ev"ry knee to Jesus bow."" 



SECTION II. 

Christ's church ix wild cat valley, Liverpool township. 

This church is located in a beautiful and fertile valley in Li- 
verpool Township, and about five miles southwest from the town 



CHAPTER V. 28d 

of Liverpool. A nuiiibev of the members in this valley had be- 
longed to St. Michael's in Pfoutz's Valley before they had a church 
of their own. A few of them had also been members at Newport. 
They were occasionally visited by Father Heim and perhaps, also, 
by the pastor of the Bloomfield charge. These ministers preached 
for them at Grubb's School-house. A suitable house of worship 
was much needed. Hence, during the summer of 1844, they 
united in erecting a church-edifice. This church was consecrated 
to the service of Grod on Sunday, the 8th of June, 1845, and re- 
ceived the distinctive name of Christ's Church. On this occa- 
sion there was preaching in the German and English languages, 
but who the officiating clergymen were we cannot tell. We pre- 
sume Father Heim and Eev. Levi T. Williams were present. The 
church is a substantial frame building, capable of accommodating 
about two hundred and fifty persons, and both externally and in- 
ternally presents a neat appearance. The congregation remained 
unorganized and had no regular supply of Lutheran preaching 
until the beginning of LS47, when the 

Hev. William Weave)- 

took charge of it, and served it for four years. He preached here 
regularly once every three weeks. It is to be regretted that the 
pastor could not preach German occasionally for the large number 
of members who understood that language best. We have no 
record of confirmations, and are therefore unable to state who or 
how many were added to the membership by Rev. Weaver, or 
what success attended his labors here. He resigned in the begin- 
ning of 1851. Then, for the succeeding five years, the congre- 
gation had no preaching by a Lutheran minister, and as a conse- 
quence the members became scattered and some of them were 
drawn into other connections. HencO; in October, 1856, when 
the 

Rev. Josiah Zimmerman, 

as missionary, first visited the congregation, he found it to consist 
of only twelve Lutheran members. He preached for this small 
congregation two years and a half. Though he confirmed none 



284 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

here, lie nevertheless prepared the wny for his successor, and thus 
much good was accomplished by him. He resigned on the 1st 
of April, 1859, and in August following, he was succeeded by the 

Rev. Jacob A. HacJcenherger, 
whose labors here, as elsewhere in the charge, were attended with 
such marked success. In the fall of 1859, Rev. Hackenberger 
held at this place a protracted meeting, which resulted in the 
hopeful conversion of from thirty to forty souls. The congregation 
was very much revived by this visitation of Divine grace from on 
high. The subjects of this revival were for some months care- 
fully instructed in the doctrines of our holy religion as they are 
set forth in the Catechism, and in the spring of 1860, the follow- 
ing persons were confirmed : 

Henry H. Server, Floranna Grubb, 

William M. Grubb, Susanna Hoffman, 

Samuel Keen, Elmira Grubb, 

"William A. Grubb, Louisa Grubb, 

David Baker, Amelia "Wagner, 

Catharine Killinger, Sarah A. Reen, 

Elizabeth Wagner, Harriet Reen, 

Mary A. Long, Mrs. Jane Crane, 

Mary Roush, Violina Buchanan, 

Sarah Jane Grubb, Isabella A. Grubb, 

Margaret Kepncr, Mary Lenig, 

Margaret Asper, Sarah E. Lindsey. 

By this accession of members the congregation was encouraged 
and strengthened much, and many who had hitherto stood aloof 
now rallied around the standard of the Cross. The interest of 
some in the prosperity of Zion was revived, and a number who 
had strayed from the fold of Christ were reclaimed and through 
the grace of God made glad in the fellowship of saints and the 
hope of glory. Truly such seasons of refreshing from the Lord 
are as the rains of heaven upon the wilted plants of earth. 

On the 7th of April, 1861, the following three persons were 
confirmed : 



CHAPTER V. 285 

John Sweesy, David Troutman, Mrs. Elizabeth Troutman. 

Thus the number of members was increased. The Lord blessed 
the labors of his young servant greatly. In June, 1861, the con- 
gregation numbered sixty-one communicant members. For the 
long night of destitution, may this congregation enjoy a long and 
glorious day of rich Gospel blessings ! 

" Blest river of salvation, 

Pursue thine onward way; 
Flow thou to ev'ry nation, 
Nor in thy richness stay ; 

" Stay not till all the lowly 

Triumphant reach their home ; 
Stay not till al! the holy 
Proclaim, ' The Lord is come.' " 

On account of failing health, to the great regret of the mem- 
bers, Rev. Hackenberger resigned in August, 1861, having served 
the congregation faithfully and successfully for two years. The 
charge was then vacant about seven months. On the 1st of 
April, 1862, the 

Rev. John H. Davidson, 

the present pastor of the Liverpool charge, commenced his pasto- 
ral labors here. The congregation requires at this time an occa- 
sional sermon in the German language. Much may here be ac- 
complished for Christ and souls, and we humbly trust the labors 
of the pastor now in the field will not be in vain. 

" Onward in thy triumphant way, 
Thou message of the Holy One, 
Thy truth shall usher in the day. 
The reign of God's beloved Son." 



286 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

SECTION III. 
ST. Michael's church ix pfoutz's valley, greenwood towxship. 

This is one of the most fertile and beautiful valleys in Perry 
County, and was among the first in the county settled by the 
white race. The pioneers in this valley were chiefly of German 
origin, among the earliest of whom we find a large number. So 
soon as the Land-Office was opened, in February, 1755, they lo- 
cated large tracts of land, viz. : In 1755, Baltzer Schellhorn, Mi- 
chael Brochard, John Pfautzj* in 1762, Andrew Long; in 1768, 
Leonard Pfautz ; in 1772, Frederick Kehl, Henry Altsbach, Mar- 
tin Wain; in 1774, Michael Wild, Jacob Wild, Jacob Jobson ; 
in 1775, Mathias Blocker, John Kepler, David Cargill, Peter 
Hoofnngel, Frederick Harter, John Long, Jacob Nighman (^Ger- 
man, Nieman), Zacharias Spaugel, and a large number of others 
who located lands by authority from the Land-Office. Many 
others bought lands at the same time at second hand. Nearly 
the whole of the German-speaking population in the valley be- 
longed to the Lutheran Church, and they were the first in the 
county to enjoy the regular preaching of the Gospel and to organ-' 
ize themselves into a congregation. 

Soon after the close of the Indian incursions in 1764, they were 
occasionally visited by the messenger of the Gospel, but for want 
of documents we cannot give the names of the pioneer missiona- 
ries. Some time between 1770 and 1773 the congregation was 
regularly organized. The baptismal record commences in Octo- 
ber, 1774, when the 



* His land was "Eesurveyecl 13th November, 1774, in pursuance of an 
order from the Secretary's office in part of an original warrant to Thomas 
Kerton, dated 28th July, 1736, by the direction from the Secretary's office." 
Writ of location. These lands were not bought of the Indians before July, 
1754.. How the Provincial Government could issue warrants for land not yet 
purchased from the Indians, we cannot understand. Did the Government 
take advantage of the Indians ? Had the Indians cause for complaint on ac- 
count of unwarranted aggressions on their lands by the whites ? Had the In- 
difins not been provoked to vengeance ? 



CHAPTER V. ' 287 

Rev. Michael EnJerlin 
was pastor of the congregation, and who served it in the Gospel 
till April, 1789. The names of communicants do not appear in 
the record-book whilst he was pastor, though it is evident from 
the baptismal record that he administered the Lord's Supper in 
the congregation and admitted persons to membership by baptism 
and confirmation. From this baptismal record we will give the 
following names and extracts : 

" Baptized on the 30th of October, 1774, Mary Schwigerty, 
aged sixteen years, who was at the same time confirmed ; Eliza- 
beth Schwigerty, nineteen years old, baptized and confirmed at 
the same time; Mary Pfautz, aged seventeen years, was baptized 
and at the same time confirmed and received into the Christian 
communion. On the same day, George, son of George Gran (^En- 
glish, Crane), Mary Margaret, daughter of George Treeksel, and 
John, son of Jacob Kinsch, were baptized. In November, the 
same year, Christianna Barbara, daughter of Jacob Kinsch, was 
baptized." John Kepler and John Long stood as sponsors for 
these children. 

Two acres of ground, on part of which the pioneer settlers were 
buried, was conveyed by deed for the use of the congregation. 
As this deed is a document full of interest, by request we give it 
entire, as follows : 

" Tilts Indenture, made the fifteenth day of February in the 
year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy-six, by 
and between John Fonts of Greenwood Township in Cumberland 
County and Province of Pennsylvania of the one part, and John 
Long and Philip Huber and the whole Lutheran congregation of 
the township, county, and province aforesaid of the other part : 
Witnesseth, that the said John Fonts, for and in consideration of 
the sum of six pounds lawful money of Pennsylvania to him in 
hand paid by the said John Long and Philip Huber, the receipt 
whereof the said John Fonts doth hereby acknowledge, he the 
said John Fouts hath granted, bargained and sold, aliened and 
confirmed, and by these presents doth grant, bargain, sell, alien, 
and confirm unto the said John Long and Philip Huber, and for 



Z«S CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

the use of the said Lutheran congregation, their heirs and assigns 
forever, a certain piece and tract of laud in Greenwood Township 
aforesaid, and situate and joining John Long and William Patter- 
son's lands, and to contain two acres, to be laid out from a certain 
hickory corner-tree adjoining said Patterson and Long's lands, 
and to extend eight perches on said Long's line from said 
hickory corner and forty perches joining Patterson's line west- 
ward over a certain run coming out of Patterson's land, and also 
all trees, roads, underwoods, tithes, commons of common pastures, 
profits, commodities, advantages, hereditaments, ways, waters and 
appurtenances, and whatsoever to the said land belongeth or in 
anywise appertaining, and also the reversion and reversions, re- 
mainder and remainders, rents and services of the said premises 
and of every part thereof, and all the estate, right, title, interest, 
property, claim and demand whatsoever of him the said John 
Fonts of, in, and to the said piece and tract of land and premises 
and every part and parcel thereof, to have and to hold the said 
messuage and tract of land and all and singular the premises 
above mentioned and every part and parcel thereof with the ap- 
purtenances, unto the said John Long and Philip Huber and to 
the said Lutheran congregation, their heirs and assigns forever, 
and the said John Fonts, for himself and his heirs, executDrs and 
administrators and every of them, shall and will warrant and for- 
ever defend the said above mentioned two acres of land and every 
part and parcel thereof, with the appurtenances and premises to 
the same belonging, unto the said John Long and Philip Huber 
for them and their and the whole congregation's use, their heirs 
and assigns forever, from all manner of person or persons, claim 
or claims whatsoever lawfully claiming the same (the Honorable, 
the Proprietor's rights and dues, both principal, interest and quit- 
rents only excepted). In witness whereof the said John Fouts 
hath hereunto set his hand and seal the day and year first above 
written. N, B. John Fouts reserves the liberty to take the water 
through said two acres of land when convenient for said Fouts. 
Done before signing. 

" John Ppautz. [seal.] 



ciiAPTEa V. 289 

"Sealed and delivered in the 
presence of 

Michael Wild, 
John Crane, 
James Rafter. 

" Received, the, day and year first v^ithin written, the sum of 
six pounds of the within named John Long and Philip Huber, it 
being the full consideration-money within mentioned to be paid 
me. As witness my hand. 

"John Peautz. 
" Witness present : 

Michael Wild, 
John Crane, 
James Rafter." 

" Camherland County, ss. 

" Before the subscriber, one of the Justices of the Court of 
Common Pleas for said County, personally appeared John Pfautz, 
senior party to the above Indenture, and acknowledged the same 
as his act and deed, and that he subscribed his respective name 
and allowed the same should be recorded for the use within men- 
tioned. Witness my hand and seal, June 13, 1788. 

"James McMurray. [seal.]" 

Previous to the time this deed was executed, a large school- 
house had been erected on this parcel of ground, and here the 
early settlers worshipped from about 1770 to 1798, when St. 
Michael's Church was erected. Before the erection of the school- 
house, and immediately after the last incursion of the Indians, in 
1763, when so many of the settlers were massacred so cruelly, 
they worshipped in private dwellings at different places in the 
valley. At this place, also, the dead in the whole valley were 
buried. For fear of a surprise by the relentless Indians, the men 
in those early days usually walked in file with guns on their 
shoulders on funeral occasions, and on occasions of divine wor- 
ship they always assembled well armed to resist the wily foe. We 
are informed that a number, who were murdered by the Indians, 
25 



290 CHURCHES between the mountains, 

lie buried in the graveyard of St, Michael's Church. No grave- 
yard, and no place of regular worship in Perry County, is as old 
as this, and none that has connected with it so many tales of deep 
interest. And the descendants of those pioneer fathers, still re- 
siding in Pfoutz's Valley, may well look upon this ancient and 
hallowed spot with an unusual degree of respect and regard. 
For more than one hundrpd years have the ashes of their fathers 
slumbered in this venerable graveyard ; and here God was wor- 
shipped in prayer and hymns of praise, and the word of eternal 
life was preached, when the savage yell of the cruel Indian 
sounded on every hill-top and sent terror to every heart. If we 
are not misinformed, the ancient hickory tree, mentioned in the 
deed as the corner of the church-land, was the tree to which some 
of the pioneer fathers were tied by the Indians and made the 
target of the deadly arrow. Here or close by they were buried, 
and thus the graveyard commenced. From worshipping Grod they 
went to the grave. Who can forget this and not cherish venera- 
tion for this place ? That hickory tree, we are told, still remains. 
We say, let it stand. It has a story of deep interest to tell. 

The members of the Church in this valley were at that time 
supplied with preaching by ministers who resided on the east of 
the Susquehanna. They also met often in a private capacity for 
singing and prayer. 

As it may be of interest to many, we will subjoin the names of 
the fathers who had children baptized during the last century in 
Pfoutz's Valley. We give the name of the father only, and only 
when it first occurs. In 1775, Benjamin Kepler, John Kepler; 
in 1776, Sebastian Schiid (Shade), John Philip, John Davis, 
Martin Hauser, Michael Pfautz ; [" A slave by the name of Bob 
or Robert, and his wife, also a slave, were baptized on the 5th of 
July, 1776, and received as members of the Christian Church;"] 
in 1777, Nicholas Fredericks, George Hoffman; in 1778, Mi- 
chael Wilt, Jacob Banning, Robert Patterson, Jacob Seller, 
George Traxel ; in 1779, Abraham Kepler, John Long, Philip 
Strauss, *Henry Dubbs ; in 1780, Michael Quickel, John Kepner, 
Andrew Reutlinger, Adam Barner, Frederick Thomas, George 



CHAPTER V. 291 

Rexworthy; in 1781, James Crosbave ; in 1782, John Grain 
(Crane), Henry Bull, George Leonbard; in 1783, John Iscb; in 
1784, Henry Bacber; in 1785, John Eafter, Henry Ults (Ulsb), 
George Res, George Crane; in 1786, Thomas Kurtz; in 1787, 
Frederick Reinbard, Henry Dieben, John Sbuman ; in 1788, 
Cbristopber Kinny, Paul Heim ; in 1789, Jacob Long, Frederick 
Wendt (now written Wentz), David Zillich, Besides these names, 
we also find the following as sponsors : In 1774, Jacob Kepler ; 
in 1776, Philip Huber, Kraft Gost; in 1777, George Nagely; in 
1778, Frederick Resch, John Harter ; in 1785, George Wilt, 
Jacob Wagener, Jacob Long ; in 1787, Christopher Saber or 
Schaber; in 1788, Frederick Harter, Esq.; in 1789, Henry Wa- 
gener. From the 30th of October, 1774, to the 7th of July, 
1789, ninety-one baptisms were administered. The record says : 
^' All the above-named infants were baptized by Rev. Michael En- 
derlin, Evangelical Lutheran minister." After this the name of 
Rev. Enderlin does not appear in the record, and without doubt 
he visited the congregation no more. We have been informed 
that he resided in Lyken's Valley, Dauphin County, where he 
served congregations, and also extended his labors to the west of 
the Susquehanna in Pfautz's Valley, and to perhaps New Buffalo 
and other places in Sherman's Valley. The members of the con- 
gregation in Pfautz's Valley were comparatively numerous and the 
prospects were encouraging. In October, 1789, only a fevr months 
after Rev. Enderlin had resigned, the 

Rev. Maltliias Gi'mtzel 

took the congregation in charge. The record says he was an Ev- 
angelical Lutheran minister, and the last time his name appears 
in the record is on the 8th November, 1801. As above, we will 
give the names of the fathers only, who are not already named, 
and had infants baptized : In 1790, George Rudy, John Stehle ; 
in 1791, Christopher Ulsh ; in 1792, Andrew Fogel (now trans- 
lated into Bird), Samuel Meyer; in 1793, Peter Stots; in 1794, 
Frederick Wendt [Mr. Wendt's child was baptized, according to 
the record, '' by the Evangelical Lutheran minister, the 



292 ciiuRcnEs between the mountains. 

Rev. Jolin Frcdcriih Illeze."~\ 

There is no record of baptisms from August, 1794, to Decem- 
ber, 1797. In 1797, Samuel Duwall (Dewalt), Frederick Harter, 
Esq. ; in 1798, Jacob Wagener, John Luck or Luke [Mr. Luke's 
two children, as the record states, " were baptized by the Evan- 
gelical Lutheran preacher, the 

Rev. Henry Miller 

of Harrisburg,"] who also baptized an infant here in June, 1800. 
In 1799, " the Evangelical Lutheran minister, the 

Rev. Liuholg Koch, 

baptized two infants." In the record of burials we find the first 
recorded read thus : <' On the 31st of January, 1800, was buried 
in this graveyard, Rev. Ludwig Koch, an Evangelical Lutheran 
minister, aged thirty-eight years. The funeral sermon was preached 
by John Grabil from John U : 6." In May, 1800, the 

Rev. John Ilerhst 

of Carlisle took regular charge of the congregation, though he 
preached for it occasionally some years before. It seems from the 
names of ministers recorded, that there was no order in the ad- 
ministration of baptism so far as regularity of pastor was concerned. 
After 1794, and till 1801, Rev. Messrs. Giintzel, Hieze, Miller, 
Koch, and Herb.st, baptized, each of them, some children. In 
1800, Thomas Manwarring, Peter Limbert ; in 1801, Henry 
Grubb, Mathias Liichtenteller, Michal Amholtz, George Riegel, 
Abraham Oruer, Christian Mitchell, Henry Dimni, Peter Traub, 
William Everly, Christian Spahr; in 1802, Daniel Anthony, John 
Freyberger. From October, 1774, to November, 1803, one hun- 
dred and forty-seven inflmts were baptized here. As the names 
of the members will hereafter appear in the list of communicants 
and those received as members by confirmation, we need not give 
the names of parents who had children baptized. 

To 1800, the congregation worshipped in a large school-house 
erected on the church-land, and private dwellings at diiferent 



CHAPTER V. 293 

places in the valley. The need of a church was felt, as the con- 
gregation was large and prosperous. Fi'om the record-book we 
will transcribe the following, relating to the buying of the book 
and the erecting of St. Michael's Church, so called in memory of 
Rev. Michael Enderlin or Michael Pfautz : 

" This Church Protocal was bought in the year of Christ, Anno 
Domini, 1797, December the Sd, by the following men or mem- 
bers of Pfautz's Valley congregation, viz. : 

Frederick Harter, Esq., Elder of the Lutheran Church. 

Frederick Wendt, Deacon " " " 

Abraham Kuntz, John Kepner, 

John Long, Sen., Abraham Sypher, 

Martin Swartz, Jacob Kauifman, 
George Hoffman, Sen., George Hoffman, Jr., 

George Rudy, Marks Brinkly. 

'•' On the 19th of March, in the year 1798, the church-edifice 
was erected, and on the 25th of May, Anno 1800, being Sunday 
Exavdl, the church was consecrated by the ministerial preachers, 
the Rev. Johannes Herhst, on the part of the Lutherans, and Rev. 
George Gehtv^eit, on the part of the Reformed, and received the 
name 8t. MlchaeUs. Rev. J. Herbst's text was 1 Pet. 2 : 5, and 
Rev. G. Geistweit's was Acts 16 : 25-31. The hymn, introduc- 
tory of the divine services, was : Kommt her ihr Christen voUer 
Freud, ErzeMet Gotles freundlichheit ; Kommt her und lass't 
erldingen, ka." 

This was a log structure, about thirty-five by forty-five feet in 
size. The logs and other timbers are said to have been of the 
best quality. Inside there were three galleries on three sides ; 
the pulpit was high and supported by a post; and the seats had 
high and erect backs. For many years an organ occupied the gal- 
lery fronting the pulpit. This instrument was not played after 
about 1820 ; it was all out of tune, and went to ruin. The old 
church stood till 1847, when, dilapidated and unfit for use, it was 
removed and a new one erected on its site. A large graveyard, 
known as "The Old Graveyard," is attached to the church-pro- 



294 



CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 



perty. Here the early pioneers and first settlers of the valley buried 
their dead, and were buried themselves before old St. Michael's 
was erected, and since then this "God's acre" has been annually 
receiving the "remains of men," so that it covers at present a 
large space of ground. 

" On the 3d of May, Anno 1801, being Sunday Cantate, for 
the first time, in St. Michael's Church in Pfautz's Valley, the 
Lord's Supper was administered, and thirteen catechumens con- 
firmed by Rev. John Herbst of the Lutheran denomination. The 
names of the catechumens and communicants are as follows : 



John Wendt, 
Frederick Wendt, 
Jonathan Long, 
Michael Wilt, Jr., 
John Wagener, 
Adam Wilt, 
John Kepner, 



Catechumens. 

George Long, 
Christiana Swartz, 
Susanna Dimm, 
Elizabeth Miller, 
Mary Wilt, 
Susanna Long. 



Frederick Wendt, 
Matthias Swartz, Sen., 
Barbara Swartz, 
Martin Swartz, 
Charlotta Swartz, 
Christopher Walter, 
Henry Dimm, 
Henry Weiant, 
Andrew Meyer, 
Doratha Meyer, 
Anna Alts (Ulsh), widow, 
(Catharine Harter, " 
Margaret Stotz, 
Elizabeth Henrich, 



Commujii'cants. 

Anna Cath. Spengel, 
Catharine Long, 
Susanna Liimiller, 
Catharine Michael, 
Catharine Wilt, single, 
Catharine Long, " 

Christiana Kepner, " 
Elizabeth Kepner, " 
Mary Wagener, 
Christiana Walter, 

Wolf, 

the name not i 

corded." 



At this, the first communion in the church, the whole number 
of communicants was thirli/-nlne. Not one of these is now in the 



CHAPTER V. * 295 

land of the living; all have passed away with the rush of time, 
and now live in eternity, receiving the reward for their doings 
while on earth. Several years passed away before the couupu- 
nion was held again. 

In addition to the two acres of land already owned by the con- 
gregation, another acre was bought, as shown by the following 
deed of conveyance : 

'' This Indenture, made this twenty-second day of March, in 
the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and two, between 
John Long, Sen., of Greenwood Township, Cumberland County, 
and Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, yeoman, of the one part, 
and Frederick Harter, Esq., Frederick Wendt, and the whole 
Lutheran congregation of the aforesaid pLice, of the other part, 
Witnessefh, that the said John Long, Sen., for and in considera- 
tion of the sum of one dollar, lawful money of Pennsylvania, to 
him, the said John Long, Sen., in hand paid by the said Frederick 
Harter, Frederick Wendt, and the whole Lutheran congregation, 
the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, and himself there- 
with fully and entirely satisfied. Hath granted, bargained, sold, 
aliened, released and confirmed, and by these presents Doth 
grant, bargain, sell, alien, release and confirm unto the said 
Frederick Harter, Frederick Wendt, and the whole Lutheran 
congregation, their heirs and assigns, for the use of said congre- 
gation forever, a certain tract or piece of land, situate, lying, and 
being in Pfoutz's Valley, township, and county and commonwealth 
aforesaid, bee/inning at a post adjoining Philip Hoover's old line 
and church-ground, bought of John Pfouts, Sen., thence by land 
of said John Long, Sen., south seventy-six and a half degrees 
west forty perches and six-tenths of a perch to a post, thence south 
twenty-three degrees east eight perches to a white oak, thence to 
the church-ground bought of John Pfouts, Sen., north sixty-five 
degrees east forty perches to the post and place of beginning, 
containing one acre, being a part of a larger tract of three hun- 
dred and twenty-nine acres more or less, which by virtue of a 
warrant, bearing date the 3d of February, A. D. 1755, was sur- 



296 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE iMOUNTAINS. 

veyed unto a certain John Pfouts, Sen., the 17th day of July, 
1765, and whereas afterwards by a writ of Vcndtdoni Exponas 
of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, issued out of the Court of 
Common Pleas, held at Carlisle, for the County of Cumberland, 
the 22d day of April, 1785, and directed to Samuel Postlethwaith, 
then High Sherift" of said county, the said tract of one hundred 
acres more or less was sold by the said sheriff to a certain Sebas- 
tian Shade, the 27th day of May, A.D. 1786, for the considera- 
tion of one hundred and thirty-one pounds. And the said Sebas- 
tian Shade by his deed, dated the 21st day of July, 1786, 
conveyed the said tract mentioned in Sheriff's deed unto the said 
John Long, Sen., the 29th day of May, 1790, for the considera- 
tion of one hundred and fifty pounds. Noio knoio ye, that I, the 
said John Long, Sen., for myself, my heirs, executors and ad- 
ministrators, do hereby grant, bargain, sell, assign and set over 
all my right, title, claim, interest and demand of, in and to the 
above-mentioned and described tract of land of one acre aforesaid, 
together with all and singular the buildings and improvements, 
waters, water-courses, rights, liberties, privileges, hereditaments 
and appurtenances whatsoever thereunto belonging or in any wise 
appertaining, and the reversions and remainders, and the rents, 
issues, and profits thereof, to have and to hold the said described 
tract of one acre of land and premises hereby granted or men- 
tioned and intended so to be with the appurtenances, to the said 
Frederick Harter, Esq., Frederick Wendt, and the whole Luthe- 
ran congregation, and to their heirs and assigns, and to the only 
proper use, benefit and behoof of the said Lutheran congregation, 
their heirs and assigns forever; and the said John Long, Sen., 
and his heirs, doth hereby covenant, promise and agree to and 
with the said Frederick Harter, Esq., Frederick Wendt, and the 
whole Lutheran congregation, their heirs and assigns, that the 
said John Long, Sen., and his heirs, the said tract of land of one 
acre with the appurtenances hereby granted to the said Lutheran 
congregation, their heirs and assigns, against himself, the said 
John Long, Sen., and against his heirs, executors and adminis- 
trators, and against all manner of persons whatsoever lawfully 



CHAPTER V, 297 

claiming or to claim the same or any part thereof, by, from or 
under him, them or any of them, shall and will warrant and for- 
ever defend by these presents, the fee of the Commonwealth ex- 
cepted only. In witness whereof, I, the said John Long, Sen., to 
these presents have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and 
year first within mentioned. N. B. The said John Long excepts 
to take the water out of said acre where it suits him and his heirs. 
Done before signing. 

"John Long, [seal.] 
" Sealed, signed and delivered in 
the presence of 

Christopher Ulsch, 

GrEORGE RUDY. 

"Received, March 22d, 1802, of Frederick Harter, Esq., 
Frederick Wendt, and the Lutheran congregation, the sum of one 
dollar, being the full consideration-money mentioned in this In- 
denture. 

" John Long. 
" Testes : 

George Rudy, 
Christopher Ulsh. 

" Cumherland County, ss. 

" Before me the subscriber, one of the Justices of the Peace in 
and for said county, personally appeared the within-named John 
Long, and acknowledged the within instrument of writing to be 
his act and deed, and desired the same to be recorded as such. 
In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal, 
March 22d, 1802. 

" Frederick Barter, [seal.]" 

Thus the congregation was now in possession of three acres of 
land. It seems the design was that the proceeds of the land were 
to go towards the support of a school-master, who was also to lead 
singing in the church, and perhaps play the organ. A school- 
house stood on the church-land, and a congregational school was 



298 



CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 



for many years sustained here. The fothers made wise arrange- 
ments, and laid a deep and broad foundation ; but in after years 
those arrangements were not carried out, and no superstructure 
was raised on that foundation. 

" On the ISth of December, Anno 1803, being Sunday Ad- 
venfa, the Lord's Supper was administered by the Rev. John 
Hcrbst." This time there were tliirty-three communicants, 
namely : 



Frederick Wcndt, 
Catharine Wendt, 
Matthias Swartz, 
Barbara Swartz, 
John Long, the aged, 
George Weiant, 
Martin Michael, 
Henry Bragunner, 
Margaret Landis, 
Magdalene Wagner, widow, 
Anna Meyer, 
Catharine Long, 
George Hoffman, 
Jacob Long, 
Elizabeth Long, 
John Kepner, 
Christiana Walter, 



Jonathan Long, single, 
Henry Wagener, 
John Kepner, 
John Leffember, 
Mrs. Bragunner, 
Christiana Kepner, 
Matthias Griissle, 
Anna Mary Griissle, 
Joseph Frey, 
Elizabeth Frey, 
Susan Bragunner, daughter, 
Cath. Bragunner " 
Christian Kepner, 
i]lizabeth Kepner, 
Christiana Long, 
Magdalene Griissle. 



" On the 25th of March, Anno 1804, being Sunday Palmarum, 
eighteen catechumens were confirmed, and the Lord's Supper was 
administered by Rev. John Herbst, 



George Wendt, 
Henry Long, 
Frederick Frey, 
Joseph Frey, 
David Rambach, 



Catechumens. 

Barbara Long, 
Margaret Long, 
Christiana Wagener, 
Magdalene Wagener, 
Anna Galman, 



CHAPTER V. 299 

Adam Gallman, Margaret Kepler, 

David Kepler, Elizabeth Shurnan, 

Absalom Meyer, Sarah Ninmand, 

Elizabeth Machlin, Mary Klein. 

The follow Inrj memhers also communed : 

Frederick Harter, Esq., Michael Wilt, Jr., 

Margaret Harter, Henry Weiant, 

Frederick Wendt, Catharine Wagener, 

Catharine Wendt, Elizabeth Henrich (Henry), 

Matthias Swartz, Margaret Stuetz, widow, 

Barbara Swartz, Elizabeth Rambach, 

Joseph Frey, Mary Wilt, 

Elizabeth Frey, Elizabeth Gallman, 

Christian Spaar (Spahr), Catharine Streaer, 

Mary Spaar, Anna Meyer, 
Christopher Kanie (Kinney), x\nna Ulsh, widow, 

Anna Kinney, Catharine Roemer." 
Martin Swartz, 

The whole number of communicants at this time was forty- 
tltree. On the same day Rev. Herbst baptized three infants, and 
here his ministerial labors in the congregation closed. The con- 
gregation was then without regular preaching for about one year, 
except that the 

Rev. Frederick Sanno 
of Carlisle occasionally visited the members and preached for 
them, and in May, 1805, baptized two infants. In June of the 
same year (1805) the 

Rev. J. Conrad Walter 
of Middleburg, Snyder County, took the congregation in charge 
and served it for some ten years. The first time the Rev. Walter 
administered the Lord's Supper here was " on the 20th of Octo- 
ber, Anno 1805, it being Sunday Trmifatis," when forU/SPven 
members communed. In the list of communicants at this time, 
the names of the following persons appear for the first time as 



300 



CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 



members, viz., Matthias Blocher, Peter Swartz, Jacob Mavcks 
(Marx, now written March), and his wife Catharine, John Hahn 
and his wife Doratha, John Kepler and his wife, Jacob Kepler 
and his wife, Christian Kepler and his wife Margaret, Matthias 
Hahn, Magdalene Mickenit, Mary Bricks, Mary Fogel (now 
Bird), Anna Roth, Eve Seifer, Barbara Silks, George Hoffman, 
Hannah Galman, Elizabeth Orner, Elizabeth Machlin. 

"On the 28d November, Anno 1806, Sunday Trhiitafis, Rev. 
Walter administered the Lord's Supper here." This time there 
were nineteen communicants. The following names of members 
appear the first time : Christopher Walter, Jacob Regel, Eliza- 
beth Vorman. 

" On the 28th of June, Anno 1807, the following thh-ty-clyht 
catechumens were confirmed and the Lord's Supper was adminis- 
tored by Rev. Conrad Walter, it being the 5th Sunday Trlni- 
tatis. 

Catechumens who icei'e confirmed : 



Benjamin Cran (Crane), 

John Cran, 

Daniel Anthony, 

Jacob Bock (now Buck), 

Henry Alts(now written Ulsh), 

Daniel Frey, 

Abraham Frey, 

John Marx (now March), 

John Long, 

John Strauss, 

Andrew Ulsh, 

Matthias Stolleuberger, 

Catharine Ulsh (baptized), 

Elizabeth Anthony, 

Susanna Ulsh (baptized), 

Mary Long, 

Elizabeth Franck, 

Sarah Cran, 

Juliana Long, 



Rachel Galman, 
Catharine Galman, 
Maria Ulsh (baptized), 
Elizabeth Roeraer, 
Catharine Bock (Buck), 
Catharine Schmidt (Smith), 
Barbara Schwartz, 
Catharine Marx, 
Catharine Long, 
Elizabeth Kegel (Cagill), 
Catharine Ulsh, 
Catharine Weiland, 
Christiana Grassley, 
Eve Grassley, 
Maria Hildebrecht, 
Barbara Schuman (Shuman), 
Maria Walter, 
Christina Anthony, 
David Strauss. 



CHAPTER V. 



301 



'' With the above, the following members communed at the same 
time : 



Joseph Frey, 

Elizabeth Fi*ey, 

Henry Bragunner and his wife, 

Henry Frey and his wife, 

Frederick Wendt and wife, 

Christian Spaar (Spahr) and 

wife, 
John Kepner and wife, 
John Long, the aged, 
Christopher Walter, 
Peter Swartz and wife, 
Jacob Marx and wife, 
John Rafter, 
Philip Strauss and wife, 
John Swartz, 
Magdalene Stollenberger, 
Catharine Spengel, 
Elizabeth Rambach, 
Christina Walter, 



Elizabeth Shuiuan, 

Jacob Long and wife, 

Fanny Berner, 

Elizabeth Henrich (Henry), 

Mary Klein, 

Barbara Long, 

Daniel Anthony, 

Catharine Roenier, 

Anna Kenny (Kinny), 

John Hahn, 

Doratha Hahn, 

Matthias Hahn, 

Eve Seifer, 

Charlotta Swartz, 

Henry Hildebrocht, 

George Carl and wife, 

Matthias Swartz, 

Elizabeth Roth, 

Mrs. Landis." 



The whole number of communicants was eighty-four at this 
time. The congregation was increasing in membership and was 
in a flourishing condition. Of those who then communed but 
few, if any, are spared by time. All who then thronged the house 
of God and engaged in divine worship have passed away. 

On the 23d of October, 1808, Rev. Walter administered the 
Lord's Supper here to forty-eight communicants. The names of 
the following persons now first appear in the list as members of 
the church : Christian Mitchel and his wife Catharine, Henry 
Tiedeman, Catharine Shuman, Barbara Silks, Elizabeth Hette- 
rich, Doratha Umholtz. 

On the 8th of October, 1809, the Lord's Supper was adminis- 
tered to twenty communicants by Rev. Walter. Having received 
license to preach, in June of this year (1809), the 
26 



302 



CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 



Rev. George Heim, 
under the supervision of Rev. Walter and as his assistant, preached 
here alternately with Rev. Walter. 

"On the 13th of May, 1810, being Sunday Jubilate^ or the 
third Sunday after Easter, the following young persons, whom 
Rev. George Heim had catechized, were confirmed by Rev. Con- 
rad Walter, and the Lord's Supper was administered to them and 
the former members : 

Catechumens confirmed : 
Andrew Fogel (Bird), Anna Ulsh of Henry, 



Frederick Fogel, 
John Shuman, 
David Wendt (Wentz), 
John Mohrhart, 
John Spar (Spahr), 
Jacob Spar, 
Isaac Spar, 
Samuel Spar, 
John Kless (Cless), 
Susanna Kless, 



Anna Ulsh of Jacob, 

Magdalene Kepner, 

Mary Rothpautsch, 

Catharine Roomer, 

Catharine Meyer, 

EHzabeth Marx, 

Elizabeth Carl, 

Mary Kuntz, 

Christiana Kuntz, 

Margaret Westpahl (Westfall). 



The folloioing also communed : 
Henry Bragunner, Elizabeth Henrich, 



Catharine Bragunner, 

Matthias Swartz, 

Barbara Swartz, 

John Kepner, 

Christiana Kepner, 

Henry Ulsh, 

Anna Ulsh, 

Henry Ulsh, Jr., and his wife, 

Henry Hildebrecht, 

Mary Hildebrecht, 

Christian Mitchel, 

Christiana Mitchel, 

Henry Dimm, 



Margaret Stotz, 
Mary Fogel, 
Elizabeth Hetterich, 
Cath. Marx, 
Margaret Wilt, 
Christiana Swartz, 
Elis. Franck (Frank), 
Magdalene Stollenberger, 
Cath. Roemer, 
Catharine Walter, 
Christiana Kepner, 
Elis. Roemer, 
Susanna Ulsh, 



CHAPTER V. 303 

Susanna Dimm, George Weiant, 

Frederick Kless, Catharine Weiant, 

Catharine Wendt, Mary Detwiler, 

George Carl and wife, Catharine Halman, 

Barbara Silks, Adam Wilt. 
Christopher Walter, 

On the 2d of June, 1811, the Lord's Supper was administered 
by Rev. George Heim to twenty-eight communicants. This time 
the following names appear the first time in the list : William 
Sauer (Sour) and his wife Nancy, Susan Kess, Margaret Reding. 
For 1812 and '13, if the Lord's Supper was administered, the 
names of the communicants were not recorded in the church-book. 

On the 2d of October, 1814, the Lord's Supper was dispensed 
to forty-five communicants by Rev. C. Walter. In this list of 
communicants the following names appear for the first time : 
George Heilman, Eve Fisher, Elizabeth Schneider, Susan Hei*- 
man, Margaret Herman, Elizabeth Herman, Catharine Herman, 
Rachel Heilman, Catharine Heilman, Hannah Heilman. In June 
of this year (1814), Rev. George Heim having ceased to preach 
at this place in connection with Rev. Walter, his brother, the 

Rev. John William Heim, 

took charge of the congregation, and after having held commu- 
nion on the 2d of October, 1814, Rev. C. Walter also ceased to 
exercise pastoral care over the congregation. 

On the 10th of October, 1815, the Rev. J. William Heim ad- 
ministered the Lord's Supper to tioeniy-nine communicants. This 
time the following names first appear in the list of members : Philip 
vShrock, John Heim, Jacob Herman, John Heilman, Magdalene 
Leckron, Elizabeth Steehly. 

On the 2d of June, 1816, tuienty catechumens were confirmed 
and the Lord's Supper was administered by Rev. J. W. Heim. 
The whole number of communicants was sixty-eight. As this is 
the last list of members on record, we will give the names of all 
who communed this time, viz. : 



304 



CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 



Catechumens wJio were confirmed: 



Samuel Hoffman, 
Jacob Marx, 
Jacob Long, 
John Ulsh, 
Abraham Wilt, 
Joseph Meyer, 
George Schneider, 
Fronica Ulsh, 
Catharine Harter, 
Elizabeth Frey, 

The follovnng communed icith 

John Kepner and wife, 

Henry Bragunner, 

Joseph Frey and wife, 

George Weyond, 

William Saur (Sour) and wife, 

Jacob Marx, 

Jacob Marx and wife, 

Michael Wilt, 

Andrew Fogel, 

Jacob Herman and wife, 

Henry Hildebrecht and wife, 

Barbara Potter, 

Elizabeth Marx, 

Jacob Long and wife, 

John Steiner and wife, 

Henry Frey and wife, 

Henry Long and wife, 

Elizabeth Schneider, 

Margaret Rediner, 



Catharine Shuman, 
Catharine Wilt, 
Mary Saur (Sour), 
Magdalene Marx, 
Sabina Mitsehel, 
Susanna Wagner, 
Elizabeth Long, 
Elizabeth Ulsh, 
Lydia Marx, 
Barbara Wilt. 

fhe above catechumens : 

Margaret Wilt, 
Catharine Eberst, 
Barbara Z willing, 
Magdalene Leckron, 
Elizabeth Wilt, 
Elizabeth Herman, 
Margaret Wilt, 
Margaret Herman, 
Fanny Scholl, 
Catharine Schrock, 
Hannah Saur, 
Mary Ulsh, 
Catharine Herman, 
Susanna Herman, 
Catharine Hoffman, 
Catharine Marx, 
Christiana Fessler, 
Magdalene Stollenberger. 



It is said that Rev. J. W. Heim catechized at St. Michael's 
about once every three or four years, and that large classes of cate- 
chumens were confirmed in 1819, '22, and '25. In May, 1828, 



CHAPTER V. 305 

between twenty and twenty-five persons were confirmed, of whom 
the names of the following were furnished us from memory : 

Henry Harman, Miss Catharine Kleifman, 

Joel Huggins, " Elizabeth Kleffman, 

George Cline, " Catharine Cline, 

Peter Boose, " Catharine Cline, 

Mr. Schaefi'er, " Schaeffer, 

Miss Catharine Harman, " Fogel (Bird or Burd). 
" Hannah Miller, 

So far as we can learn anything to the contrary, the above class 
of catechumens was the last Rev. Heim confirmed here, and since 
then but few, if any, were added to the membership at St. Mi- 
chael's Church. 

The names of fathers who had infants baptized, but whose names 
do not appear anywhere else than in the baptismal record, we will 
now give when they occur first, viz. : In 1804, Henry Lehman, 
Conrad Klein, Peter Wolf; in 1805, John Bacher, Capt. John 
Jones, Michael Rau (Rowe) ; in 1806, John Baeshor, David 
Blocher, Leonard Klein, David Rambach ; in 1807, Abraham 
Orner, Mr. Dewor, Mathias Schwesy, Adam Elmacher, John 
Huggins, Michael Umholtz, Nicholas Heterick, Charles Frank; 
in 1808, Joseph Egly, Fred. Kless, Jacob Rotpautg; in 1809, 
Henry Bar (Bear), Benj. Bender, Jacob Gesett ; in 1810, Jacob 
Spahr, Jefferson Gowet, Christian Beasom, John Buchter; in 
1811, Joseph Morris, Mr. Lutz, Abraham Silks; in 1812, Chris- 
tian Grubb; in 1814, Jacob Harman, John Grubb; in 1815, 
Philip Evers, Henry Grubb, John Scholl ; in 1817, Robert Kil- 
patrick; in 1818, Gabriel Geiger, Abraham Grubb, George Til- 
man ; in 1819, Adam Heterick, Henry Straub ; in 1820, 
Samuel Weaver, Peter Straub ; in 1824, Solomon Keiser, Adam 
Hort, Jacob Esuh, George Seller, Adam Hollman ; in 1825, 
George Manly, John Gensel, Adam Costeter, John Burd (Fogel, 
Bird); in 1826, Henry Miller, Michael Shetterly; in 1827, Jo- 
seph Pontius; in 1828, Henry Stoler, Joel Fonestock, Daniel 
26- 



806 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

Keim ; and by Rev. Erlenmeyer one child, in 1839, — father's 
name, Augustus Kirchner. Here ends the baptismal record. 

From the record of deaths we will present a few extracts of in- 
terest : 

On the 31st of January, 1800, Rev. Ludwig Koch, Evangelical 
Lutheran minister, aged thirty-nine years, was buried in this grave- 
yard. The funeral sermon was preached by Rev. John Grabil (a 
Mennonite minister), from John 14 : G. 

On the 21st October, 1804, there was buried here Jacob Wag- 
gener, Sen., otherwise known as Indian Joekel (Indian Jack), a 
man aged seventy-five years. Mr. Waggener was noted for his 
successful conflicts with the Indians. 

On the 30th of April, 1807, Dr. Christopher Keiner was buried, 
aged seventy years. Rev. Walter preached the funeral sermon 
from Isa. 38 : 19. 

On the 17th of August, 1807, Jonathan Foutz, a son of Mi- 
chael Foutz, was buried here, aged fifteen years. He was shot by 
David Spar, a son of Christian Spar. 

On the 26th of April, 1812, Frederick Harter, Esq. (the first 
elder of St. Michael's Church) was buried here, aged fifty-five 
years. Rev. Peter Bieber preached the funeral sermon. The re- 
cord of deaths ends in 1820. 

" The names of the men who served as Church-Council of the 
church in Pfautz's Valley, called St. Michael's, namely: 

"In the year of Christ 1797, on the 8th of October, Frederick 
Harter, Esq., as Elder, and Frederick Wendt, as Deacon, were 
elected and installed, and served to June 8th, 1806. 

" On the 8th of June, 1806, Joseph Frey, as Elder, and Henry 
Bragunner, as Deacon, were elected and installed. 

" On the 23d of October, 1808, Joseph Frey and Frederick 
Harter, Esq., as Elders, and Henry Bragunner and Frederick 
Wendt, as Deacons, were elected and installed as Church-Council. 

" On the 25th of December, 1813, Henry Bragunner, as Elder, 
and Henry Dimm, as Deacon, were elected and installed as Church- 
Council. 

" On the 10th of August, 1817, Joseph Frey, as Elder, and 
Jonathan Long, were installed as Church-Council. 



CHAPTER V. 307 

"In the year 1S25, Adam Wilt, Elder, and Daniel Frey, Dea- 
con, were installed as Church- Council. 

" In the year 1827, Samuel Keim,. Elder, and Daniel Frey, 
Deacon, were elected and installed as the Church-Council." Here 
the record of installation of Church-Councils ends. 

To about 1828 the congregation was large and in a prosperous 
condition ; but soon after this, from various causes, it began to de- 
cline. A number of members moved out of Pfoutz's Valley. 
Some located in Turkey Valley, where they afterwards aided in 
establishing a congregation and building St. James's Church ; 
some settled in Wild Cat Valley and helped to form a congrega- 
tion and erect Christ's Church ; and others united in organizing 
a congregation at Millerstown. Thus, as but few or none were in 
the meantime added to the membership at St. Michael's, the con- 
gregation was by removals much reduced in strength. About this 
time, also, diiferent sects of the wildest stamp found their way into 
Pfoutz's Valley, and, as their manner is, did their utmost to alie- 
nate from the Church all they could, and as Father Heini resided 
at Loysville, some twenty miles off, and was overwhelmed with 
constant labors nearer at home, the weight of his influence was 
not brought to bear down these aggressions from without, and con- 
sequently from this cause the congregation sustained a great loss 
and may not soon recover from its effects. In 1831, Father Heim 
still served the following congregations, viz., Miffiintown, Tusca- 
rora (near Perryville), Zion's at Blain, Loysville, St. Peter's, 
Bloomfield, Mount Zion on Fishing Creek, Liverpool, and St. Mi- 
chael's in Pfoutz's Valley. How it was possible for Father Heim 
to serve so many and remote congregations, without in a great 
measure neglecting some of them, is beyond our ability to under- 
stand. Of course some of them were neglected, or, to say the 
least, did not receive that attention and pastoral oversight which 
their interests demanded, and we are sure St. Michael's was one 
of them, as will appear clearly from the sequel. This want of pas- 
toral care was a third cause of the rapid decline of the congrega- 
tion. Eev. Heim continued to preach occasionally at St. Mi- 
chael's until October, 1833, when by action of Synod 



308 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

Rev. C. G. Erlenmcyer 

was acknowledged as the regularly constituted pastor of the con- 
gregation. At this time the membership was already very much 
reduced, and seeing that but little could be accomplished, Rev. 
Erlenmeyer was inclined, two years afterward, to cease preaching 
here. For in October, 1835, the congregation sent a letter to 
Synod, recommending him as to his Christian walk and soundness 
in doctrine, and desiring at the same time that he might remain 
among them, as their pastor. We have no means of knowing 
what success attended his labors here ; but we have reason to be- 
lieve that he met with but little encouragement, for early in 183G 
he dissolved his pastoral relation to the congregation, though he 
may have preached an occasional sermon for the few remaining 
members for a few years after. Hence, in the minutes of Synod, 
September, 1836, we find the following action in relation to " a 
petition from St. ^Michael's Church in Pfoutz's Valley, formerly 
under the care of Rev. Erlenmeyer" — 

" Resolved, That the congregation be recommended to Candi- 
date Boyer of MiiHintown, that he take charge of it, and in case 
he cannot do so, then to visit it occasionally." This is the last 
notice of the congregation we find in the minutes of Synod, until 
about ten years after. We do not think Rev. Boyer visited the 
congregation often or for any length of time. Need we wonder 
that the members were scattered as sheep without a shepherd, and 
that the congregation was reduced to the point of extinction. For 
five or six years the house of worship stood unvisited by a minis- 
ter or by the members. 

Rev. Andrew Berg, 

who took charge at Liverpool in November, 1842, if we are 
not misinformed, for about six months visited and occasionally 
preached for the few scattered members still attached to St. Mi- 
chael's. But Rev. Berg resigned in June, 1843, and the mem- 
bers were again without preaching for about four years. Early in 
the beginning of 1847, the 



CHAPTER V. 309 



Rev. William Weaver 



located at Millerstown and took charge of this large and then desti- 
tute field. He found but three members belonging to the congre- 
gation of St. Michael's Church. Thus this congregation, once so 
large and flourishing, had now dwindled down to the very verge 
of extinction. Under the efficient ministry of Rev. Weaver, the 
few remaining members took courage, and some who had strayed 
off now returned, and all rallied around the standard of the Cross 
with new energy. lu order to permanent success, the necessity 
of a new house of worship was obvious to the pastor, as the old 
church, neglected and dilapidated, was wholly unfit for use. 
Hence, in the first instance, the chief efibrt of the pastor was put 
forth to secure a new church-edifice. In March, 184-7, a congre- 
gational meeting was held in old St. Michael's Church, when 
Messrs. David Kepner, Joseph Ulsh, Frederick Reinhard, John 
Ulsh and George Beaver were appointed the building committee 
and instructed to solicit subscriptions for the purpose of erecting 
the proposed new church. A sufficient amount was subscribed to 
justify the committee in prosecuting the enterprise. Messrs. Al- 
bright and Sweinford contracted for the carpenter work for six 
hundred and eighty dollars. The mason work was not included 
in this contract. Mr. George Beaver was appointed treasurer by 
the building committee. The old church was taken down and re- 
moved, and some time in June, 1847, the corner-stone was laid on 
the very site of the old church. The building was pushed rapidly 
on towards completion, and some time in the fall of the same year 
was consecrated the new St. Michael's Church, a substantial and 
well-arranged church-edifice. The congregation revived and the 
prospects were truly encouraging. As no records were made, we 
cannot say what the strength of the congregation was at this time, 
nor do we know how many, if any, were admitted to the member- 
ship whilst Rev. Weaver was pastor of the congregation. In the 
beginning of 1851, Rev. Weaver resigned, having served the con- 
gregation about four years. The members were then again with- 
out preaching for more than five years. During this time, except- 



310 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

ing the new church, as much was lost as Rev. Weaver had gained. 
No wonder that the members became discouraged. Some, how- 
ever, remained steadfast, hoping almost against hope. On the 1st 
of October, 1856, 

Rev. JosiaJi Zimmerman, 

as a home missionary for this destitute field, located at Millers- 
town and preached at St. Michael's regularly for one year ; but 
after that, giving up all as almost hopelessly lost, he preached here 
only occasionally. On the 1st of April, 1859, he resigned this 
field of labor, and was succeeded in August of the same year by the 

Rev. Jacob A. Hachenherger, 

who preached here occasionally. In a letter, dated December, 
1860, he says: "This congregation is at present in a sad condi- 
tion. The members are but few; and as the people are generally 
connected with the diiferent denominations and sects with which 
the Valley abounds, there is but a faint hope that the congregation 
will soon, if ever, regain what it lost in membership. It was once 
a flourishing congregation ; but it gave being to the congregation 
in Wild Cat Valley and the one in Turkey Valley. These two 
migrations so weakened St. Michael's congregation that I fear it 
can not be restored for some time and without much labor. It 
has, however, still an existence. None have been added to the 
membership for many years. I can find no congregational Con- 
stitution." The congregation had a Constitution, but we regret, 
that notwithstanding the many efforts made to find it, it has not 
yet been brought to light. In August, 1861, Rev. Hackenberger 
resigned, and then the 

Rev. William 0. Wilson, 

who had located at Millerstown in July previous, preached at St. 
Michael's about eight months, but without much encouragement. 
Some preaching in the German language is required by the mem- 
bers; but as he could not supply them in that language, and also 
because the congregation belongs properly to the Liverpool charge, 



CHAPTER V. 311 

he resigned it in March, 1862, and on the 1st of April following, 
the 

Rev. John H. Davidson, 

having taken charge of the Liverpool pastorate, commenced his 
ministerial labors here. The present energetic pastor can so well 
supply the members by preaching in both languages, and though 
the congregation is weak now, may we not cherish the pleasing 
hope that by perseverance and God's blessing on the faithful 
preaching of the word, St. Michael's congregation will at no dis- 
tant day revive, and rise, and shine in all its pristine glory I 

" Savior, visit thy plantation, 

Grant us, Lord, a gracious rain ! 
All will come to desolation. 
Unless thou return again : 

Lord, revive us, 
All our help must come from thee I" 



SECTION IV. 



ST. JAMES S CHURCH IX TURKEY VALLEY, GREENWOOD TOWNSHIP, 
JUNIATA COUNTY. 

This church stands on the Juniata side and near the line di- 
viding Juniata and Perry Counties, and as it belongs to the Liver- 
pool charge we will make a few passing remarks respecting it. So 
far as we can learn it was erected in 1852, is a frame structure, 
and not large or conveniently located. Most of the members in 
Turkey Valley had formerly belonged to St. Michael's iij Pfoutz's 
Valley. The congregation was small and for some years had only 
occasional preaching. On the 1st of October, 1856, the 

Rev. Josiali Zimmerman 

took charge of it. He then found here only six members of the 
Lutheran Church, constituting the congregation. He met, how- 



312 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

ever, with encouraging success. In a communication to us he 
says : *' In Turkey Valley I instructed an interesting class of cate- 
chumens, and on the 19th of April, 1857, the following persons 
were confirmed : 

Samuel Dimm, Adam Wilt, Mary Dimm, 

Jacob Dimm, Joseph Wilt, Sarah A. Dimm, 

John Minnium, Frederick Wilt, Lydia Minnium. 

Samuel Ilambaugh, Catharine Wilt, 

Daniel Ziegler, Hannah Bostwick, 

" Six of these persons were heads of families, and this accession 
to the congregation, which was very weak before, was of great im- 
portance. Afterwards I instructed another class, and on the 21st 
of March, 1858, the following six persons were confirmed : 

Henry Dimm, Nancy Jane Dimm, Susan Dimm, 
Reuben Heed, Elmira Jane Cox, Eve Eliz. Ziegler." 

Thus the congregation was revived and gathered strength, and 
much good was accomplished by Rev. Zimmerman. He resigned 
in April, 1859, having served the congregation in the Gospel for 
two years and a half, and was succeeded in August of the same 
year by the 

Rev. Jacob A. Hacl-enherger, 

who preached here once every two weeks. Whether any were or 
were not added to the membership whilst he was pastor, we are 
not informed. Having preached to the congregation for two years, 
he resigned in 1861. Immediately after this, the 

Rev. William 0. Wilson 

preached here occasionally, as a supply, until the Liverpool charge 
should have a pastor. On the 1st of April, 1862, the 

Rev. John H. Davidson 

accepted a call from the Liverpool pastorate, and has since been 
preaching here regularly once every two weeks. May we not hope 
that, enjoying the stated ministrations of the sanctuary, the con- 



CHAPTER V. 813 

gregation will now take courage and go forward in the work of 
the blessed Master. 

" Dearest Savior, help thy servant 
To proclaim thy wondrous love ! 
Pour thy grace upon this people, 
That they may thy love approve : 

Bless, bless them, 
From thy shining courts above." 



SECTION V. 

ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH AT McKEe's HALF-FALLS, IN SNYDER COUNTY. 

This church is located about six miles above Liverpool, on the 
Susquehanna, and near the village known as " McKee's Half- 
Falls," in Snyder County. The subscription for the erection of 
the church was drawn up in February, 1859, and was circulated 
with encouraging success. The following persons were elected as 
the building-committee, viz., Jonathan Weiser, President, Jere- 
miah B. Hall, Secretary, John M. Reise, Walter App, and George 
Snyder. The corner-stone was laid on the 29th of July, 1861, 
when Rev. Messrs, S. Domer, P. Born, and Gr. C. Erlenmeyer 
officiated, and the church was consecrated to the service of God 
on the 6th of October, 1861. Rev. Messrs. Lloyd Knight, G. C. 
Erlenmeyer, and C. H. Leinbach officiated on this occasion. This 
is an elegant brick structure, large and of imposing external ap- 
pearance, with a basement story below and surmounted by a cu- 
pola and bell. On the 1st of April, 1862, 

Rev. John H. Davidson, 

as its first pastor, took charge of the congregation. The congre- 
gation was regularly organized by him on the 10th of May follow- 
ing, when the first Church-Council was installed, and when the 
following persons were admitted to membership bj confirmation, 
27 



314 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

viz., F. W. Wallace, Jeremiah Hains, and Annie Hains. Eev. 
Davidson says : " This is the best congregation I have." The 
congregation consists of about eighty members. 

Hunter's Valley Pkeaching-Station. 

This is a beautiful valley southeast of Liverpool, stretching 
away from the west bank of the Susquehanna, in Perry County. 
In this valley a number of members reside, who usually attend 
preaching at Liverpool and constitute a large portion of the 
congregation there. But as they have a considerable distance to 
Liverpool, from 1847 to '51 Rev. W. Weaver preached for them 
occasionally in a school-house in the valley, and so did Rev. J. H. 
Hackenberger, and Rev. J. H. Davidson does the same at present. 
As the number of members is increasing here, a suitable house of 
worship will be required. May the kingdom of Christ come and 
extend from shore to shore ! 

" Jesus shall reign where'er the sun 
Does his successive journeys run .; 
His kingdom stretch from shore to shore, 
Till moons shall wax and wane no more." 



CHAPTER VI. 315 



CHAPTER VI. 

THE MILLERSTOWN CHARGE. 

For many years all the congregations between tlie Susque- 
hanna and Juniata Rivers constituted one charge, — a charge so 
large that no one man could serve with profit to the people or 
pleasure to himself. Seeing that it was labor lost to travel so 
large a field, in August, 1860, Rev. Hackenberger resigned Mil- 
lerstown and the stations on the Juniata, and confined his labors 
afterwards to Liverpool and the congregations more contiguous 
thereto on the Susquehanna. Thus a vacancy was made on the 
Juniata, which Synod supplied by the appointment of a missionary 
on the 6th of July, 1861, when it may be said that the Millers- 
town charge was properly constituted. 



SECTION I. 

ST. Samuel's church at millerstown. 

Millerstown, laid out in 1800, is on the northwest bank of the 
Juniata, where an Indian village stood in olden times. This is 
probably the oldest town in Perry County, and considerable busi- 
ness used to be done here, being located at the east end of a long 
range of mountain passes. At present it is in statu quo. Mem- 
bers of the Church resided here fifty years ago. They attended 
preaching at St. Michael's Church in Pfoutz's Valley, and so far 
as w^e know anything to the contrary, had no preaching by a 
minister of their own Church in town, till the beginning of 1817, 
when the 



316 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

Rev. William Weaver 

located here. Some of the members had hitherto belonged to St, 
Michael's Church, and some, living in town, and its vicinity, were 
as sheep without a shepherd. Rev. Weaver preached for them 
in a school-house in the borough of Millerstown, and, perhaps, 
had also the use of one of the churches for some time. His labors 
were successful, and the prospects were truly promising. In 
March, 1S50, a congregation was organized, and it is said that 
" upwards o^ forty persons united themselves in that organization." 
See page 275. On Saturday the 4th of January, 1851, six per- 
sons were admitted to membership by vote and certificate, and the 
following ten persons were confirmed : 

Lewis Acker, Miss Lydia Harman, 
Lewis Grubb, " Elizabeth Harman, 

Grubb, " Ann Eliza Harman, 

John Harman, " Hannah Puntius, 

Mrs. Mary Harman, " Sarah Jane Puntius. 

On Sunday, the 5th, the Lord's Supper was administered. In 
a few weeks after this. Rev. Weaver resigned. He had accom- 
plished a good work, and it is to be regretted that he did not 
stay longer among this people. The members labored under the 
disadvantage of not having a church-edifice of their own ; but at 
the very time they were agitating the subject of erecting a house 
of worship, their pastor resigned and no church was built. 

After Rev. Weaver had I'esigned, the Rev. J. Martin, then 
pastor of the Bloomfield charge, pi-eached an occasional sermon 
for the members at Millerstown till the spring of 1852. After 
this, the members had no preaching till the spring of 1854, when 
Rev. A. Height of Bloomfield visited them occasionally and 
preached for them in a school-house. At this time the prospects 
of building a church were flattering. A kind friend of the good 
cause offered to donate a desirable lot of ground for the purpose. 
But, then. Rev. Height ceased to preach in September of the 
same year, and thus the members were again destitute, and the 



CHAPTER VI. 317 

prospects of building a church vanished. On the 1st of October, 
1856, the 

Rev. Josi'ah Zimmerman 
located at Millerstown, as a missionary for the whole field extend- 
ing from river to river. He preached at this place regularly in 
a school-house, and had for some time also the use of one of the 
churches in town. On the 20th of February, 1857, he reoi'gan- 
ized the congregation with seven members, to which, soon after, 
fifteen more were added, so that the congregation then consisted 
of twenty-two members. Rev. Zimmerman says : " Soon after I 
came to Millerstown I organized a class of catechumens. I in- 
structed them in my study, and on the 12th of April, 1857, the 
following persons were confirmed : 

Ephraim Acker, Elizabeth Hall, 

Peter Hall, Sarah E. Hall, 

Samuel Rice, Elizabeth Jones, 

David Riehabaugh, Sarah R. Jones, 

John Slutterbach, Susan Marlatt, 

Mrs. Mary Ann Lyons, Sarah K. Riehabaugh, 

" Rambach, Mary A. Slutterbach." 

Sophia Rice, 

Rev. Zimmerman accomplished a good work. When he re- 
signed, on the 1st of April, 1859, the congregation numbered 
Vihowt forty members. In August, 1859, the 

Rev. J. A. Hackenherger 
commenced to preach here, also in a school-house. But finding 
his field of labor too large to accomplish much good, he resigned, 
in August, 1860, all the preaching-places on the Juniata, and 
thus opened the way for the formation of the Millerstown charge. 
For nearly a year the members here had then no preaching. In 
May, 1861, Synod requested the pastor of the newly-formed 
Thompsontown charge to supply the congregation at Millerstown ; 
but the pastor of that charge found himself unable to comply with 
this request. Synod's Committee on Home Missions then secured 
27 X- 



318 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

a missionary for this destitute field. On the 6th of July, 1861, 
the 

Rev. William 0. Wilson, 

the present pastor, located at Millerstown and commenced his 
pastoral labors. For the first year he received ^150 of the Synod's 
missionary funds. For some time he explored the field and 
preached at a number of places, some of which he afterwards 
gave up and concentrated his labors to fewer points. At Millers- 
town he has hitherto been preaching in the new school-house or 
academy. A church was wanted very much to insure success. 
Hence, efforts were soon made to build one. For this purpose 
Mr. John Kinter very generously donated a lot of ground near 
the borough of Millerstown, and preparation was made to erect a 
church. On Wednesday evening the 25th of September, 1861, 
Eev. P. M. Rightmcyer preached in the Methodist Episcopal 
Church from Eph. 6 : 10-12. At the same place, on the 26th, 
Rev. D. H. Focht preached a sermon suitable to the occasion 
from Eph. 2 : 19-22. The assembly proceeded then to the site 
of the foundation of Samuel's Evangelical Lutheran Church, 
the documents were deposited, and the corner-stone laid in the 
usual way.* The building is to be frame, and thirtij-five \>y forty 
feet in size. 

On the 29th of December, 1861, the congregation was organ- 
ized once more. On this occasion the Rev. \\\ H. Diven assisted 
the pastor, and the following paper was approved and subscribed: 

" We, the undersigned, now regular members of the neighboring 
Evangelical Lutheran congregations, and in good standing in the 
same, living at Millerstown and its vicinity. Perry County, Pa., 
deeply sensible of thanece,ssity of having the Gospel of Jesus Christ 
regularly preached in our midst, of having our children instructed 
in the doctrines of the Christian religion, and of havins; the sacra- 



* Excepting names and dates, the declaration with the documents was the 
same as that deposited in the corner-stone of the Centre Evangelical Lutheran 
Church (see next Section), and need therefore not be inserted here. 



CHAPTER VI. 319 

ments administered accordino- to the command of God's word, do, 
on this Sunday the 29th of December, A. D. 1861, organize our- 
selves into an Evangelical Lutheran congregation, by electing an 
Elder or Elders and Deacons, holding the Bible as our only infolli- 
ble and inspired rule of faith and practice, affirming our assent to 
the doctrinal basis of the Synod of Central Pennsylvania, and of 
the General Synod of the Lutheran Church in the United States, 
and adopting the Formula of said General Synod, or a Constitu- 
tion consistent therewith as our rule of government and discipline. 
In doing this we subscribe our names as members of Samuel's 
Evangelical Lutheran Church, looking to Almighty God for his 
bhssing upon this our humble undertaking, and praying that his 
word among us may have free course, run and be glorified, sin- 
ners be converted, saints be edified, and this congregation be per- 
petuated from generation to generation, till time be no more, 
through Jesus Christ, to whom, with the Father and Holy Spirit, 
be praise and glory, honor and thanksgiving, now and forever. 
Amen. Signed by 

Samuel S. Taylor, Susan Marlatt, 

Ephraim Acker, Caroline Freeburn, 

Samuel H. Klefi"man, Elizabeth Kleifman, 

Jacob Slutterbach, Lydia Ann Acker, 

Mary A. Slutterbach, Henry Weiland, 

John Slutterbach, Mary Slutterbach." 

Hannah Taylor, 

From the above number, and on the same day, the following 
brethren were elected and installed as the officers of the congre- 
gation, viz., 

Samuel S. Taylor, Elder. 
Ephraim Acker, 1 year, ^ 

Samuel H. Kleffman, 2 years, J 

On the '27th of April, 1862, Mrs. Hannah Harraan, Mrs. Elmira 
Jane Wright, and Mrs. Mary Louder, were received as members 
by certificate. 

In May, 1862, Mr. S. S. Taylor, as delegate, represented the 



320 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

cbarge in Synod at Selinsgrove, Pa., and Synod promised to 
advance $200 from its missionary funds towards the mission the 
coming year. 

The new church it is expected will be ready for consecration 
in August of this year, 1862. The congregation has suffered 
much for want of a house of worship, and has struggled hard to 
build one. Now, however, the long-desired and much-needed 
object is nearly reached. We trust a brighter day will now dawn 
for this long-distracted and neglected congregation, and that it will 
now enjoy the stated ministrations of the sanctuary, and be per- 
manent in its growth. 

The present pastor has hitherto labored amid innumerable diffi- 
culties in the charge, growing out of a want of church-edifices and 
of an adequate support. He labored hard and endured much self- 
denial, besides suffering severe affliction in his own person and 
family ; but, as a good soldier, he prosecuted his labors with 
patience and sowed with tears, and, under God, he has accom- 
plished a good work. The charge is now established permanently 
and order is brought out of chaos. May the Lord of the harvest 
bless the pastor and congregations, 

" Mighty Savior, spread thy Gospel, 
Win and conquer, never cease ; 
May thy lasting, wide dominions 
Multiply and still increase ; 

Sway thy sceptre, 
Savior, all the world around." 



SECTION II. 

CENTRE EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH IN BUFFALO TOWNSHIP. 

The narrow valley lying between Juniata and Susquehanna 
Rivers, east of Newport, in Oliver and Buffalo Townships, was 
formerly and is still known as Buck's or Brush Valley. Some of 



CHAPTER VI. 321 

the earliest settlers of this beautiful and fertile valley were mem- 
bers of the Lutheran Church. To 1833, Rev. J. W. Heim 
preached for them an occasional sermon at the east or Susque- 
hanna end of the valley. In October, 1833, Rev. C. Gr. Erlen- 
meyer took charge of the Liverpool pastorate, and for some time 
preached at Buck's School-house, near the Susquehanna, and at 
other places in the valley till 1842, In November, 1842, in con- 
nection with Liverpool, Petersburg, and some other places, Rev. 
Andrew Berg commenced to preach regularly at what was com- 
monly known as Buck's School-house, where, on the 24th of 
June, 1843, he confirmed the following persons : 

Jacob Bair, Sarah Bair, 

John Bair, Magdalene Bair, 

William Liddig, Mary Bair, 

Louisa A. Grum, Elizabeth Liddig, 

Elizabeth Werner, Susanna Liddig, 

Levina Werner, Catharine Albright, 

Immediately after the confirmation of these persons, and after 
he had preached here only about six months, to the great regret 
of the members. Rev. A. Berg resigned, and accepted a call from 
the Shrewsbury charge, York County, Pa. Thus the members 
were left destitute, and had no preaching by a minister of their 
own Church for a number of years. They gradually scattered as 
sheep without a shepherd. Some were gathered into other folds. 
In September, 1847, Rev. William Weaver took charge of the 
Liverpool pastorate, and, till 1851, preached occasionally at 
different places in this valley. 

All the above-named ministers preached at school-houses at 
diiferent points in the valley. The members had no church and 
were not organized into a congregation, and as they had preaching 
but seldom and at long intervals they remained scattered. So far 
as we can learn anything to the contrary, no Lutheran minister 
preached in this valley from 1851 to January, 1859, when the 
Rev, D. H. Focht first visited the members. During this time a 
number left the Church of their early love and choice, a few at- 



322 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

tended preaching occasionally at Newport and other places, and 
some lived in cold indifference and cared little about the interests 
of their souls. In the meantime a few families belonging to the 
Church moved into the valley. The want of preaching was deeply 
felt and often deplored by those who sought the good of their 
families and of their community. The members were few, scat- 
tered and weak, and wickedness abounded. It became evident 
to most, if not all the members, that the preaching of the Gospel 
was the only means to bring about among them a better state of 
things. Finally, after repeated solicitations by different persons 
in the valley, the 

Rev. D. H. Foclit, 

pastor of the Bloomfield Lutheran charge, consented to preach a 
sermon for them. An appointment was made for preaching at 
what was generally known as Huygins's School-house, about five 
miles east of Newport, in Buffalo Township, and about the centre 
of the valley. At this school-house. Rev. Focht accordingly 
preached the first time on Sunday evening, the 28d of January, 
1859, from Exodus 33 : 14. The attendance was good, and all 
being encouraged, by request, he left another appointment. Hence, 
at the same place, he preached the second time on Saturday 
evening, the 12th of February, from Matt^. 6:33; and the third 
time on Saturday evening, the 6th of March, from Rev. 3 : 20. 
Stimulated by these pastoral visits, a strong desire was manifested 
by the members to secure the stated preaching of the Gospel, and 
two of the brethren were appointed as a committee to meet the 
different church-councils of the Bloomfield charge, at their annual 
convention at Bloomfield on the 7th of May following, in order to 
secure part of the time of the pastor of that charge. 

On Saturday, the 7th of May, 1859, Messrs. Lewis Acker and 
John Gunderman met the church-councils in convention at Bloom- 
field, and in behalf of the members in Buffalo Township made ap- 
plication for part of the ministerial services of the pastor. After 
due consideration of all the circumstances connected with this 
application, it was 



CHAPTER VI. 323 

" Resolved, That the Lutheran congregation soon to be organ- 
ized in BuiFalo Township, be received as an integral part of the 
Bloomfield charge, and that our pastor may preach for said con- 
gregation as often as he finds it convenient, Provided that such 
arrangement does not conflict with our regular appointments, and 
Provided, further, that each member of said congregation pay, 
annually, towards the support of the Gospel in the charge, not 
less than one dollar, and as much more as each one is able/' 

ORGANIZATION OF CENTRE EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CONGREGATION. 

On Sunday, the 5th of June, 1859, at 2 o'clock P.M., the pastor 
preached at Huggins's ScJwol-house from Mark 16 : 15. After the 
sermon was delivered, the following declaration was read, signed, 
and the organization effected : 

" We, the undersigned, now regular members of the Church of 
Jesus Christ, and in good standing, living in Buffalo and Oliver 
Townships, Perry County, Pa., feeling deeply the necessity of 
having the Gospel of. our Lord Jesus Christ preached regularly 
among us, of having our children instructed and brought into 
fellowship with the Church, and the sacraments administered ac- 
cording to the command of Christ, and having obtained permission 
to organize ourselves into a regular congregation, and having been 
received as an integral part of the Bloomfield Evangelical Lutheran 
pastorate, JDo, on this Sunday, the 5th day of June, Anno Domini 
1859, in reliance on the great Head of the Church, organize and 
constitute ourselves an Evangelical Lutheran congregation, by 
electing an Elder or Elders and Deacons, and in so doing we 
adopt the Formula appended to the Lutheran Hymn-book, or a 
constitution consistent therewith, as the rule of our government 
and discipline, acknowledging the Holy Bible as our only infalli- 
ble rule of faith and practice, and adhering to the essential doc- 
trines of God's word as set forth in the Augsburg Confession, and 
as understood and taught by the Synod of Central Pennsylvania 
and the General Synod of the Lutheran Church in the United 
States. All this we do with a sole view to the glory of God the 



324 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, for our present and eternal good, 
the good of our children and that of the conimunity at large. 
Looking to Almighty God for his blessing on this our humble and 
sincerely devout undertaking, we hereunto subscribe our names, 
on the day aforesaid, as members of Centre Evangelical Lutheran 
congregation, in Buffalo Township, Perry County, Pa., praying 
that among us God's word may have free course, run, and be 
glorified in the edification, conversion, and final salvation of many 
souls, and that this congregation may prove a great blessing to 
many, and be perpetuated from generation to generation till time 
be no more, through Jesus Christ, our divine Lord and Master. 
Amen. Signed by 

John Moritz, Jacob Harris, John Gunderman, 

David Moritz, Appilonia Harris, John W. Silks, 

Elizabeth Moritz, Philip Peters, John Silks, 

Lewis Acker, Elizabeth Peters, Leviua Hetrick, 

Susan Acker, Reuben Hains, Louisa C. Huggins, 

Susan Eliz. Acker, Jacob Bair, Abraham Adams, 

Jacob E. Ziegler, Sarah Bair, Angeline Adams. 

The following brethren were then elected and installed as the 
officers of the congregation : 

John Moritz, Elder. 

Jacob Harris, for 1 year, ") 

T • A 1 r n r Deacons. 

Lewis Acker, tor 2 years, j 

The congregation being thus regularly- organized, the pastor 
preached thenceforth once every three weeks, alternately in the 
forenoon and afternoon, at Huggins's School-house and two or 
three times at Patterson's. The congregation requires an occa- 
sional sermon in the German language ; it will, however, not be 
long until no German will be required. Soon after the organiza- 
tion of the congregation, the pastor commenced, after every ser- 
mon he preached here, to lecture on a portion of the Catechism of 
the Church. This was deemed necessary, not only for the instruc- 



CHAPTER VI. 



325 



tion of the young and those not members, but especially for the 
menib_ers. 

On the 30th of December, 1859, at Huggins's School-house, a 
protracted meeting was commenced and continued till the 11th of 
January following. During this precious season of grace, it is 
supposed between twenty and twenty-five members and others 
were truly converted to God. A weekly prayer-meeting was then 
started, which has since been kept up regularly by the members, 
and is well attended. The Sunday-school is also well attended. 
The converts of the meeting were faithfully instructed for some 
time in the doctrines of our holy Christianity, and on the 24th of 
March, 1860, the following persons were confirmed : 

Adam Hetrick, Mrs. Susan Finton, 

George W. Huggins, " Hannah M. Ziegler, 

William H. Mowry (baptized). Miss Annetta Guslar, 

Mrs. Rebecca Moritz, '' " Susan Peters. 

" Awake, my soul, in joyful lays, 
And sing thy great Redeemer's praise; 
He justly claims a song from me, 
His loving-kindness, how free I" 

On Sunday, the 25th of March, the Lord's Supper was admin- 
istered, when twenty-nine persons communed. 

Much was said from time to time about building a church, and 
one was really very much needed ; but nothing was, however, done 
towards the accomplishment of an end so glorious. Soon after the 
present pastor commenced preaching here, and still more after the 
congregation was organized, it became evident to all the members 
that to the permanency and future prosperity of the congregation 
a church of their own and under their own control was required. 
In the school-house the congregation was subjected to great incon- 
venience and annoyance from various sources. Here, that order, 
becoming the worship of God, could not be preserved, and the in- 
terests of the congregation could not be secured. 

In accordance with previous announcement, a convention of the 
members was held on Monday, the 26th of March, at the house 
28 



326 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

of Mr. George W. Huggins, to take into consideration the pro- 
priety of erecting a cliurch. The following brethren were in at- 
tendance and voted, viz., Lewis Acker, John Bowers, Adam Het- 
rick, George W. Huggins, Jacob E. Zicgler, John Moritz, John 
Haines, Jacob Harris, Philip Peters, John Gundernian, Peter K. 
Lehr, and William H. Mowry. 

The pastor opened the business of the meeting with prayer. 
The object of the convention was then fully stated, and the bre- 
thren were exhorted to act deliberately, in harmony and love, and 
for the glory of God and the best interest of the congregation- 
After careful consideration, the following resolutions were unani- 
mously adopted : 

^'■Resolved, 1. That the majority of votes shall decide all ques- 
tions now to come before us." 

As the proposed church was to be located near the line between 
Buffalo and Oliver Townships, and about midway between Juniata 
and Susquehanna Rivers, and near the centre of the valley, it was 

" lienolved, 2. That the church be called Centre, and be exclu- 
sively Lutheran." 

" Resolved, 3. That the church be located in a corner of the 
upper field of Mr. Harris, at the cross-road between Messrs. Har- 
ris and Potter." 

^^ Resolved, 4. That three brethren be elected Trustees, who 
shall also be the building committee." Messrs. John Moritz, 
Lewis Acker and Jacob Harris were elected. 

'■^-Resolved, 5. That the church-edifice be thirty-five by forty 
feet in size, frame, and twelve feet in the clear." It is to be re- 
gretted that, on their own responsibility, the building committee 
afterwards reduced the dimensions to thirty by thirty-six feet. 

" Resolved, 6, That the building-committee contract with me- 
chanics for the erection of the church-edifice on such terms as 
shall, in their judgment, be best for all parties concerned." 

The following heading of a subscription was then drawn up, and 
S267 were at the time subscribed : 

" We, the undersigned subscribers, promise to pay in money, 
work or lumber, the respective sums opposite our names towards 



CHAPTER VI. 327 

erecting Centre Lutheran Church in Buffalo Township, Perry 
County, Pa., on land given for the purpose by Mr. Jacob Harris. 
Said church is to be used for the preaching of the Grospel of Jesus 
Christ in purity, and by the permission of the ivhole Church-Coun- 
cil other orthodox denominations may be allowed to preach in it a 
funeral sermon or an occasional sermon, provided such an occa- 
sional sermon does not cause difficulty and does not interfere with 
the regular appointments of the congregation. March 26th, 1860." 

The business of this convention was transacted with great una- 
nimity, in harmony and love. The brethren united with the pas- 
tor in prayer, and thus the meeting closed. All present took cour- 
age to pi'ess the enterprise forward to completion. 

On the 27th of April, the building committee contracted with 
Mr. Philip Peters to erect the church-edifice for five hundred and 
fifty dollars. 

The following congregational Constitution, "prepared by the pas- 
tor, and adopted by the congregation on the day therein named, 
together with the Formula appended to the Lutheran Hymn- 
Book, are the rule by which this congregation is to be governed 
and its discipline administered : 



CONSTITUTION OF CENTRE EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN 
CONGREGATION. 

Prear)ihle. 

Believing that order is necessary to the prosperity of every as- 
sociation, and that it is therefore the duty of every individual 
congregation to adopt such a form of government and discipline 
as shall be consistent with the precepts and spirit of the word of 
God, We, whose names are undersigned, do hereby, on this the 
15th day of June, A. D., 1860, solemnly adopt the doctrinal basis 
of the Synod of Central Pennsylvania and of the General Synod of 
the Lutheran Church in the United States, and pledge ourselves 
to God and each other to be governed by the following Constitu- 
tion : 



328 CHURCHES BETWflEN THE iMOUNTAINS. 

CHAPTER T. 

OF THE CnURCU, ITS NAME, DUTIES, AKD OFFICERS. 

Sec. 1. This church shall be known by the name of Centre 
Evangelical Lutheran Church, in Buffalo Township, Perry 
County, and State of Pennsylvania. 

Sec. 2. This church-edifice shall be used for the preaching of 
the Gospel of Jesus Christ in purity. By the permission of the 
whole Church-Council other orthodox denominations may be al- 
lowed to preach in this church a funeral sermon or an occasional 
sermon, provided such an occasional sermon does not cause diffi- 
culty and does not interfere with the regular appointments of the 
congregation. 

Sec. 3. This church shall be governed by the " Formula for 
the Government and Discipline of the Evangelical Lutheran 
Church in the United States," and by such by-laws as are consis- 
tent therewith. 

Sec. 4. The object of this church shall be to see that God's 
word, as contained in the Old and New Testament, be preached 
in purity, and that the sacraments be administered according to 
the command of Christ and the form of the General Synod of the 
Lutheran Church in the United States ; to labor for the purity of 
its members in faith and practice ; to instruct the children in the 
doctrines of our holy religion as set forth in the Catechism ; to 
support its pastor as Christ commands ; to make provision for its 
worthy poor; and to promote the kingdom of Christ in every 
scriptural way. 

Sec. 5. The officers of this church shall consist of the Pastor, 
Elders, Deacons and Trustees, whose respective duties are detailed 
in the following chapter. 

chapter II. 

OP THE PASTOR, ELDERS, DEACONS, AND TRUSTEES. 

Sec. 1. The Pastor or Bishop shall be a minister of good stand- 
ing, who cordially receives the doctrinal basis of this church, as 



CHAPTER VI. 329 

specified in the preamble of this Constitution, and who is a mem- 
ber of some Synod in connection with the General Synod of the 
Evangelical Lutheran Church in the United States ; and if he 
does not belong to the Synod of Central Pennsylvania when he 
takes charge of this congregation, he shall connect himself with 
said Synod at its next annual convention, and a refusal to do so 
shall be regarded as a resignation of the congregation. He shall 
perform the duties prescribed in Chap. 3 of the Formula. 

Sec. 2. The Elders shall diligently attend to the duties pre- 
scribed in Chap. 3, Sec. 4 of the Formula. 

Sec. 3. The Deacons shall be so elected that one of them re- 
tires every year from ofl&ce and another is chosen to fill his place. 
They shall perform the duties set forth in Chap. 3, Sec. 4 of the 
Formula. 

Sec. 4. The Trustees shall take care of the church property 
and see that it is kept in good repair; they shall take charge of 
all important papers and documents of the church; and they shall 
always be the building committee when any building is to be done. 

Sec. 5. No one shall be elected to any office of this church, who 
is not a member in full communion with this congregation, and 
who does not bear a good Christian character. 

Sec. 6. This congregation shall from time to time determine 
the number of its officers, but these shall in no case be less than 
one Elder, two Deacons, and three Trustees. 

Sec. 7. When persons have been elected to the office of Elder, 
Deacon or Trustee, they shall be regularly inducted into office by 
the pastor according to the form prescribed in the Liturgy of the 
General Synod. 



chapter III. 

OF THE CHURCH-COUNCIL. 

Sec. 1. The Church- Council, of which the pastor is ex officio 
chairman, shall consist of the Pastor and all the Elders and Dea- 
cons. 

28-"- 



3B0 CHURCHES between the mountains. 

Sec. 2. The Church-Council shall faithfully attend to all the 
duties specified in Chap. 4 of the Formula, and see to it that all 
things be done to the best interest of souls and the highest glory 
of God. 

Sec. 3. The Church-Council shall annually elect of their own 
number a Secretary, who shall keep a correct minute of the pro- 
ceedings of the Church-Council, a list of all the members of the 
church, record all infant and adult baptisms, confirmations, remo- 
vals and deaths. The Church-Council shall also elect a Treasurer 
annually, who shall receive all moneys belonging to the church, 
keep a correct account of the same, and annually or oftener, if the 
Church-Council desire it, present a full report on the state of the 
treasury. 

Sec. 4. After a careful examination, the Church-Council shall 
admit to membership such persons as they believe to be possessed 
of the following qualifications : 1. They must be obedient subjects 
of the grace of God, that is, they must be genuine Christians or 
satisfy the Church-Council that they are sincerely endeavoring by 
the use of the divinely appointed means to become such, and, 2. 
They shall have attended a course of lectures by the pastor on the 
Catechism of the Church, and none shall be considered fit sub- 
jects for confirmation or baptism who have not attended such a 
course of instruction, unless the Church-Council are satisfied that 
their attainments are adequate without such attendance. 

Sec. 5. The Church-Council shall admit members in the fol- 
lowing manner: 1. By the sacrament of baptism, those who were 
not baptized in infancy; 2. By the rite of confirmation, those 
who were baptized in infancy; 3. By the right hand of Christian 
fellowship, those who present a satisfactory certificate from the 
church with which they were formerly connected ; and 4. By a 
vote and the right hand of Christian fellowship, those who cannot 
procure such a certificate, but who, on examination, are found 
possessed of the qualifications specified in Sec. 4 of this Chapter. 

Sec. 6. When members of good standing remove from the 
bound of this congregation, the Church-Council shall, at the re- 
quest of the removing members, furnish them with a certificate of 



CHAPTER VI. 331 

their good standing; and the pastor shall call such members be- 
fore the congregation, pray with and for them, and in the name 
of the congregation dismiss them by the right hand of Christian 
sympathy and love. 

CHAPTER IV. 

OF CHTTRCn MEMBERS. 

Sec. 1. Every member of this congregation shall faithfully 
perform all the duties enjoined on him in Chap. 5 of the For- 
mula, and be governed by the provisions of said chapter of the 
Fonnula. 

Sec. 2. No member of this congregation shall engage in the 
manufacture or sale of intoxicating liquors as a beverage, or be- 
come partaker of the sins of others by renting houses for this 
purpose to those who are so engaged. 

CHAPTER V. 

OF ELECTIONS. 

Sec. 1. All elections for officers of the church shall be held 
according to Chap. 6 of the Formula. 

Sec. 2. In electing a pastor, not more than one minister shall 
be invited to preach and be voted for at the same time. 

CHAPTER VI. 

MISCELLANEOUS MATTERS. 

Sec. 1. This church shall have a prayer-meeting and Sabbath- 
school. The prayer-meeting shall be kept up regularly, meeting 
at least once a week, and shall be conducted according to Chap. 
7 of the Formula. -Of the Sabbat h-sdiool the Church-Council 
shall always be a committee, to act in concert with the superin- 
tendent and other officers of the school in promoting its interests 
and extending its usefulness. 



332 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

Sec. 2. This Constitution, together with the Formula ap- 
pended to our Lutheran Hymn-book, shall serve all the governing 
and disciplinary purposes of this church. 

Sec. 8. The Church-Council may, for their own purpose, make 
such by-laws as the welfare of the congregation may demand; 
provided, however, that such by-laws do not conflict with this 
Constitution and the Formula above mentioned. 

Sec. 4. But it is especially provided that no alterations or 
amendments can ever be made in this Constitution which would 
conflict with its doctrinal basis and Chap. 1, Sec. 1, as long as 
two regular members can be found who are opposed to such a 
change. 

Signed in behalf of the members of the congregation by : 

D. H. Focht, Pastor. Lewis Acker, ") „ 

. > Ueacons. 
John Moritz, Eider. Jacob Harris, J 



THE LAYIXG OF THE CORNER-STOXE OF CENTRE EVAXGELICAL LCTHERAN 
CHTRCH. 

The exercises connected with the laying of the corner-stone 
commenced on Friday evening, the loth of June. Seats were 
prepared in a shaded grove, a short distance from the site of the 
church, and here the Rev. G. M. Settlemoyer and the pastor 
addressed the assembly. 

On Saturday forenoon it rained. Hence, instead of preaching 
in the grove, the people assembled in the barn of Mr. Harris, and 
here, at 11 o'clock, a.m.. Rev. Settlemoyer preached a sermon in 
the German language, from Isa. 28 : 16; Eph. 2 : 20-22. The 
pastor followed him with a short discourse in the English lan- 
guage, from 1 Pet. 2:6. It had now ceased to rain. The 
assembly proceeded to the site of the church. Here a few appro- 
priate verses were sung. The constitution and the following 
paper were then read, and the documents named in said paper 
were deposited with a copy of the Constitution : 

^' In the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost. Amen. 
"1. The Centre Evangelical Lutheran congregation in Buffalo 



CHAPTER VI. 666 

Township, Perry County, Pennsylvania, deeply sensible of the 
want of a house of worship, resolved, in reliance on the aid of 
God and for the promotion of His glory, to erect this house, 
wherein the Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ is to be preached in 
purity, and the sacraments of the New Testament are to be ad- 
ministered according to the word of God, our only infallible guide 
in matters of faith and practice. 

"2. The doctrines to be preached and taught in this church 
shall be in strict and full accordance with the doctrinal basis of 
the Synod of Central Pennsylvania and of the General Synod of 
the Lutheran Church in the United States, and every doctrine or 
shade of doctrine that in any wise deviates from or conflicts with 
said basis is hereby forever excluded from this house. 

"3. The Formula of the General Synod of the Lutheran 
Church in the United States, together with the Constitution 
adopted by this congregation, shall be the rule for the government 
and discipline of the congregation worshipping in this house. 

"4. This house we build with an eye single to the glory of the 
Triune God, Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, for our present and 
eternal good, the good of our children and successors, and that of 
the community at large. 

" Having thus set forth the rule of our faith, the form of our 
government and discipline, and the end for which we erect this 
house, — 

"Be it therefore known to all to whom these presents shall 
come, that this, the corner-stone of Centre Evangelical Lutheran 
Church, in Buffalo Township, Perry County, and State of Penn- 
sylvania, was laid in the name of the Triune God on the sixteenth 
day of June, Anno Domini one thousand ei/jht hundred and sixty, 
and the eighty-fourth year of the Independence, James Buchanan 
being President of the United States, and William F. Packer, 
Governor of the State of Pennsylvania. And when the tooth of 
time shall have demolished these walls, and all those who aided 
in rearing them shall have gone to their graves, may those who 
shall uncover this stone learn from these papers and documents 
the religious belief and benevolent designs of their forefathers, 



334 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

and be thereby stimulated to prosecute and extend the great and 

glorious cause of the Divine Redeemer, to whom, with the Father 

and Holy Spirit, be given all praise and honor, thanksgiving and 

glory, both now and forever. Amen. 

" 1. The ministers present are — 

Rev. D. H. Focht, pastor of the congregation. 

Rev. Gr. M. Settlemoyer, pastor of the Loysville Lutheran 

charge. 

"2. The Church- Council consists of — 

Rev. D. H. Focht, Pastor. Mr. Lewis Acker, ] j. 

' . ' ^ Deacons. 

Mr. John IMoritz, Elder. Mr. Jacob Harris, ) 

"3. The Trustees axidi Building Committee are : Messrs. John 
Moritz, Lewis Acker, and Jacob Harris. 

"4. The contractor is Mr. Philip Peters. 

"5. The cZocH?72e?i^s deposited with this paper are, 1. The Holy 
Bible (English). 2. The Lutheran Hymn-book (English; re- 
vised edition; miniature). 3. Luther's Smaller Catechism (Eng- 
lish; General Synod's Gth edition). 4. The proceedings of the 
Fifth Annual Convention of the Synod of Central Pennsylvania. 
5. The proceedings of the Nineteenth Convention of the General 
Synod of the Lutheran Church in the United States. 6. Lu- 
theran Almanacs for the year 1860 (German and English). 7. 
The Lutheran Observer of June 1st, 1860. 8. The Lutheran 
Sunday-School Herald of April, 1860. 9. Lutherischer Kirchen- 
bote, den 8ten Juni, 1860. 10. A sketch of the history of the 
church, and a copy of the constitution of the congregation, 
11. A copy of each of the Perry County periodicals, namely: a. 
The People's Advocate and Perry County Democratic Press, of 
June 13th, 1860. b. The Perry County Freeman, of June 14th, 
1860. c. The Perry County Democrat, of June 14th, 1860. d. 
The Newport Gazette, of June 7th, 1860." 

All these documents having been carefully deposited, a short 
form from the Liturgy was read, after which Rev. Settlemoyer 
offered a prayer. A suitable hymn was then sung, and the as- 
sembly dismissed with the apostolic benediction. 

A table was spread in Mr. Harris' 'barn, and persons from a 



CHAPTER VI. 335 

distance, and all others, were cordially invited to partake of the 
provisions. At 2 o'clock, P.M., the men on the ground proceeded 
to raise the frame of the church, so that it was ready for the 
rafters. Rev. Settlemoyer having left, the pastor preached this 
evening at 6 o'clock, in the grove near the church, to a large 
congregation, frota Heb. 11 : 6. And also on Sunday, the 17th, 
at 10 o'clock, A.M., at the same place, he preached to a large and 
attentive audience, from Matt. 18 : 11. Here ended the ex- 
ercises connected with the laying of the cornerstone of Centre 
Lutheran Church. 

The church-edifice was pushed rapidly forward towards com- 
pletion. 

On Sunday, the 80th of September, the congregation worshipped 
the last time at Huggins's School-house, when the pastor preached 
from Luke 15 : 1-7. 



DEDICATION OF CENTRE EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH. 

The church-edifice being completed, the congregation assem- 
bled in it the first time for divine worship on Friday evening, the 
19th of October, 1860, when the pastor delivered a discourse 
based on Matt. 6:10, "Thy kingdom come." On Saturday, the 
20th, at 10 o'clock, a.m., the pastor preached the preparatory 
sermon in the German language, from Matt. 6 : 33, and was fol- 
lowed by a discourse based on John 7 : 37, in the English lan- 
guage, by Rev. .John W. Tressler. This evening Rev. Tressler 
preached from Ezek. 33 : 8. On Sunday, the 21st, at 10 o'clock 
a.m., the pastor preached the sermon of consecration in German, 
from Psalm 46 : 4, and Rev. Tressler preached in English from 
1 Tim. 5 : 8. By subscriptions and collections forty-six dollars 
were obtained. This amount covered about the liabilities of the 
congregation, and the church was paid for. The pastor then 
consecrated the church, according to the formula of the Liturgy, 
by the name of Centre Evangelical Lutheran Church. The work 
is done. "Bless the Lord, my soul !" At 3 o'clock, P.M., 
the pastor preached the sacramental sermons, in both languages. 



33(3 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

from John 19 : 30, "It is finished." The Lord's Supper was 
then administered to twenty-eight communicants. This evening 
Rev. Tressler preached from Heb. 2:3. Here closed the reli- 
gious exercises connected with the consecration of the church. 

The church-edifice is 36 by 30 feet in size, weather-boarded 
and painted white outside, is entered by two front doors, and the 
internal arrangement is convenient and judicious. The entire 
cost of the edifice, stoves, and other furniture, was about sis hun- 
dred and thirty dollars. 

Soon after the consecration of the church, the weekly prayer- 
meeting and Sunday-school were removed to it, and have since 
then been kept there, and are generally well attended. 

From the deed of convej'ance, written by Attorney J. Don L. 
Gantt, of Newport, we will give the following extracts : 

'' This Indenture, made the first day of January, A.D. 1861, 
between Jacob Harris, of the County of Perry, and State of 
Pennsylvania, yeoman, and Appilonia his wife, of the one part, 
and John Moritz, Lewis Acker, and Jacob Harris, all of said 
County and State, trustees of the Centre LiUlieran Church, in 
said County, of the second part, Witnesseth, that the said parties 
of the first part for and in consideration of the sum of one dollar, 
lawful money of the United States of America, to them in hand 
paid by the parties of the second part at or before the ensealing 
and delivery of these presents, the receipt whereof is hereby ac- 
knowledged, and also for the further consideration of the benefit 
and advantage arising from the preaching of the true Gospel in 
said Centre Lutheran Church, do grant, bargain, sell, &c., . . . 
all that certain lot of ground, situate, &e., . . . containing twenty- 
four square perches, &c. ; . . . said lot and church thereon erected 
to be held by the trustees aforesaid, and their successors, for the 
use of the Centre Evangelical Lutheran congregation, and none 
other, unless by permission of the whole Church-Council, who 
may, by their unanimous consent, permit the preaching of a 
funeral or other occasional sermon, provided such preaching does 
not cause disturbance or interfere with the regular appointments 
of the church, etc., ... to have and to hold the said lot of ground. 



CHAPTER VI. 



337 



buildings, &c., . . . unto the aforesaid parties of the second part, 
and their successors, &c." See Deed Book S., Vol. I, p. 315. 

Thus the members of the church in this valley, destitute of a 
preached Gospel so long a time and organized into a congregation 
only two years ago, have now a convenient and beautiful house of 
worship. May they prosper in piety as individuals and as a con- 
gregation ! and may the saving influences of the preached Gospel 
and the ordinances of God's house be the means of here leading 
many souls to Christ, now and for all time to come ! Amen. 

As the Bloomfield charge was so very large, and the Centre 
Church is nearer to Millerstown than to Bloomfield, Rev. Focht 
transferred Centre Lutheran Church to the Millerstown charge, 
and preached his last sermons on Sunday, the 24th of Novem- 
ber, 1861, at three o'clock p. M., from 1 Cor. 15 : 28, and in the 
evening from James 4 : 17, having preached for this dear people 
nearly three years. May God bless this congregation ! On the 
1st of December, 1861, the 

Rev. William 0. Wilson 
commenced preaching for this congregation in connection with the 
Millerstown charge. He lectured on the Catechism soon after, 
and in January following it pleased th« Lord to pour out his Spirit 
on the congregation, and a number professed to have experienced 
a change of heart. These were still further instructed, and on 
the 26th of April, 1862, the following persons were admitted to 
membership by confirmation : 

Daniel Hilbert, Mrs. Deborah Ann Hilbert, Miss Elvina Silks. 

" Smile, Lord, on each divine attempt 
To spread the Gospel's rays ; 
And build on sin's denaolish'd throne 
The temples of thy praise." 

Since tlie organization of the congregation in June, 1859, the 
following brethren have served as its officers : 

Ulders. 

John Moritz, . from June 5th, 1859, yet in office. 

29 



338 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

Trustees. 
John Moritz, . from March 2Gth, 1860, yet in office. 
Lewis Acker, . " " " 

Jacob Harris, . u u u 

Deacons. 
Lewis Acker, . from June 5th, 1859, to 1861. 
Jacob Harris, . " " " 1860. 

Jacob E. Ziegler, " " 1860, yet in office. 

Lewis Acker (re-elected), " 1861, " 



SECTION III. 

TUSCAUORA EVANGELICAL LUTHEliAN CONGREGATION IN RACCOON 
VALLEY, TUSCARORA TOWNSHIP. 

In Raccoon Valley, Tuscarora Township, about five miles west 
of Millerstown, and near Donally's Mill, at llice's or Bull's 
School-house, where a number of members resided, the 

Rev. Josiah Zimmerman 
preached occasionally from 1856 to 1859. The members here 
belong mostly to the Millerstown congregation. 

Rev. J. A. Ilachcnherjer 
also preached here occasionally for about one year, from August, 
1859 to '60. In July, 1861, when the 

Rev. William O. Wihon 
entered on his labors at Millerstown, he commenced to preach 
here once every two weeks, and met with encouraging success. 
After catechizing and preaching for some time, it became evident 
that the word of life awakened some souls. In October, a pro- 
tracted meeting was held, when the pastor was assisted by the 
Revs. P. M. Rightmeyer and W. H. Diven. A considerable 



CHAPTER VI. 339 

number professed to have passed from death to life. These were 
still further carefully instructed. It became apparent now that 
in order to permanent success a congregation must be organized. 
Hence, on Friday evening, the 29th of November, 1861, the liev. 
D. H. Focht, assisting the pastor, preached from Luke 7 : 37, 38, 
and on Saturday, the 30th, he preached from 1 Cor. 15 : 58. 
After sermon, the organization was effected in the following 
order : 

With the change of names and dates, the same form of organi- 
zation at Millerstown (see page 318) was adopted in organizing 
Tuscarora Evangelical Liitlieran congregation, and was subscribed 
by the following persons as members : 

William Rice, Sarah Droragold, 

John Ptice, Sophia Kerr, 

Levi T. Diener, Christiana Kain, 

Samuel Rice, Wilhelmina Trankler, 

Daniel Rice, Susan White, 

Adam Rice, Jemima Cath. Dromgold, 

Margaret Eliz. Rice, Amaretta J. Kain, 

Mary Ann Rice, Julianna Bowers, 

Mary Ann Rice, Godfrey Kain. 

From the above members, the following were elected and in- 
stalled as officers of the congregation : 

William Rice, Elder. 
John Rice, for 2 years. 



T • m -Tk- x" T r Deacons. 

Levi T. Diener, for 1 year. 

The following persons were then confirmed, and a number of 
infants baptized. 

David Mahaffey, Mary Cath. Jacobs, 

John Frey, Mary Malinda Rice, 

Daniel Macher (baptized), Catharine Rice, 

Lydia Ann Frey, Amaretta Jacobs. 
Elizabeth Jacobs, 

Thus the congregation was regularly organized. This evening 



340 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

Rev. Focht preached from 1 Tim. 1 : 15, and on Sunday fore- 
noon (December 1st) the communion sermon from Acts 18 : 21. 
Forty-six persons united then in celebrating the Lord's Supper. 
This evening Rev. Focht preached from 1 Cor. 16 : 22. Here 
ended the exercises connected with the organization of the con- 
gregation. 

A church-edifice is now very much needed by this congrega- 
tion, and we hope the members will before long build one. A 
Sunday-school was organized on the 18th of May, 1862. May 
the Lord bless pastor and people ! 

" Behold th' expected time draw near, 
The shades disperse, the dawn appear ; 
The barren wilderness assume 
The beauteous tints of Eden's bloom.'' 



SECTION IV. 

PREACIIING-STATIOXS IN CONNECTION WITH THE MILLERSTOWN CHARGE. 

1. Wri(jlit's School-house. Every two weeks Rev. Wilson 
preaches here, and the attendance is good. A Sunday-school 
has been organized and seems to be in a flourishing condition. 
This school-house is " located at the west end of Wild Cat Valley, 
about three miles east of Millerstown, and one mile and a half 
from Juniata River, in a grove on a hill by a small graveyard, 
where some of the Wrights lie buried." The location seems to 
be romantic, a fit place where to worship God. 

2. Kauffmans School-house. This is located in Little Foutz's 
Valley, about three miles north of Millerstown. Here Rev. Wil- 
son preaches once every two weeks on Thursday evening. He 
organized a Sunday-school at this place last spring. The pros- 
pects of doing good are encouraging. 

From the foregoing pages it will be seen that the Millerstown 



CHAPTER VI. 341 

charge is as yet in a formative state. For some time to come 
much hard labor and great self-denial will be required of the 
pastor. But the field is promising, there is abundance of mate- 
rial, and by patient perseverance in tilling the ground, an abun- 
dant harvest may be gathered into the kingdom of Christ. 

" Can -we, whose souls are lighted 

With -wisclom from on high, — 
Can we to men benighted 

The lamp of life deny ? 
Salvation, salvation, 

The joyful sound proclaim, 
Till earth's remotest nation 

Has learn'd Messiah's name." 



29* 



342 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 



CHAPTER VII. 

THE REV. JOHN WILLIAM HEIM. 

After what has been said, in the preceding chapters, respect- 
ing the labors of this eminently useful servant of the Lord, we 
need to add but a brief sketch of his life. It may be said, in 
truth, that the history of the Lutheran churches in Perry County 
and his life are so inseparably connected, that the former cannot 
be written without writing the latter. Our object will therefore 
be to endeavor to supply what may be wanting, and to connect 
the leading facts of his life, and thus present a general outline of 
the man, the Christian, and the minister of the Grospel. 

Jolin Georcje Hehn, the grandfather of the subject of this 
sketch, was a native of Wiirtemberg, Germany, and arrived on 
the shores of America in October, 1751.* He was the father of 
WiUiam Ileim, who settled in Mahanoy Township, Northumber- 
land County, Pa., in about 1780, and removed to Jackson Town- 
ship, Perry County, Pa , in 1815, and died here in 1856, at an 
advanced age.f 

* See I. D. Rupp's " Thirty Thousand Immigrants,''^ page 199. 

t " Died in Jackson Township, Perry County, Pa., on Sunday, the 2d of 
March, 1856, Mr. William Heim, aged ninety-five years. Mr. Ileim was 
the father of the Rev. John W Heim, who ministered so long and faithfully 
to the Lutheran Churches of the upper end of this county. In recording the 
death of this aged patriarch, we lose one of the links that connected us with 
the past. He was an honest man. the noblest work of God. Mr. Heim was 
the only surviving hero of our memorable revolutionary struggle living in this 
county. He could narrate many incidents of the long contest which resulted 
in the declaration of our independence. He asked the Government to reward 
him for his services, but he could furnish no evidence, except the existence 
of his name on the roll of his company. The State had given him a trifling 
sum." Peojile" s Advocate, of Perry County, March .5th, 1850. 



CHAPTER vir. 343 

John WilUam Heim, the oldest child and son of William and 
Elizabeth Heim, was born in Mahanoy Township, Northumber- 
land County, Pa., on the 8th of August, 1782. At an early age 
he was sent to school, and aided his father on the farm. At the 
age of seventeen, in 1799, he attended the catechetical lectures of 
the Rev. Henry Miller, by whom he was confirmed according to 
the custom of the Lutheran Church. Rev. Miller was at that 
time pastor of the Lutheran congregation at Harrisburg, and also 
occasionally visited the scattered and destitute members of the 
Church in the southwest part of Northumberland County. 

Although young Heim worked on his father's farm, he never- 
theless neglected no opportunity to improve his mind, and his 
proficiency was such that he was soon solicited to teach a common 
school. As a teacher he enjoyed additional advantages for study 
and self-improvement. He was known as a pious, studious, and 
most excellent instructor of children. He opened and closed his 
school every day with the singing of a hymn and the offering of a 
prayer, and the pupils were required to recite to him daily a 
given portion of the Catechism. The instruction he had received 
from his pastor in the catechetical class had sunk deep in his 
heart, and whilst engaged as teacher, and repeatedly reviewing 
the Catechism in the school-room, the Holy Spirit, accompanying 
the divine truth, convinced him " of sin, and of righteousness, 
and of judgment." He saw himself a vile sinner, undone, and 
deserving of no mercy. But in his lost condition, he remem- 
bered the precious promises of God's word, and, relying" with a 
believing heart on the merits of the death of Jesus Christ, he 
found peace to his troubled soul. He was a new-born man. With 
renewed zeal he now gave himself to the reading of pious and in- 
structive books, and to the doing of good by teaching others the 
fear of God. 

He gave bis hand in marriage to Miss Catharine Drenlcel,^ 

^ When about four years old, Catharine lost her mother under the most 
painful and melancholy circumstances. Her father resided on Penn's Creek, 
now in Snyder County. A marauding party of hostile Indians, in passing 
through that neighborhood, attacked the house of Mr. Drenkel, who was at 



344 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

who shared witli hira the joys and sorrows of a long life. She 
was noted for her piety, modesty, industry, and frugality. 

When that great, good, though almost unknown man, the Rev. 
Conrad Walter, became acquainted with Mr. Heim, he found him 
possessed of those qualities of heart and mind, which seemed to 
justify the propriety of urging him to prepare for more extended 
usefulness in the ministry of the Gospel. Mr. Heim took the 
subject into prayerful consideration, and after hesitating for some 
time, he said : " Here am I ; send me." 

In the year 1809, with a view to the ministry, Mr. Heim com- 
menced a course of study under the direction of Rev. Walter, who 
resided at Middleburg, Snyder County, and is said to have been 
an eminently pious and laborious, and highly talented and edu- 
cated minister. Under the guidance of this good and gifted man, 
Mr. Heim pursued a five years'course of theological training. Dur- 
ing this time, at short intervals, he taught school at Rowe's (^Ger- 
man, Rau's) Church, a few miles southeast of Middleburg, as a 
means to support his family. 

We have before us, in manuscript, fifty-two skeletons of ser- 
mons and part of a system of didactic theology, all of which are 
in Mr. Heim's handwriting, though they were evidently dictated 
by Rev. Walter, or copied from his manuscripts. The system of 
theology bears date, January 7th, 1813. Definitions of theologi- 
cal terms are given in Latin, and quotations from the Scriptures 
sometimes in the Greek and sometimes in the Hebrew languages. 
The whole production, as far as it goes, is thorough and exceed- 
ingly suggestive. The study of a concise system of theology like 
this, with verbal explanations, illustrations and amplifications, by 
such a man as Rev. Walter, would certainly be a good theological 

the time in the field at work. When he became aware of the perilous condi- 
tion of his family, he hastened to their rescue. But though he saved the life 
of Catharine, the wife and mother, a little brother and the babo in the cradle 
were cruelly murdered by the relentless savages. The mother was scalped by 
the Indians, and was buried with the two children on the bank of meandering 
Penn's Creek. The grave of these innocents, like that of Moses, is unknown. 
This statement we have from the lips of Mr. George Heim, and Mrs. Krosier, 
a granddaughter of the murdered mother. 



CHAPTER VII. 345 

preparation for the ministry. This was the kind of training Mr. 
Heim enjoyed for five years ; and this little book bears decided 
evidence to the high theological attainments of Rev. Walter as 
•well as to the sound and thorough theological instruction Mr. 
Heim received.* 

* Before geologists had surmised the great age of our globe, Rev. Walter, 
on purely biblical grounds, maintained that it was more than six thousand 
years old. Among other things, in the article De Creatione, he sets forth 
his views as follows : 

"How God created the world, reason knows not. The Bible teaches us 
that it was made out of nothing by the Son, John 1 : 3-10 ; Heb. 1 : 2-10. 

" The iisual explanation of the history of creation, namely, that God created 
the whole universe in six days about six thousand years ago, is unsatisfactory. 
For, 1. There is no evidence that Moses intended to give a history of the crea- 
tion of the whole universe. In Gen. verse 1, he speaks of the creation of the 
universe as a whole ; but in verse 2, and the verses following, only of our 
globe, and not of the universe. In verses 14-18, he does not speak of the 
creation of the celestial bodies, but only of their appointment or destination 
to a particular purpose. Gen. 9 : 13 ; 41 : 14 ; Exod. 4 : 16 ; Num. 10 ; 31 ; 
Isa. 55 : 4; Jer. 1:5. Hence Moses speaks here (in verse 2 and afterwards) 
not of the creation of the universe, but only of the remoulding or refitting of 
our globe. But, 2, This theory is encumbered with insuperable difficulties, 
for if we adopt it we must then admit, a. That in verse 1, ' heaven and 
earth' denote the materials out of which the universe of worlds was after- 
wards formed, b. That light was three days before the sun was made c. 
That night and day alternated before a sun was. d. That herb, grass, Ac, 
grew before the sun was made. e. That the work performed on the fourth 
day was immeasurably great as compared with that of other days. Our 
planet, a grain of dust, it would have required five days to fit out, whilst the 
sun, moon, and all the stars needed only one I N. B. The structure of our 
globe proves it to be older than six thousand years. What account, then, 
does Moses really give of the creation of our globe ? Aiisiaer. 1. That God 
created it, verse 1. 2. As to the time when it was created it is not stated. The 
phrase, ' in the beginning,' does not point out any definite time, John 1:1,2; 
Heb. 1 : 10. Our globe may be thousands of millions of years old; we know 
nothing for certain respecting Us age. 3. In verse 3, only the remoulding of 
our earth is described, and here our chronology begins. 4. Whether living 
beings dwelt on our globe before this remoulding of it took place, Moses does 
not inform us. That a change or changes took place, previous to the one of 
which Moses speaks, seems to receive countenance from 2 Pet. 3 : 5, 6. 5. 
Moses knows nothing of a chaos out of which, as some suppose, all things 
sprung into being. 6. This globe, before it was remoulded, was entirely 
covered with water, verse 2. Hence, everywhere the signs of a once existing 



346 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

Having completed the prescribed course of theological studies, 
Mr. Heim visited some congregations and preached for them a 
few times, so that they might be able to judge whether he would 
suit them or not. Hence, in the minutes of Synod, June, 1814, 
it is stated that '' The congregations at Lewistown, Mifflintown, 
in Tuscarora Valley and Greenwood Township, request that Mr. 
Heim, applicant for licensure, may be permitted to serve them as 
pastor, and they therefore pray Ministerium to give him a Can- 
didate's license. On motion, it was Resolved, That in ease Mr. 
Heim stands a satisfoctory examination, he be permitted to ac- 
cept a call from these congregations." 

Mr. Heim presented himself before the Synod of Pennsylvania, 
convened at Easton, Pa., and passed a satisfactory examination, 
and on the 8th of June, 1814, received license to preach. "The 
call from the congregations in Mifflin County, namely, Tuscarora 
[near Perryville, now Juniata County], Pfoutz's Valley [now in 
Perry County], Greenwood Township [probably New Buffalo], 
Lewistown, and Decatur Township [northeast of Lewistown], was 
now read, and on motion it was Resolved, That as Catechist, 
under the supervision of Pastor Walter, Rev. Heim have permis- 
sion to accept the call of the congregations aforesaid." 

Mr. Heim moved to Juniata County, on a parcel of ground on 
the old turnpike-road, about two miles east of Mifflintown. He 

sea are discovered. 7. The general remoulding of our globe took place in 
the following order : a. On the first day a powerful wind dispersed the dense 
vapors so that the rays of the sun could break and shine through them. The 
earth or globe was lightened, and therefore the alternate change of day and 
night began, b. On the second day still more vapors from the water ascended 
as clouds. Thus the atmosphere was formed, verse 6-10. c. On the third 
day the remaining waters on the globe sought their level, and from them dry 
land came forth. As the sun had since the firjt day warmed the earth, vege- 
tation was now brought forth, d. On the fourth day the ascended vapors had 
been so much dispersed that the sun, moon and stars could again be clearly 
seen. e. On the fifth day living creatures moved in the sea and in the air. 
/. On the sixth day the dry land was ready for all beasts — man last. 8. The 
days were either time-periods or natural days — the latter is the safest opi- 
nion." This may serve as a specimen of Rev. Walter's method of teaching. 
Of course verbal enlargements were made on each topic 



CHAPTER vir. 347 

entered on the discharge of his ministerial labors without delay. 
On the 18th of June, ten days after he had received license, he 
preached near New Buffalo in the forenoon, and at Liverpool in 
the afternoon of the same day ; on the 19th, he preached the first 
time at St. Michael's in Pfoutz's Valley and at Nieman's or St. 
John's Church ; on the 26th, he preached for the first time in 
Tuscarora Valley (Rice's Church) near Perryville and at St. 
Mary's Church at Mifflintown ; and on the 3d of July, he 
preached the first time in Decatur Township at Straub's Church, 
about six miles northeast of Lewistown, and in the afternoon of 
the same day at Lewistown. These eight congregations — three in 
Perry County, one in Snyder, two in Juniata, and two in Mifflin, 
— constituted his regular charge, and he preached to each congre- 
gation once every four weeks. We should think he had more 
than enough to do to supply this extended field of labor ; but we 
find that he added, from time to time, other congregations to his 
charge. Thus, on the 10th of September, 1814, he says: "I 
preached in Sherman's Valley from Matt. 16 : 24." This was 
probably at Bloomfield, and only on a visit. He preached also 
occasionally at what he calls "Stollenberger's School-house," some- 
where in the vicinity of Liverpool, and also at Snow's Church in 
Snyder County. He says: *' On the 18th of June, 1815, I 
preached for the first time at Lebanon Church (at Loysville) 
from Matt. 9 : 13," and " on the evening of the '22d of Decem- 
ber, the same year, at Thompsontown, from Eph. 5 : 14." On 
the 23d of May, 1816, he laid the corner-stone of Zion Church 
at Blain, and then preached also regularly there. Afterwards, in 
1817, he added also to his charge St. Peter's Church in Spring 
Township and Christ's Church at Bloomfield. Thus his charge 
now embraced all Mifflin County, all Juniata, and all Perry, ex- 
cepting Mount Zion Church on Fishing Creek; and from 1818 
to 1828, he had upwards of eighteen preaching-places to supply, 
some twelve of which were regularly organized congregations, and 
from thirty to forty miles apart. 

At the convention of Synod in June, 1819, at Baltimore, Eev. 
Heini received ordination. With patient perseverance and untir- 



348 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

ing zeal, he prosecuted from year to year the great and glorious 
mission his blessed Master had assigned him. 

In the spring of 1828, he ceased to preach at Levvistown and 
in Decatur Township, and moved from Juniata County to Loys- 
ville. Perry County, where the congregations had bought a par- 
sonage and about fifteen acres of land for the pastor's use. Some 
years after this, he bought a farm on Sherman's Creek, about two 
miles south of Loysville, on which he erected a large grist-mill. 
This enterprise resulted in great pecuniary loss to him, though 
he did not allow it to interfere in the discharge of his ministerial 
duties. Experience taught him that two things cannot be at- 
tended to at the same time without loss in one or the other. So 
he let his mill-property suffer, and gave himself to preaching 
Jesus to perishing sinners. 

In 1833, he resigned the congregations on the northeast of the 
Juniata River in order that the Liverpool charge might be formed, 
and in 1835, at the request of Synod, he gave up the congrega- 
tions he had hitherto served in Juniata County, so that his labors 
were hereafter confined to the congregations southwest of the Ju- 
niata in Perry County, namely, Blain, Loysville, St. Peter's, St. 
Andrew's (Shuman's), Bloomfield, and Fishing Creek. These 
six congregations, we should think, would certainly demand all 
his time and pastoral care ; but not so, — in 1840, he added to 
them St. John's (Bealor's), and in 1842 Ludolph's (Germany) 
Church, and visited occasionally a number of preaching-stations. 
These eight congregations he then retained and served faithfully 
till his Lord and Master said, " Well done, thou good and faith- 
ful servant; enter thou into the joy of thy Lord." 

In February, 1848, Father Heim sustained a severe loss in the 
death of his beloved wife, who had so long shared with him in all 
the changes of life, and upon whom, in his almost constant ab- 
sence from home, devolved the care of the family. This bereave- 
ment afllicted him sorely and preyed much on his mind, especially 
as he was himself feeling the weight of years gathering fast upon 
him. His companion was no more, and he became restless, be- 
cause he felt lonely. He, however, submitted his will to the 



CHAPTER vir. 349 

will of his Heavenly Father, and waited patiently till his change 
should come. He labored to the last, knowing that his labors 
would soon cease on earth forever. Thus death found him occu- 
pying the post the Lord had assigned him. On Sunday, the 16th 
of December, 1849, he preached his last sermon. His subject 
was a fit one — The Sane t (fie at ion of the Sahhath — with which to 
close the labors of life, and the discourse, it is said, was an able 
one. A few days after this, he set out to attend a funeral ; but 
on his way going, he became sick and was with difficulty per- 
suaded to return. He, however, returned home, and soon after 
took his bed, from which he arose no more. His disease was 
typhoid fever. He was conscious of the approach of death ; but 
he did not fear, and was ready and anxiously waiting to depart. 
He was patient amid all his suffering, resigned himself wholly to 
the will of his Heavenly Father, found rich consolation in the 
promises of God's word, had a sure hope of life eternal by faith 
in the atonement of the blessed Redeemer, and thus he calmly 
and sweetly fell asleep in Jesus, on Thursday evening at about 9 
o'clock, the 27th of December, 1849. 

On Saturday, the 29th, a great multitude of people assembled 
to pay the last tribute of respect to the remains of their aged 
pastor. They mourned as children for their departed father. His 
body was conveyed to the old church and placed in front of the 
pulpit, from which, for more than thirty-four years, he had preached 
the glorious Gospel of the Son of God. The Rev. Jacob Martin 
opened the funeral services in the English language, by preaching 
a suitable sermon from Heb. 15 : 7, 8. The Rev. C. H. Lein- 
bach, of the German Reformed Church, then delivered a discourse 
in the German language from 1 Pet. 5:4. As all the people 
assembled could not be accommodated in the church. Rev. D. 
Gaus withdrew with some of them to the school-house and ad- 
dressed them there. When these services had come to an end, 
the remains of Father Heim were committed to the earth by the 
side of the grave of his wife. Long will the dear people to whom 
he preached remember Father Heim, Soon after a suitable stone 
30 



350 



CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 



was erected, marking his resting-place near the gate of the grave- 
yard, and bearing the following inscription : 



Therefore 

be ye 
also ready. 




what I 
say unto 
you, I say 
unto all, 

Watch. 


HOLY 
BIBLE. 


And 





In Memory of 

The Reverend 

John William Ileim, 

who was born August 8th, 1782, 

Died Dec. 27th, 1849, 

Aged 67 years, 4 mos. and 19 days. 

The deceased was Pastor of 

the Lutheran congregations 

connected with the Lebanon 

Church for upwards of 32 years.* 

The tombstone erected over the grave of Mrs. Heim, bears the 
following inscription in the German language : 

Hier 

Ruben die gebeine 

von 

CatharinOj Ehe Frau 

von dem 

Ehrw. J. W. Heim. 

Sie war geboren den 3 ten Marz, 

1780, und Starb Februar llten, 1848, 

Alter 67 Jahr, 11 Monat und 8 Tag. 



* Having taken charge of Lebanon Church in June, 1815, as his journal 
and the minutes of Synod most clearly show, Rev. Heim was pastor of the 
Lebanon Church, not 32 years as stated on his tombstone, but 34 years and 
about 6 months. 



chaptp:r VII. 351 

The following statistics of Father Heiiu's official ministerial 
acts were collected by the Rev. Jacob Martin : " During his long 
ministerial life of 35 years and about 6 months, Eev. Father Heim 
was instrumental in collecting and organizing 10 congregations. 
He baptized 6456 infants and 132 adults; confirmed 1831 cate- 
chumens, and attended 1017 funerals."* 

It yet remains for us to state some of the more prominent traits 
of Father Heim's character. And here we may be brief, much 
having been already said respecting him in the foregoing pages. 

1. His personal appearance. He was of somewhat more than 
medium stature, compactly built, had a full chest and was broad 
across the shoulders, walked erect, and was possessed of great 
muscular power, and in every way calculated to endure a great 
amount of labor and exposure. He had an athletic constitution, 
enjoyed general good health, was active and full of vigor, and his 
energy seemed to continue unabated to the end of life, and few 
men exceeded him in physical strength. When advanced in 
years, he stooped somewhat when he walked, but was active and 
showed few signs of declining strength or loss of vigor. His 
features were expressive and his complexion was fair ; and he 
was genial, and sincerity and goodwill beamed from his piercing 
eye. His hair hung loosely over his forehead, and in his old age 
was white as snow, adding much to his venerable appearance in 
the pulpit and out of it. He loved his tobacco-pipe dearly, and 
was a good marksman. His faithful dog invariably accompanied 
him wherever he went. In his dress he was simple and plain, 
and the only thing that distinguished him as a clergyman, whether 
in the pulpit or out of it, was a white cravat and a black coat, 
the latter of which was by no means and at all times the finest — 
not always broadcloth, but sometimes homespun. Withal this, 
his appearance was neat, and inspired respect, and his simplicity, 
honesty and Christian spirit won the esteem and admiration of all 
who made his acquaintance. 

2. His mental endoioments. With regard to these we can say 

* See Lutheran Observer, January ISth, 1850. 



352 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

but little, having no means whereby to form an opinion. We 
■presume, however, that he was blessed with a good mind, well 
balanced, and of great energy. To this presumption we are led 
by the fact, that for so many years he controlled, held together, 
built up, and satisfied the varied wants of so many and remote 
congregations. Of his literary attainments we may say, that he 
read the Latin and Greek languages, and also perhaps the He- 
brew. But, as an active pastor of a large charge, he could, from 
the nature of the case, bestow little attention on the classics. He 
was practical, and studied to practice. He was, however, the 
patron of education, and would never consent to ignorance in the 
ministry, being himself educated in all the departments of know- 
ledge essential to a pastor's highest degree of usefulness. 

3. JBis couraye and intrepidity. It is said that David Lewis, 
the robber, at a time lay in wait for him on Tuscarora Mountain. 
When Rev. Heim, then in his prime, passed slowly along and 
observed Lewis approaching him, he said, " By God's help, I am 
your match," and so saying he also demonstrated his ability to 
meet his foe. Lewis eyed him, fell back, and permitted Mr. 
Heira to proceed without molestation. He frequently swam his 
horse at night across the Juniata, when the river was boisterous 
and overflowed its banks. He travelled often by night over 
mountains and through dismal forests ; but was never known to 
express fear of anything living or dead. To reach an appoint- 
ment, he never turned from the direct road on account of high 
water, mountain, or any other threatening danger. ]5ut with all 
his bravery, he was not reckless. His language was : " If God 
wants me there,- 1 must be there in time ; but to be there in time, 
I must take the nearest road, though that road lead through 
water or fire. God will protect me, as he did Jonah and the three 
Hebrew children." 

4. Eis imnctuality. He was remarkable for punctually fulfil- 
ling his engagements. It is not known that he ever failed to fill 
his preaching appointments, and he was always sure to be on the 
ground at the set time. When his forenoon and afternoon ap- 
pointments were from ten to twelve miles apart, he seldom or 



CHAPTER VII. 353 

never stopped to eat a regular meal. He usually, in such e:ise, 
carried a crust of bread in his pocket, and on horseback ate what 
he carried. And then, no matter whether it was warm or cold, 
wet or dry, or whether he had waters or mountains to pass, he 
pressed forward, and lo ! at the appointed time he made his ap- 
pearance. During his ministry of more than thirty-five years, he 
was but once absent from the annual convention of Synod, and 
that was in 1840, when Synod convened at Pittsburg, Pa., and 
when he was sixty years old. What a reproof this to some of our 
present generation of ministers ! Though Synod convened in 
Philadelphia, Reading, Baltimore, Frederick, Md., in short, no 
matter where it met or how far off, Father- Heim was there in 
good time. And then, be it remembered, he travelled all on 
horseback, and to go to and return from Synod in this slow way 
took sometimes from two to three weeks. To attend Synod in 
those days was, we should think, an item of no mean importance 
in a minister's life. Rev. Heim, we are told, never owned or 
travelled in any sort of conveyance; but, on the contrary, he 
always kept one of the best of horses, and that for the best of 
reasons. Though he enjoyed not the easy and expeditious means 
of travelling we do, he was nevertheless more punctual in fulfil- 
ling his engagements than most of us are to meet ours. 

5. His great self-denial and excessive labor. It is perhaps 
impossible to convey in words an adequate idea of the self-denial 
he endured, and of the real amount of labor he performed. His 
field of labor at one time and for fifteen years embraced an area 
of not less than fifty miles from north to south and thirty from 
east to west, having the North Mountain on the south and Jack's 
Mountain on the north, the line of Union County and the Susque- 
hanna River on the east, and the line of Huntingdon County, 
Shade Gap, and Round Top on the west. The Juniata rolls its 
blue waters through the centre of this area from the northwest to 
the southeast, and at right angles cuts through a number of 
mountains, which range from the northeast to the southwest. 
This field which he supplied alone, is now occupied by sixteen 
ministers. He preached regularly at about eighteen different 
30* 



354 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

* 

places. In following his appointments over this extended 
territory, he was often from home from three to four weeks 
at a time, preaching the Gospel, and penetrating into the dark 
forest and mountain spur to speak to the destitute the word 
of eternal life. His family, not hearing of him for so long 
a time, was often thrown into deep distress on account of him, 
and knew not where to seek or find him. He was so venture- 
some, and regardless of danger, that when he thought duty called 
him, then no persuasion would restrain him. In winter, in cold 
and through deep snow, he pressed his way over streams and 
mountains, through dismal forests and deep valleys. Frequently 
did he swim his horse at night across the Juniata when high and 
overflowing its banks. At that time the river was not bridged, 
and to reach his appointments he was obliged to cross and re-cross 
it frequently. Often did he carry with him a long pole with 
which to push away the floating ice and driftwood, and thus 
enable his horse to swim the stream without obstruction ; some- 
times, when the river -was frozen, he led his horse, and, with a 
pole in his hand, struck the ice as he proceeded in order to ascer. 
tain its strength. Once, as he used to relate, his horse became 
entangled in the rushing stream and threw him. Then, said he, 
"I was truly in danger; but by the help of God, I caught hold 
of the tail of my horse, and the poor beast, apparently knowing 
my perilous condition, struggled hard, and landed me safely on 
the shore." He suffered much from exposure to wet and cold. 
He used to say, " The colder it is, the faster I ride." This was 
philosophical. Once, in crossing Tuscarora Mountain at Ickes- 
burg, he found the cold hand of death steal gradually over his 
frame. Arousing himself from the stupor into which he had 
fallen, he afterwards said, " I then called to mind that this 
stupor was a bad sign. I threw myself instantly out of my saddle, 
and commenced to shake the snow off the limbs that hung over 
and closed the path. Thus I worked my way down the moun- 
tain, past Quillen's Rock, and then only became aware how near 
eternity I had been." Nothing, so far as his will was concerned, 
prevented him from reaching his appointments in time. Hence, 
he is said to have travelled so much at night. No matter at what 



CHAPTER yii. 355 

hour at niiilit he was called upon to preach a funeral sermon, 
perhjips, twenty miles off, he was instantly up, got ready, and 
commenced the nightly journey in order to reach the house of 
mourning in good time. The facilities for travelling were not 
then what they are now. He did all his travelling on horseback. 
Then the streams were not bridged, and the roads were not 
graded, thrown up, and piked. How Father Heim was able to 
reach all his appointments, or how he could endure all the labor 
and hardship to which he was subjected, we know not. Sure we 
are that he must have had an almost iron constitution, and vigor 
and strength not equalled by many, if any, of our present race of 
ministers. Eternity will only fully disclose what Father Heim, 
in the discharge of his ministerial duties, suffered and endured, 
not only from the elements and incessant labors, but also from 
wicked, faithless, and ungrateful men, so that he could with no 
small degree of propriety adopt the language of St. Paul : " In 
journeyings often, in perils of waters, in perils of robbers, in perils 
by mine own countrymen, in perils by the heathen, in perils in 
the city, in perils in the wilderness, in perils in the sea, in perils 
among false brethren ; in weariness and painfulness, in watchings 
^often, in hunger and thirst, in fastings often, in cold and naked- 
ness. Besides those things that are without, that which cometh 
upon me daily, the care of all the churches." (2 Cor. 26-28.) 
" But none of these things move me, neither count I my life dear 
unto myself, so that I might finish my course with joy, and the 
ministry which I have received of the Lord Jesus, to testify the 
Gospel of the grace of God." (Acts 20 : 24.) 

6. His deep interest in the henevoJent operations of the Church. 
The cause of missions and beneficiary education lay near his 
heart. He preached frequently on these subjects. And annually 
he paid over at Synod a comparatively large amount of money to 
support these causes, and from his own pocket he advanced at 
different times respectable sums. The American Tract and Bible 
causes also enlisted his hearty co-operation. For years he was 
one of the managers of the Perry County Bible Society. Against 
the vice of drunkenness he preached often and with great energy, 
and for so doing received the maledictions of many who ought to 



356 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

have blessed him for his efforts to reform them. He preached 
in all his pulpits on the advantages of Sabbath-schools, and from 
bis annual reports at Synod we learn that he established one 
wherever he preached. There was not a good cause that did not 
receive his cordial support. 

7. His efforts in behalf of educntion. Having in his young 
days taught school, he always took a deep interest in the pros- 
perity of schools, and visited them wherever and as often as he 
could. He says : "On the 3d of February, ]817, I visited the 
school at Lebanon Church, and was forcibly reminded of the fact 
that in a teacher of children great patience and perseverance are 
required." His idea was that the school should serve as a 
nursery of the church. Hence, he sought to establish congrega- 
tional schools, in which the children were to receive instruction 
in the Catechism and be trained in piety. This was an excellent 
idea, and he carried it out to some extent. Would that such a 
system of schools prevailed yet ! These schools he visited regu- 
larly and examined the pupils. Afterwards, when the public 
system of common schools was introduced, he visited them still, 
but ceased to make his influence so prominently felt, — the schools 
were in a great measure taken out of his hands. In 1825, he^ 
was chosen one of the first directors of the Theological Seminary 
at Gettysburg, Pa., and in May, 1831, was present at and took 
part in the solemnities connected with the laying of the corner- 
stone of the Seminary edifice. For this Institution he collected 
and aided in collecting many hundreds of dollars in his charge. 
He was also elected one of the first directors of Pennsylvania 
College at the same place. For both these institutions of the 
Church he did what he could, and induced a number of young 
men from Perry County to prosecute their studies there. 

8. His ahility as a catechist. Having in the earlier part of 
his life taught school for a number of years, he possessed superior 
excellence as an expounder of the Catechism. His constant aim 
was to not merely inform the understanding, but also to impress 
and affect the heart by the truths he taught. He spared no 
pains to convey clearly to the minds of his catechumens the great 



CHAPTER VII. 357 

and solemn truths of the Christian system of doctrine as developed 
in the Catechism. His custom was, for some time, to meet a class 
once every two or three weeks, and assign a large portion of the 
Catechism to be committed to memory. The one that could re- 
peat that portion best, took his seat at the head of the class. 
Afterwards he met his catechumens twice every day for a week 
or two before confirmation. The whole Catechism was committed 
to memory, together with a large number of proof passages from 
the Scriptures. He made such explanations as seemed to him to 
be required in order to a clear understanding of a subject by the 
catechumens. Much time was also devoted to singing and 
prayer. Thus, whilst bathed in tears himself, his catechumens 
were not unfrequeutly led to see their sins, and with tears to ask, 
"What must we do to be saved?" No one can in truth say that 
Father Heim did not discharge his duty towards his catechumens. 
If any of them continued to pursue a course of sin, it was their 
own fault, and not because he did not warn them or teach them 
aright. He did his utmost to save their souls from death. And, 
blessed be God, his labor was not in vain. There are still many 
among us who thank the Lord for what their aged pastor taught 
them, and who, through his instrumentality, were led to a saving 
knowledge of Jesus Christ. He sowed the divine seed of the 
word of life, that still springs up and will bear fruit unto salva- 
tion long hereafter. Some, it is true, have forgotten his words of 
love and turned their backs against his tears and prayers ; but 
they have done so to their own hurt and shame. Would to God 
such had but a tithe of the piety and Christian consistency their 
aged, but now sainted, pastor had ! Father Heim ! who is there 
that does not revere his memory now? He, a man of God, ex- 
cellent almost beyond comparison in all that constitutes a Christian 
and minister of the Gospel ! 

9. His ahility as a preacher. As a preacher Father Heim 
was certainly not inferior, as is evinced most clearly by the fact 
that for more than thirty-five years he maintained his hold on the 
aifections of the same people. His sermons were usually about 
forty minutes long, and sometimes he delivered them with great 



358 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

power and effect. They were eminently Scriptural and practical. 
His voice was strong and clear, but his delivery was rather slow and 
drawling. He usually had a short sketch or skeleton of his ser- 
mon before him when he preached; but he never read his sermons 
from a manuscript, though he wrote many. Unibrtunately they 
are all lost. He attempted only once or twice to preach in the 
English language, but not succeeding to his satisfaction he tried 
it no more. And strange and inconsistent as it may seem, he 
frequently imparted instruction to catechumens in the English 
language, whilst at the same time he set his face against the in- 
troduction of preaching in that language. This was one of the 
greatest errors he committed as a pastor. But it is human to err ; 
and whilst his judgment was at fault, his opposition to English 
preaching no doubt arose from a desire to do what he conceived 
to be right. 

10. His mode of conducting icorship. Father Heim observed 
the utmost simplicity in conducting religious exercises. He was 
never known to make use of a liturgy, except on sacramental 
occasions, and would have disdained the wearing of a so-called 
clerical robe in the pulpit. With regard to the gown, he would 
have said, as he did to one of his kind members who offered him 
the use of a worn-out umbrella, "Why, brother John, this um- 
brella will not protect me against rain, cold, or heat, — it is of no 
use to me." "Yes, yes, I know what you need most," said friend 
John ; " here is my drab-colored overcoat, with three shoulder 
mantles and a red fox-skin covering the collar." "That is the 
very thing I need most just now," replied the well-pleased pastor. 
And, truly, to him a good overcoat, however coarse and homely, 
was of far more importance than a broken umbrella or a silken 
gown, — these were of no use to him. As his preaching and mode 
of worship, so his dress was, simple and becoming a minister of 
the Gospel of Jesus. And when we remember the circumstances 
that must have continually surrounded him in the performance 
of official duties, we need not wonder that he dispensed with al- 
most every vestige of form and ceremony. He was fond of music, 
and in divine worship generally led the singing himself. He 



CHAPTER VII. 359 

preached often at night, and held prayer-meetings at school-houses 
and private dwellings, and in this direction his labors were fre- 
quently blessed with the happiest results. He never opposed 
genuine revivals of religion; but when properly conducted, he 
most cordially approved of them and promoted them. It is true, 
hoAvever, that he set his face, and justly, too, against those bastard 
excitements gotten up by foreign elements, — elements that de- 
spised knowledge and gloried in deriding the Catechism and cate- 
chetical instruction. Fanaticism said sometimes hard things of 
him — that he had no religion, &c., — but Father Heim was not to 
be driven from stern duty by such unholy means. He knew that 
fanaticism was not religion, and was not to be ensnared by its high 
pretences. He suffered much from this uncontrollable spirit, 
from men who professed perfection in holiness, but possessed not 
even the appearance of the love, piety, consistency, and godly 
sincerity, which characterized him so strikingly. He lived his 
religion; and his godly life will ever give a stern rebuke to all 
the infamous slanders which wicked and yet rampant fanatical 
religionists can utter against him. On the other hand, formalism, 
that dead carcass of undying souls, realized under his faithful and 
pungent preaching a melting leaven in the truth. He classed the 
formalist and openly wicked under one head, and in a manner 
peculiar to himself, showed them that they travelled the same 
broad road. His words bore down at times with such crushing 
weight, that persons gave up all hope — deep darkness covered 
them and horror seized their souls. To such he would say: 
"Behold, the lamb of God." Oh, how he wept and prayed with 
and for the anxious souls of his people ! He used to say, "I must 
show you sin and hell before you will see your danger; but seeing 
what you are and where you are, I will then with joy point you 
to Jesus and heaven, for now you will believe what I say." Some- 
times when viewing his hearers, he would cry out from the depth 
of his heart, amid tears and in great agony of soul : " my 
people ! my people ! what can I do more for you than I have 
done. I have set before you life and death, heaven and hell. 
How will you appear before God in judgment ! I fear, I fear. 



360 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

some of you are yet in the broad way to hell. Let me call upon 
you once more to turn. I mean it well with you. I love your 
soul, and have often wept and prayed for it. hear me then ! 
Turn, turn, why will you die. Jesus will receive you if you 
come to him; but wait not, lest you lift your eyes in hell before- 
to-morrow's sun shall rise. I warn you for your soul's sake, for 
God's sake, for Jesus the dear Redeemer's sake, to flee the wrath 
to come ! Flee quickly, save your soul, and may God help you. 
I feel for you, must give an account for you. O, my God, what 
can I do more than I have done for you !" Here he would fold 
his hands, and burst out in a flood of tears under deep emotion. 
His head all white, his frame shaking, and his face furrowed 
with age and suft'used with tears. Hard was the heart that did 
not break, and dry indeed the eyes that did not weep. 

11. His doctrinal vieios. Luther's Catechism, as published in 
this country with additions, was his guide in preaching and cate- 
chizing. The Augsburg Confession, in the words of the General 
Synod, he received as a substantially correct exhibition of the 
fundamental doctrines of the word of God. We learn from those 
who knew him best, that he claimed liberty for himself and gave 
liberty to others on matters not fundamental ; but, at the same 
time, he would not fellowship with any one who was unsound in 
his faith on any of the cardinal doctrines of religion as held by 
the General Synod of the Lutheran Church in the United States. 
He was certainly orthodox in his religious belief. He was an 
unswerving friend and advocate of the General Synod and its 
doctrinal basis. He was chairman, in 1829, of the committee 
appointed to revise the Constitution of the General Synod, and 
also aided in preparing the Constitution for district Synods, and 
in revising the Catechism. The West Pennsylvania Synod 
elected him a number of times as its delegate to the General 
Synod. 

12. His personal piety. He was a man of prayer, humble, 
consistent in his walk and conversation, full of faith and love, 
serving God with fear and doing good with joy. He was always 
dignified and yet always easy of access to the humblest, commu- 



CHAPTER VII. 361 

nicative, and yet never known to trifle. Jesus was his all ; in 
him he lived, in hini he died, and now with him he reigns and 
shines in glory bright. 

"Now he resides where Jesus is, 

Above this dusky sphere ; 
His soul was ripen' d for that bliss, 

While yet he sojourn'd here. 
The Church's loss we all deplore, 

And shed the falling tear. 
Since we shall see his face no more, 

Till Jesus shall appear." 



31 



362 CIIURCIIE8 BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 



CHAPTER VIII. 

GENIUS OF THE LUTHERAN CHURCH IN PERRY COUNTY. 

Having given a sketch of the history of each congregation as 
well as of the chief features of the life of Rev. Father Heim, we 
would yet add an outline of the genius and spirit of the Lutheran 
Church in Perry County as a whole. 

In 1840, twenty-two years ago, there were in the county eight 
regularly organized Lutheran congregations, — now (June, 1862) 
there are twenty-five and eight preaching-stations ; then one pas- 
tor supplied the whole territory in the county with preaching, — 
now six ministers occupy the field and all have more labor than 
they can well perform j then about 650 communicants were re- 
ported at Synod, — now about 1800 are reported. As some mem- 
bers are, however, during the year, prevented from coming to the 
Lord's table on account of age, sickness and other causes, we may 
put down the number of members, in Perry County, entitled to 
full communion, at 2200, who are distributed among the six differ- 
ent charges in about the following proportion : 



Blain 
Loysville 


charge. 


450 
450 


Bloomfield 




600 


Petersburg 




275 


Liverpool 


" in Perry County, 


275 


Millerstown 


*' ... 


150 



The whole number of members at 

this time entitled to communion, 2200 

Besides those who are entitled, to communion, we also count our 
baptized children and youth, who are not yet admitted to the 
Lord's Supper, as members of the Church. Counting two of these 



CHAPTER VJII. 363 

to every communicant member, we have at tliis time in Perry 
County a Lutheran population of 6600. This estimate, we are 
sure, is rather too low than too high.* 

In 1840, all the congregations worshipped in so-called union- 
churches, that is, in churches erected and owned conjointly with 
other denominations; but now the Lutherans alone own twelve or 
fifteen in the county. The members and pastors have long since 
painfully realized the disadvantages and frequent sad effects aris- 
ing from such misnamed unions, and are therefore unanimously 
opposed to them wherever they can be pi'evented. They are con- 
vinced, by past experience, that it is best for all to erect no more 
such churches, and that then, when each denomination has its 
own houses of worship, there will be more cordial union among 
them, and each will be more useful, not being continually entan- 
gled in the affairs of another. 

In 1840, all the preaching was in the German language ; but 
at present two-thirds of the congregations require German no more 
at all, and the remaining one-third only one-half or occasionally. 
From present indications we are led to believe that before many 
years not a Lutheran congregation will need preaching in the 
German language. It is ten or twelve years since this language 
has ceased to be taught in our common-schools, and as the aged 
pass away, and the youth who know only the English take their 
place, the use of the German language must necessarily and be- 
fore long be among the things that were. 

All the congregations take a deep and active interest in the 
various benevolent operations of the Church. The cause of bene- 

* For the information of the members and all who may desire knowledge 
on the subject, we will subjoin the following estimate of the Lutheran popu- 
lation in the world: Sweden, 3,000,000; Norway, 1,500,000; Denmark, the 
Faroe Islands, Jutland and Greenland, 2,000,000; Prance, 500,000; Protest- 
ant Germany, 25,000,000; Prussia, 5,000,000; Austria, Hungary, Bohemia 
and Moravia, 1,500,000; Poland and Russia, 2,500,000; United States, 1,600,- 
000; "West India Islands, 100,000; Brazil, 100,000; South American States, 
50,000; New South Wales, 5,000; Nova Scotia and the Canadas, 10,000; 
Holland, 600,000; England, 40,000; Italy, 500; Turkey in Europe, 15,000; 
Hindoostan, 10,000— Total, 43,530,500. 



364 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

ficiary education, of Home and Foreign Missions, of Temperance, 
also of the Bible and Tract Societies, and all other causes that 
tend to extend the Redeemer's kingdom, receive their cordial co- 
operation and material aid. 

Every congregation has its Sunday-school in successful opera- 
tion, and the cause of education in general receives encourage- 
ment and active support from all the churches. Of late years, 
especially, have education and intelligence made rapid progress, 
and we are happy to believe that on these points the Lutheran 
population of Perry County will, on the whole, bear a favorable 
comparison with any other community in this part of the State. 
To verify this, we need but recur to a few facts. About six years 
ago, the late Col. John Tressler, prompted by a laudable desire to 
promote education, erected at his own expense at Loysville a spa- 
cious and convenient edifice, where an Academy of the first order 
was opened and has since been deservedly well patronized. This 
excellent institution has done and is now doing a good work in 
that community. Besides this Academy, five or six other high 
schools, in diiferent parts of the county, are largely patronized by 
the members, whose children receive at these institutions of learn- 
ing a liberal education. The following members of the Church 
in the county have graduated with honor at Pennsylvania Col- 
lege, Gettysburg : J. Andrew Tressler, Jot^iah R. Titzel, John M. 
Rice, David L. Tressler, J. R. Williams and Andrew T. Kistler; 
Victor Gr. Tressler, Rudolphus J. Heim, David Elliot, John W. 
Tressler and John Kistler, pursued a pretty full course at the 
same College, and J. T. L. Sahm, Lemuel 0. Foose and D. L. 
McKenzie are there now. The following, from this county, have 
entered the ministry of the Lutheran Church : Revs. David Smith, 
John W. Tressler, John M. Rice, John Kistler and Michael Gr. 
Earhart, all of whom are now laboring successfully in the vine- 
yard of the Lord, and the following are now prosecuting their theo- 
logical studies with a view to the ministry : J. R. Williams and 
A. T. Kistler at the Theological Seminary at Gettysburg, and 
John G. Breininger in the theological department of the Mis- 
sionary Institute at Selinsgrove, Pa. This representation speaks 



CHAPTER VIII. 365 

well; but we sincerely hope that it is only the beginning of a 
glorious educational career in the Church of this county. With 
the introduction of preaching in the English language, ten or 
fifteen years ago, a new era on the subject of education com- 
menced. Of late years the members have evinced an unusual 
degree of interest in this noble cause, and we may cherish the 
pleasing hope that they will illustrate in Perry County the well- 
known fact, that the Lutheran Church is an educating and edu- 
cated Church. Her admirable system of catechetical instruction 
plays no small part in advancing education. The members in 
this county, especially the English-speaking portion of them, are 
a reading people, and secure and study the literature of their own 
Church, to which they are sincerely attached ; they are active, in- 
telligent, and go forward in every good cause ; they receive the 
Lutheran Observer as their weekly adviser in general Church in- 
telligence ; and most of them have possessed themselves of a good 
family library of choice religious and miscellaneous literature. 
The prospects are certainly fair of soon seeing an ample harvest 
spring from this field of cultivated mind. 

Each Lutheran congregation in the county has a weekly prayer- 
meeting, conducted by the pastor, or in his absence by a member 
of the Church-Council. These religious meetings for mutual edi- 
fication are generally well attended by the members, and we think 
there are few, if any, of the male members who would not lead in 
prayer at these meetings when requested so to do. During these 
exercises, in addition to the singing of hymns and the ofi'ering of 
prayer, a portion of God's word is read, which the pastor, if pre- 
sent, expounds. Most of them have also daily family- worship, 
conducted by the head of the household; and if any neglect this 
Christian duty, they are by the Church considered as remiss and 
subject to admonition and reproof by the Church-Council. Pa- 
rents are expected and required to teach their children the doc- 
trines of our holy religion as set forth in the Catechism. 

Each pastor is expected, as often as possible, to meet the youth 
of his charge for instruction in the Catechism. This duty is, 
perhaps, nowhere more faithfully and thoroughly performed than 
.SI* 



366 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

by the Lutheran pastors in Perry County. The results of this 
kind of pastoral labor are often most cheering. If properly con- 
ducted catechization is a blessed means of doing good, and in the 
very nature of the case there can never be found a substitute for 
it. The Catechism is not only committed by the catechumens, 
but the pastor explains, illustrates, and by practical remarks ap- 
plies and enforces the truths so committed. Considerable time 
is also devoted to the singing of appropriate hymns and the offer- 
ing up of prayer to God. These exercises are usually continued 
for many weeks, and at last daily. During this time it almost in- 
variably occurs that some or perhaps all of the catechumens are 
by the truth awakened to a realizing sense of their sins and lost 
condition, and of their need of a personal and saving interest in 
the merits of the blood of Jesus Christ. Here, then, is what may 
be called a revival. If the religious interest thus commenced ex- 
tends to others, as is often the case, then the pastor holds what 
may be called a protracted meetivg. The members are exhorted 
to give themselves to special prayer in their families and closets, 
more frequent meetings for social prayer are held, at which the 
awakened persons are expected to attend for instruction and direc- 
tion. The pastor visits the families in the community where the 
meeting is held and in progress, prays with them, and admonishes 
the careless of their duty and warns the impenitent of their 
danger. During each day an anxious meeting is held — or, if you 
prefer the expression, there is catechization, — when the pastor in- 
structs or advises the awakened souls. Such meetings are held 
in the church if the number of the awakened is large ; if their 
number is small, then the pastor visits them in their fomilies, or 
gives them the needed instruction in the catechetical class, if they 
are catechumens. The preaching will of course be adapted to the 
occasion. The great object will be to humble the sinner by show- 
ing him what he is and to what he is exposed ; to point him to 
the only refuge, to teach him that the only condition on which he 
can be saved is the exercise of repentance toward God and faith 
in the Lord Jesus Christ, and to urge him to accept of the prof- 
fered salvation now. Those, then, who have been so instructed, 



CHAPTER VITI. 367 

who have intelligent views of the plan of salvation, and who give 
satisfactory evidence of having been born again by the Holy Ghost, 
are admitted to full communion by the solemn rite of confirmation. 
During such protracted meetings no unnecessary noise or any kind 
of confusion and disorder are encouraged or tolerated. Our pas- 
tors and members know that religion is not wild fanaticism on 
the one hand, nor dead formalism on the other. Hence, they 
preach with all earnestness, the absolute necessity of a change of 
heart, wrought by the Holy Ghost, and of good works as evidence 
of such a change. Protracted meetings, so conducted, have in 
this county been blessed with the most cheering and glorious re- 
sults. May the Lord multiply them, and fill the earth with His 
glory ! 

In their public worship, the congregations observe a Scriptural 
simplicity, studiously avoiding everything that would divert at- 
tention from the Cross of Christ. For the sake of uniformity in 
worship, and as a guide in the administration of the ordinances of 
God's house, the Liturgy of the General Synod is used on sacramen- 
tal occasions, and on no other. The pastors have hitherto followed 
the example of Father Heim, decking themselves, not with gowns, 
but raiment becoming ministers of the Gospel and the house of 
God, and anxiously seeking, not to attract attention to them- 
selves, but to direct all attention to the blessed Gospel of the 
adorable Son of God. So may they continue to do ! 

All the congregations in the county have adopted the Formula 
of the General Synod, appended to the Lutheran Hymn-Book, as 
their rule for government and discipline, or a constitution in full 
harmony therewith. 

As to their doctrinal position, the Catechism is the guide in the 
impartation of family and catechetical instruction. In addition 
to this, the pastors and congregations unanimously believe with 
the General Synod and the Synod of Central Pennsylvania : '' I. 
That the Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments are the 
Word of God, and the only infallible rule of faith and practice. 
2. That the following fundamental doctrines of the Word of God 
are correctly taught in the doctrinal articles of the Augsburg 



368 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE iMOUNTAINS. 

Confession, viz., The existence of one God, — the Trinity of the 
Godhead, — the Deity of our Lord Jesus Christ, — the universal 
depravity of man, — the Savior's vicarious sufferings and death, — 
the justification of the sinner by foith in the Son of God, — the 
necessity of the Holy Spirit to regenerate and sanctify the soul, — 
the one Holy Catholic (or universal) Church, — the divine institu- 
tion of the Ministry, and of the sacraments of Baptism, and the 
Lord's Supper, — the necessity of repentance and good works, — 
the return of Christ to judge the world in righteousness, — the 
resurrection of the dead, — the everlasting blessedness of the right- 
eous, and the eternal punishment of the wicked." 

The above is a brief summary of the doctrines every one must 
cordially believe that would be a member of the Church. It is a 
good, a Scriptural confession. And whilst Lutherans glory in 
their inheritance, and would not part with it, they are at the 
same time ever disposed to fraternize and co-operate with all other 
evangelical denominations in the promotion and advancement of 
the Redeemer's kingdom among men. 



CONCLUSION. 369 



CONCLUSION. 



I HAVE now finished my task. The history of the Lutheran 
Church in Perry County is now before the reader. From the 
earliest stages of her rise and progress to the present time we 
have followed her with patient interest and marked her gradual 
growth and various operations with delight. The small cloud 
that rose between the mountains nearly a century ago, now covers 
the heavens,-*— the feeble vine that was planted in the wilderness 
has thrown out its branches, and now occupies the land from 
mountain to mountain. From the past we look hopefully into 
the future. Much has been done ; much remains to be done. 
But the great Head of the Church lives, and she shall live and 
prosper. He guided her thus far, and will guide her safely and 
triumphantly to the haven of rest eternal in heaven. If she is 
true to Christ and her mission, her future career will exceed in 
glory her past history. May the Lord Jesus baptize with the 
Holy Ghost her ministry and laity. May she rise and shine, her 
light come, and the glory of the Lord rise upon her ! 



' I love thy ZioB, Lord, 

The house of thine abode ; 
The Church, blest Eedeemer, sav'd 

With thine own precious blood. 
I love thy Church, God ! 

Her walls before thee stand, 
Dear as the apple of thine eye. 

And graven on thy hand. 
If e'er to bless thy sons 

My voice or hands deny. 
These hands let useful skill forsake, 

This voice in silence die. 



370 CHURCHES BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINS. 

If e'er my heart forget 

Her welfare or her woe, 
Let ev"ry joy this heart forsake, 

And ev'ry grief o'erflow. 
For her my tears shall fall ; 

For her my pray'rs ascend ; 
To her my cares and toils be giv'n. 

Till toils and cares shall end. 
Beyond my highest joy 

I prize her heav'nly ways. 
Her sweet communion, solemn vows, 

Her hymns of love and praise." 



THE END. 



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